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Author Topic: Ideas to share concerning 1:18 '67-'69 GMP Penske Donohue Camaros.  (Read 40610 times)
Jon Mello
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« Reply #210 on: March 05, 2013, 12:44:35 AM »

Mike, the front flares are seemingly better even though you have some more work to be done on them. Did the Tempest actually run fabricated inner fenderwells back in '71? If I knew, I have forgotten.
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« Reply #211 on: March 08, 2013, 12:35:10 AM »

Well, I went and looked around and sure enough in the July '71 issue of Motor Trend there is a picture of the Tempest's engine compartment from the Lime Rock Trans-Am.
It does appear to have the "homemade" inner fenderwells, which seems a bit of a surprise to me.

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Jon Mello
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« Reply #212 on: March 08, 2013, 02:27:55 PM »

Hi Jon,

Thanks - finding and posting such was very kind of you.  I had the same once before, lost my collection of Motor Trend, copied the same article from an archive, and recently found another copy - albeit the image is tiny as you know.  To my knowledge, such is the only in-period engine compartment shot of the car.  I study the same, hoping dearly that what is black and white might convert to a color image.  The recently taken photos of the car displays roughly the same and predictably, somewhat worse for wear too. The panel work has been cut to facilitate the fitting of brake cooling ducts routed from the inboard headlamps, and though such was legal in '71, nothing confirms such was ever used during the single season the car was campaigned in the Trans Am.  

Hoping very much to secure the incomplete remains of a 1:18th GMP '70 GTO which could afford either just the air cleaner and fresh air metal stamping plus seal, or the entire driveline if this might be superior to the Lane tool.  It seems they clipped the base a bit near the outboard circles that otherwise would form a seal to the twin scoops beneath the '70 hood.  Not at all certain I can successfully perform such, but I do have a 1:18th ERTL Authentics '67 Impala SS as a parts car that may (or may not) yield up proper scissor hinges for the hood, as well as better door hinges.  The hood hinges would be combined with a new firewall with an indentation reflecting the engine setback and the cowl fresh air cutout not yet seen on the model.  Room will be tight underneath the hood 'stamping' for I'm working with a hopelessly thick casting instead!  Regarding the doors and hinge assemblies, it seems I'll need to do something in this respect for the dog-leg hinges on the model fundamentally interfere with the yet to be fabricated roll cage members stretching forward and behind each respective A-pillar.  I've done them in brass to establish the dimensions and angles needed, although absent proper hinge work, I'm reluctant to final fab. these.  

Lastly, I'm rebuilding the front left flare to 'add length' much as I did on the rear, although I do believe I'll retain the profile and shape of the front right.  Still going then. Thanks again...

Mike K.
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Jon Mello
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« Reply #213 on: March 09, 2013, 01:15:55 AM »

Mike, I very glad my posting of that photo was very helpful to you. I had not stopped to consider how the design of the roll cage might interfere with the door hinges on this car. There have been a number of headaches as you have moved from one thing to another on this model but I'm glad you are sticking with it.
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« Reply #214 on: March 11, 2013, 02:24:03 PM »

Thanks again for the interest, the kind feedback,

Pleased to report that a 1:18th GMP 1970 GTO parts car has been secured under very generous terms that require that I only cover shipping.  Concerning the tool, of particular interest is the engine and fresh air system, with the former possibly coming as tooled with Ram Air IV heads, while the air cleaner and seal seen in the photograph is clearly a far better basis from which to work as contrasted to what it will replace.  

The firewall was cut clear out of the shell 1964 Tempest just yesterday, permitting the fabrication of an entirely new assembly absent any evidence of the awful dog leg hinges such came through with.  A collection of photographs of a stripped down '64 Tempest shell has been downloaded, the effort facilitated for typing 'rust-free shell 1964 Tempest' into an online image search.  For some Pontiac custom fans, their exists something of a cult of having a smooth firewall with scarcely a thing on it, hence complex contours witnessed are few.  A wiper motor, the distinctive twin remote oil filter setup, a plug atop the heater core, etc. will be required, but in total little should provide too terrible a challenge.  The racing cowl induction setup will be reproduced in full, with all seals, etc. on the firewall and what I might be able to reproduce beneath the hood given scant clearance.  

