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| | |-+  Ideas to share concerning 1:18 '67-'69 GMP Penske Donohue Camaros.
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Author Topic: Ideas to share concerning 1:18 '67-'69 GMP Penske Donohue Camaros.  (Read 56381 times)
wolfmin
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« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2011, 12:23:37 PM »

I have picked up several of these models over the past few years with great plans. I found that one of the easiest first improvements you can do on these models is to replace the exhaust pipes with K&S aluminum tubing.  Nice size, color and wall thickness.
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Jon Mello
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« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2011, 03:05:11 PM »

Regarding the notch in the air cleaner housing, these two photos should give you a fair idea of what it needs to look like. I thought I had something better in my files but can't locate them as of yet.



« Last Edit: June 07, 2011, 06:53:33 PM by Jon Mello » Logged

Jon Mello
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« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2011, 03:27:00 PM »

The dash in the car looks very similar in layout to the one seen below (from Pat Ryan's Penske Camaro). Some differences are...
1) yours should be painted black.
2) yours should not have the protruding light in the 10 o'clock position relative to the tach.
3) your tach should have single digits (read in thousands) rather than double-digits (read in hundreds).
4) the tach needle should be at rest around the 5 o'clock position rather than the 4 o'clock seen below.
5) there is just one switch on the left side, slightly lower than the top one seen below.
6) the stock switches should still be present in the dash
7) disregard the center dash area in the photo below. Your model is different than that.


Photo by Jon Mello
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2011, 12:18:41 PM »

Thank you both, and thanks Jon for turning up and posting the '67 cowl induction air cleaner housing photographs - I really appreciate the kindness,

Slow progress, dash and other parts soaking in paint stripper - hence not quite photo-worthy.  1:18 Lane cowl induction air cleaner/snorkel/plenum assembly lent to me, the same promptly cast.  Took casting and enlarged snorkel (will modify and reshape given your input Jon - thanks!), whereas largely happy with the shape of the Lane air filter lid and housing.  Plenum overly large at present, but this is scheduled to be further shaped and shrunk as I get closer to what is required.  

What is seen in the photograph painted black is the standard 1:18 Lane Performance part, the white resin item that which I cast and subsequently modified, whereas the last item is the standard 1:18 GMP exposed element part.  Still a work in progress, whereas I next hope to remove the hood and hinges, and final fit with the engine and firewall in place.  Where the plenum is screwed down at three points will be sanded to reflected a bit of a bend in the material, whereas again, all of this will shrink a bit as I come closer to final.   If it all comes together, I'll likely cast the finished '67 air filter/snorkel/plenum in its entirety should anyone want one.  Yes, I'll get that recess seen on the base correct - thanks Jon!



Need to experiment more with regards to the exhaust dumps.  Have tried to bend the appropriate K&S tubing diameter to suit, although I greatly suspect I'm not using a good enough bender; i.e. my efforts crimp.  Have tried to apply heat prior to bending, but alas, no dice.  Thanks for the kind suggestion to try the same.  More to come...

Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 12:44:46 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
Swede70
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« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2011, 12:33:00 PM »

This concerning the dash and directions taken,

Thanks for the very nice '67 dash image Jon.  The Maisto part is crude, but a basis for something and hence I'm using it.  Did wonder if standard heater control block out plates or radio block out plates were used, although if they were plastic I can't imagine a race fabricator adding flammable anything to the interior.  Probably best to cut out the entire center section, and insert a fabricated overlay sans detail.  Thought too as to whether the push/pull standard switches were retained, and if not, if the resultant holes were left alone or plugged.  Thanks for guiding the way forward here.  Though constrained by the scarce availability of 1:18 specific photoetched parts, metal rings for the instruments and photo-reduced gauge faces will likely find their way here.  At least the strange 'tunnel effect' of the gauge faces will be done away with on the standard GMP model as-delivered.

I'm seeing what appears to be an asbestos pad in one photo not unlike what was seen in the forward footwells '69-'70 Bud Moore Mustangs.  What a modeler might do is to take a few sheets of paper towel and soak the same in a solution of diluted white glue, press fit the same to the footwell, remove when dry, and then trim/paint/fit the resultant 'pad'.   A bit tedious, but at least no asbestos hazard is risked!  Thanks for the interest and support.  Model now features an exterior round side mirror - but sigh, for that news the ground did not shake.

