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Author Topic: gray phosphate  (Read 3069 times)
sbmiano
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« on: December 11, 2013, 08:41:25 PM »

How do I paint something to achieve the gray phosphate color
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Mike S
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« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2013, 08:52:11 PM »

 I think Eastwood sells a paint to look like phosphate. I have seen the results and you can tell it is painted.


Mike
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cook_dw
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« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2013, 08:53:15 PM »

Edit:  Mike, you beat me to it..   Grin

There are paints that look like phosphate.  Eastwood is one company.  Phosphate is actually a chemical reaction and it creates a protective layer over the part.

 Click Me!!
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Darrell Cook

1967 LeMans Blue SS/RS L35 clone
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BULLITT65
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« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2013, 10:47:38 PM »

very informative link. It looks like the results can vary a bit, and it takes playing with it a bit to get the amount of sheen you want on your end product. Have you tried this little phosphate experiment yet Darrell?
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Charley
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« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2013, 01:17:00 AM »

http://www.palmettoenterprises.net/Palmetto_Enterprises/-Welcome-.html


Easy to use and cheap.
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BULLITT65
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« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2013, 01:30:49 AM »

On their website it says you have to heat to 210 degrees, are you placing the container on the stove, and then dipping? what was your process and can you post a pic of your results Charley?
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1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
Looking for 3192477 (front) spiral shocks 3192851 (rear) please
Looking for an original LOF soft ray windshield
Looking for original Delco side post negative battery cable part # 6297651AV
69Z28freak
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« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2013, 03:05:39 AM »

Here is some more info.

http://home.comcast.net/~rt66tbird/website/phosphate_etching.html
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Mike 1969 Grandma Camaro
cook_dw
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« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2013, 08:08:41 AM »

[
very informative link. It looks like the results can vary a bit, and it takes playing with it a bit to get the amount of sheen you want on your end product. Have you tried this little phosphate experiment yet Darrell?

I have and it does take a little while to get the results you want.


Charley, I do not see that the Palmetto is much different than the Phosphate Prep & Etch..  You use the same basic process..  Am I missing something?
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Darrell Cook

1967 LeMans Blue SS/RS L35 clone
1968 Rallye Green SS L78 - unrestored original
1968 Matador Red Z28
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« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2013, 08:47:55 AM »

I've everything ready ,and my products from Palmetto ,just have not had a chance to get out there. The quarts net a lot of product ,which per Scott can be re-used. The Manganese is mixed in more concentration than the phosphate ,but is said more durable. Hence the use on hood hinges/springs. He sends out an instruction sheet and personally answers any questions ASAP. Like one of the Mustang guys posted : dollar for dollar way cheaper than paint with correct results.



I plan on using a hot plate for small items.
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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2013, 09:49:19 AM »

I use a small one burner hot plate and a set of various sizes of SS pots I purchased at Walmart.    and the Palmetto chemical.  For small/med amounts of water, the hot plate works fine and heats up within a few min, but I tried once with a 3 gallon pot and I'm not sure I ever got to 200F using the hot plate.   I think it will be better to use a propane heater for larger amounts (and do it outside) - another use for the burner/stand taht I use for my turkey fryer!).. Smiley
The Process is:   1) heat water to 200-210F, 2) add appropriate amount of chemical, mix, then 3) submerge the part(s) - I generally try to circulate the solution or the part while it's in the bath.  4) upon removal, wash/dry parts in WD40 (3 times).   I generally spray down again with WD40 and put the part in a plastic ziplock bag until I'm ready to install.
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
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Mike S
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« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2013, 10:03:54 AM »

 I have only used 180-190 temps for phosphating. You don't want to start a boil or else you'll start to get crush developing in the pot and that is hard to clean out. I learned that the hard way until a gun restorer showed me that 210 is too close to boiling and after backing it down to 190 things went much better.
You will also want to use a diffuser under the pot to prevent hot spots from developing.

Mike
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67 LOS SS/RS L35 Hardtop - Original w/UOIT
67 NOR SS/RS L35 Convertible - Restored
69Z28-RS
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« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2013, 10:05:24 AM »

I have only used 180-190 temps for phosphating. You don't want to start a boil or else you'll start to get crush developing in the pot and that is hard to clean out. I learned that the hard way until a gun restorer showed me that 210 is too close to boiling and after backing it down to 190 things went much better.
You will also want to use a diffuser under the pot to prevent hot spots from developing.

I agree Mike.  If I get close to 200F, I'm happy with the temp.   What do you use as a diffuser?

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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
69 Corvette convertible, silver/black 350 hp,
60 Corvette white/red, 72 Corvette coupe (2), 
90 ZR1 red/red #246, 90 ZR1 white/gray #2466
72 El Camino, '55 Nomad, '57 Nomad, '57 B/A Sedan
Charley
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« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2013, 10:12:40 AM »

Cook....All I know is Palmetto was the first guy I found selling it years ago and he has kept it cheap and simple to use. You can get a stainless salad bowl or stainless pot at someplece like Walmart and cook bolt soup on your outdoor Gas bar-b-que.
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Mike S
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« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2013, 10:13:06 AM »

 I have a small pot with a copper bottom plating and for the larger pot I have what is called a 'stove top heat diffuser' I bought at a dollar store. I have seen them for sale on Amazon too.

Mike
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67 LOS SS/RS L35 Hardtop - Original w/UOIT
67 NOR SS/RS L35 Convertible - Restored
Petes L48
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« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2013, 10:13:25 AM »

Yep, turkey fryer works very well and you don't want to get much higher than 190.  I use a shallow SS serving pan or a porcelain finish cooking pot.      
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