1:18th ERTL American Muscle 1967 Impala SS scissor hood hinges will be fit to the model, while I intend to do a larger two-piece mold for the hood to reproduce the same in lighter resin.  Such will stress the hinges less, whereas otherwise I doubt very much that a bond could be made to hold between the hinges and the edge of panel they support.  Door hinges will be scratchbuilt, although it will likely take until spring before I might make an inspection of an actual 1964 Tempest/GTO to establish what I'll need to scratchbuild here.  1:25th custom model enthusiasts and builders fabricate hinges all the time, whereas for working in the larger scale I ought to have few excuses to at least equal their efforts.  Kind regards to the community.  



...underhood of a standard 1:18th GMP 1970 Pontiac GTO Ram Air IV.  Quite good!  


Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 11:25:10 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
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« Reply #215 on: March 17, 2013, 02:57:54 PM »

Greetings,

The 1:18th GMP '70 GTO parts car arrived, with items so-afforded being blended into the project where and when the suit.  The firewall has been cut out of the '64 Sun Star Tempest/GTO, with a scratch-built unit taking shape as can be seen.  The engine set-back necessitated firewall cutout affording clearance for such is yet to come, whereas the throttle bell crank should be possible.  The home-brewed cowl induction 'system' may be seen taking shape, whereas a wiper motor from the 1:18 ERTL American Muscle '67 Impala SS will be added.  

Although not final, the 1:18th GMP '70 GTO fresh air seal and base was combined with the 1:18th Hwy. 61 '69 Camaro air filter which still proves a better shape, whereas the valve covers and front accessory drive were likewise isolated and substituted in.  One might also notice the upper control arms and the extent of the frame which rises above a flat plane removed from the GMP tool and slated to be likewise added.  Clearance pockets for the upper control arms have not yet been cut into the inner fender assemblies which aren't final either. Though impossible to make out here, each upper control arm is held in with a pin that enables each to pivot and swing in accordance with its function, while shock detail, ball joint detail and the fact that each control arm seems to been painted silver will make all of this stand out - in time.  




...the top pulley was sanded from behind to convert the two-channel/two-belt pulley to a single-channel/single-belt version as per the actual car.  The GMP '70 GTO pulley was also larger of diameter, again better reflecting what was employed on the Pontiac V8.  



...very poorly illuminated this, nevertheless a view of the fuel cell inlet taking shape.  Thanks...


Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 11:33:59 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
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« Reply #216 on: March 19, 2013, 04:44:56 PM »

Hello,

Modest update depicting fabricated inner wings being shaped and sized.  Full-length top-to-bottom nearest the radiator support, tapering a bit towards the rear, plus slightly stylized control arm cutouts for each side.  The opening for the hinges will be enlarged, while the bend nearest the firewall on each inner wing will be fabricated and added soon.  Not terrible as a baseline.  One notices four holes drilled atop each assembly, these positioned well forward.  It is my understanding that one could remove spark plugs and situate them within these holes as needed.  Thanks...




Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 11:35:44 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #217 on: March 20, 2013, 12:08:06 AM »

Mike, your latest work is really paying off. I'm liking how things are turning out. It is really picking up the flavor of the real car, in my opinion.
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« Reply #218 on: March 23, 2013, 09:48:29 AM »

Greetings,

Only modest changes will be noticed even for the considerable labor required to afford such.  The foam cold air seal ring was trimmed to reflect the revisions made to the 1:1 item for use on the Gray Ghost, but pity I misjudged and cut carelessly.  Further, I could not determine how to reduce the height of the seal which needed to be at best one-third as tall as the stock seal.  Perplexed, I opted to create a mold of the seal, to latter sand and shape the result pulled from it for use here.  The casting was mounted on a round plug to stabilize it as I went about the process of both thinning the part top to bottom and shaping with care the areas the otherwise would be the two smaller circles that blend into the cold air seal as per stock.  A good result achieved, but very very tedious...