Mike K.
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Jon Mello
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« Reply #20 on: June 10, 2011, 09:55:44 AM »

Nice work on the new casting for ther cowl plenum assembly. Very impressive, especially for an unfinished piece. Regarding the dash, the factory delete plates were removed. The metal bezel/trim for that center area was kept but all black (no more chrome edge). In the upper area where the heater controls would be on a normal Camaro, there were 12 vertically mounted fuses. These were on a plate that was at the same angle as the dash but sunk in maybe 1/4". In the radio hole, there were at least two but probably three toggle switches mounted on a plate that did not follow the angle of the dash. The plate was vertical (perpendicular to the ground) so that the effect was the top appeared to be more sunken in than the bottom. Underneath that center dash area were two gauges. A small 2 1/16" gauge similar to the ones in the dash pad and to its right, a larger 2 5/8" gauge which I think is for fuel pressure. Both are angled slightly toward the driver and appear to be in separate mounting brackets. The stock shift boot is used and the metal ring to hold it down is black. As for the pad, it was not used earlier in the season. I know it appears to be in there for the race following Marlboro but when it was added, I don't know. The floor itself is blacked out. I hope this is useful.
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2011, 10:34:12 AM »

Thanks for the kind guidance Jon concerning the '67 dash and all else,

Work continues across the three Camaros, whereas the photo below chart my efforts to come up with better 1:18th Trans Am Minilites.  I created a new mold across the weekend for the '69 wheels, whereas I hope to paint them a Tamiya F1 'Camel cigarettes' yellow versus the rather pale GMP paint spec. Wheels now soaking in Bleche White to ensure that paint will adhere to them.  

I wasn't happy with the rather mechanically rendered GMP Minilites, especially regarding the spoke design, whereas sometime back the opportunity was taken to hand form spokes and replace the outer wheel lip with something featuring a proper taper complete with the upraised rim edge detail for the '69 wheels, and the 'lipless' design for '70 and later wheels.  All very tedious to perform, but a nice improvement yielded.


...old photograph comparing standard GMP Minilite to revised wheel prior to final puttywork.  Note black plastic 'flat lip' rim outer, scratchbuilt and hand shaped spokes, stock wheel spider and reuse of inner rim structure.  Base model a basic mockup of a ERTL-based 1:18 '70 Vic Elford Chaparral Camaro that is depicted here without flarework of any kind; i.e. a bit crude.


...same wheel, now with '69 wheel outer lip.


...same project, '70 and later Minilite next to unmodified GMP wheel and tire.


...'69 wheels and tires, new instrument pod for '67, revised '67 front package shelf with '69 dashpad that edged into same sanded off.  Finer panel and cluster work still to come.  


Thanks...

Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2014, 08:32:39 PM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #22 on: June 14, 2011, 12:22:19 PM »

Mike, I have to confess I was not aware of the subtle differences between a '60s Minilite and the '70-later version. It is a little hard to see on the small wheels shown in your photos. I'll see if I might have some photos that make this more readily apparent. Once again though, impressive work and thanks for sharing it with us.
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JoeC
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« Reply #23 on: June 15, 2011, 05:43:52 AM »

Fantastic Modeling work - looks great

one small detail on the Hurst chrome shifter stick. The 60's and early 70s Hurst chrome stick were stamped with larger Hurst letters
then is used today. They are hard to find. I have large letter sticks for 67-68 Camaro, 69 Camaro, and 70 Camaro so I know they used the larger Hurst letters in those years
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Swede70
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« Reply #24 on: June 15, 2011, 11:15:33 AM »

Thanks indeed for the shifter 'HURST' imprint insight/feedback,

Worried I might have few choices in 1:18 to address same, whereas in 1:24 and 1:25 plastic so many options for there are so many higher quality kits to draw spares from.  I like 1:18 diecast for the topic is naturally larger, the assemblies more robust, the white metal bodies receptive to the use of actual auto body supplies.  Not so delicate then but for what delicate items I choose to add.

Anyhow, a revised '67 fiberglass plenum - the shape informed by an article found where the same was reproduced.  Much less bulk, whereas a coin can be seen below the air cleaner housing to raise it a bit, allowing the snorkel to bend down.  Tried too to curve down the plenum as it meets the hinge detail, while the center has been sanded to reflect where again the plenum bends slightly at it is screwed to the cowl proper.  Look closely for subtle this is.  The plenum is still a bit tall of section, but coming closer then.  Sorry for headache-inducing images; i.e. a proper full-manual control camera something not at present possible to budget.  Thanks...