The original firewall structure has been reintroduced to the work after first sanding off the face of the same and filing in the opening necessary for the home-brewed cowl induction setup.  What was an empty void behind the fabricated firewall is no longer.  For reemploying the structure, the forward end of the roof assembly can be positively sited, as can be the dashboard that now reappears on the work.  A seal is further seen on the firewall, as well as structure to support the brake master cylinder.  The black box to the top right of the firewall is a wiper motor.  Thanks...



Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 11:36:37 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
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« Reply #219 on: March 28, 2013, 05:51:35 PM »

Greetings,

Perhaps not enthrallling, but how engine setback is accommodated in 1:18th scale.  Plastic sheet in two thicknesses, with the weld bead clear nail polish applied thin on the edges that meet, and rather thick consistent with pushing the material out from behind.  The heater core cover is also new (it seemed fabricated rather than a delete plate), whereas left of the cowl seal is where fuel is routed to the carburetor.  Concerning the firewall - more exciting seams and bumps to follow.

Though not witnessed here, the accessory drive configuration has been altered to the extent that the alternator has been repositioned to the left and down, while I'm trying to source fanbelts both small and large enough to suit the application.  Odd setup in use whereby the top pulley and bottom run in tandem for the use of a single belt, whereas a second pulley 'row' is employed on the bottom to run the alternator without 'involving' the top pulley at all.  Well - that's how I discern matters in the period photo seen above!  Pushing the bottom pullies outward required some analysis, such which revealed that no harmonic balancer was present on the scale representation of the Pontiac V8 employed.  For scratchbuilding the same, problem solved...  

I've gathered material to scratchbuilt a Edelbrock R4B intake which is a dual-plane design appearing very much like a squashed octopus when viewed from above.  As contrasted to the intake seen on the '72 Adams/Milt Minter Firebird which appears very modern by way of contrast, this earlier design is and will be very 'old school'.  At first the GMP intake seemed something I could use, then something I could modify, whereas now it will serve as a dimensional template.  Why all the fuss?  This I cannot tell you.  Thanks...



Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 11:37:11 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #220 on: March 31, 2013, 12:35:22 AM »

Mike, I would agree that it looks like the alternator pulley is driven off the crank without involving the
water pump pulley. Pretty odd in comparison to what is normally seen. I can't believe you are scratch
building an intake manifold. Wow! My hat is off to you.
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« Reply #221 on: April 01, 2013, 01:37:07 PM »

Thanks for the kind notice,

... the intake is well underway.  Mounting flanges and base recycled from 1:18th GMP '70 GTO, whereas the individual levels of the two-plane design constitute two layers of plastic sheet shaped to suit.  A base for the water inlet was taken from the 1:18th ERTL Authentics '67 Impala SS and reused here, whereas most everything else was blended together for the use of putty.  Though a bit muddy in the photo image provided, the cast-in manifold heat passage has been added, while 'burning it' together via the use of clear lacquer discolored matters a bit.  When a mold is made of this, all should blend together in an agreeable fashion.

The carburetor base combines two castings formerly scratchbuilt to reproduce a fair Hurst S/S AMX cross ram intake.  The rear of the manifold flanges required sectioning in of material to reproduce the solid contour seen in the photo atop the model, whereas other discreet additions will in all likelihood bring it to life.  I may cover the part with a dusting of baking soda scattered atop a layer of clear to afford the entire assembly a bit of surface texture.  

This prototype is a bit raw, whereas modest additional detail will be added including attachment points for hardware, linkages, etc.  For use on the '70-'71 season Pontiacs then, hence one for the '70 T/G Firebird (with hack and slash mods. for the first race if I so choose given they tried to slip a short deck block past tech.), one for the Gray Ghost, and perhaps one for a B.F. Goodrich Radial 'Tirebird' if such is ever attempted.  Proceeding ahead then.



Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 11:38:59 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #222 on: April 02, 2013, 06:55:27 PM »

Very impressive, Mike. All I can say is "Wow!" again.
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Jon Mello
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« Reply #223 on: April 07, 2013, 02:37:04 PM »

Thanks for the kind interest,

An attempt here to reproduce some detail seen on the 1:25th plastic version of the Gray Ghost a while back, for I've created a mold of the grille sans identification, creating two in total, and have flattened the profile of the front bumper (as opposed to the 'vee' as per stock).  Further, the opening witnessed within and across the front bumper ought to have continued both straight and flat where the license plate mount is seen, and hence what additional material rose above this opening has since been trimmed back.  

A bit of a muddle at present for the result appears as menacing as a slow-moving nurse shark.  Clearly the bumper needs to be both raised and pulled further back into the panel work, but strangely meek it appears in total.  I'm sure it was the right choice to make, whereas filing off and rebuilding the Pontiac 'beak' on a slight diminishing angle will help consolidate matters visually.  It seems Trans-Action (the official name of the team then) had an eye on the Holman and Moody Torino Talledegas to the extent of discreetly cleaning up the profile up front.  

In other news, the resin intake was added, further refinement of the upper control arm mounts and blending of the chassis to the added GMP '70 GTO items is in process, while an incongruous Orbit Orange painted hood tachometer pod replaces the Lane '68 Firebird part.  Kind regards to the community with much appreciation...

Mike K.



...before, and such will look better for the front bumper is body color and the grilles reflect back a chrome finish.  The standard grilles are in fact stamped aluminum, hence no profound worry that I'll not be able to strictly see to this via the use of Alclad lacquer.



...slightly underwhelming, if not slightly dumpy.  The bumper will move up a bit, and further back surely.  The 'loss' of finishes detracts from what work was in point of fact done, while looking at now-prominent 'beak' suggests a nose job is surely in the offing...



...still requiring some work to clean up the side indicator pockets wish bear evidence of unneeded extra material.  The headrest is too wide as well - this slated to shrink from side-to-side.  The resin intake pokes through, while yes - I do have to reduce the height of everything to ensure the hood may close, etc.  


Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 11:41:51 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
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« Reply #224 on: April 13, 2013, 10:54:36 AM »

Greetings,

A happy discovery here and update of something I felt settled, done, finished, etc.  Some firm known as Pegasus Model Accessories also does turned aluminum wheels in scale, whereas product #2399 23" Aluminum Stepped Sleeves replace the previous aluminum wheel lips employed.  Such feature a less fussy lip design, are agreeably tapered, and may have been fabricated from harder stock in point of fact.  

The previous effort cost about $45 spread across two applications/models and largely extinct on the market, whereas these are $9.99 the set and gasp, are available! Further, the slightly oversized diameter issue suggesting I'd 'upgraded' (not desired this) to 16" rims vanishes for the replacements are incrementally smaller in diameter - this judged good too.  Yes - the 'beak job' is coming - I promise!  Examining the final Mid-Ohio image suggests a very non-stock angle, hence all will be corrected and/or seen to.  Thanks...





Very subtle front bumper mount work, witnessing the further tucking in of the assembly relative to the panelwork.  





For near-endless revision of the 1:18th wheel arches, the shortcomings of the 1:25th resin-bodied version suddenly came into focus resulting in this update.  Taller and wider openings now both front and rear, and given the materials work quickly, this done in about forty minutes total.  So soon from now I'll attend a local club meeting where plastic is extolled and diecast is loathed, hence I sense that both projects should be displayed to quell quibbles.  The fueling port on the resin model is approximately right, whereas the 1:18th effort clearly needs to grow.  Thanks...


Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 11:46:39 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
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