...tried to file in air cleaner base divot.  

M.K.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 12:54:46 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #25 on: June 17, 2011, 12:01:12 PM »

Mike, that air cleaner and duct are coming along nicely!
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #26 on: June 18, 2011, 02:29:30 PM »

Thanks for the kind words,

Ordered spare trunklid without fuel dump 'hole'; i.e. a solid standard trunk lid from another 1:18 GMP release via a modder on eBay adept at creating dioramas.  Hope this will afford me right utility to fashion the same into what I need; i.e. same panel with a smaller inlet and vent if I can confirm just how to site it.  Worried that so much work on that panel would draw undo attention to same, whereas modest paint mismatch is the worst that could become of replacing the lid outright.  The 'solid' lid will form the basis of a clean and unexpected mod. for those quite used to seeing the incorrect fueling gear on the '67 rendition of the GMP Penske Camaro Trans Am.  

Seams now added to fiberglass plenum, as well as the intake snorkel on either side.  Nearing final, hoping to recast air cleaner assembly to clean up the lid detail which at present bears flaws.  Done in three parts, sad to think all the work will vanish under so much black paint.  Frightful photo image blurrily reproduced below.  Thanks again...

Mike K.



M.K.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 12:56:23 AM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #27 on: June 20, 2011, 01:15:09 AM »

Great that you have been able to find an alternative trunk lid. Here is a Craig Fisher photo of the rear of the car at Sebring in 1967. It shows how the rear stripes should be done, the screen replacing the white backup lenses, the wider red lenses than what is on the model and maybe a few other details for you to pick up on. The rear spoiler at Marlboro was taller than this stock one and the pinstripes were not done on the spoiler at Marlboro either. Also, that same filler cap as seen in this photo is used at Marlboro but it is much lower. Just above deck lid height. The hole is centered in the lid, both L-R and fore-to-aft (front edge of spoiler to front edge of trunk lid). There is maybe 3" of real-life clearance around that filler on the decklid and it has a bead of rubber to finish off the circumference of the hole.
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Jon Mello
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« Reply #28 on: June 20, 2011, 01:25:51 AM »

Mike, here's a photo of the steering wheel showing the word "THINK" on it. It was shown in the '67 Bryar Trans-Am program.
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #29 on: June 20, 2011, 12:33:10 PM »

Greetings Jon,

Thanks for the kind input, the very astute and valued observations afforded.  Very interesting both photographs, whereas I like the screen vent of the trunk area via the taillight cluster assembly - something I might not have noticed for a few weeks just examining said image.  Thanks very much for sourcing the photograph, indicating the venue, and pathfinding means to understand and interpret just what is being seen.  

The wrap of the steering wheel rim seems only to show up for the instrumented test session hosted by GM, whereas I think I might cut my wheel to fit something that might be finished to suggest wood.  I rue 'painting wood', and may look at other models or hobby supply sources to perhaps find a wooden rim to employ here.  I should be able to make better progress soon, having spent perhaps a bit too much time on the air cleaner assembly.  

-

Though a project not soon to be tackled, this weekend I picked up a 1:18 Yat Ming/Road Legend '69 Pontiac Trans Am (a dreary tool this) as well as a 1:18 Lane '68 Firebird (an exceptionally fine tool this) with the hope of eventually mating the stack of parts into a backdated '69/'68 Firebird Titus racer.  '69 shell, '68 hood scoops, faux '68 side trim, rear bubble flares (mild these), and the distinctive '68 'beak' fit to the panelwork of the new car.  Given the front bumper was painted (fiberglass replica or aluminum perhaps?), hacking and slashing to mate the same to the Yat Ming/Road Legends shell should be doable.  As an aside, I wonder how they homologated what seemed a Chevrolet Camaro rear spoiler?  It would be fun to have two - one the anticipated and ready to go '69 Tunnel Port 303-powered racer, the second what they were effectively forced to compete with as outlined above with Canadian Chevrolet/Acadian power.  Not to be seen soon, but parts being gathered for an elaborate future initiative.  Thanks so much...

Mike K.
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