Author Topic: gray phosphate  (Read 9808 times)

sbmiano

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gray phosphate
« on: December 12, 2013, 01:41:25 AM »
How do I paint something to achieve the gray phosphate color
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Mike S

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2013, 01:52:11 AM »
 I think Eastwood sells a paint to look like phosphate. I have seen the results and you can tell it is painted.


Mike
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cook_dw

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2013, 01:53:15 AM »
Edit:  Mike, you beat me to it..   ;D

There are paints that look like phosphate.  Eastwood is one company.  Phosphate is actually a chemical reaction and it creates a protective layer over the part.

 Click Me!!
Darrell Cook

BULLITT65

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2013, 03:47:38 AM »
very informative link. It looks like the results can vary a bit, and it takes playing with it a bit to get the amount of sheen you want on your end product. Have you tried this little phosphate experiment yet Darrell?
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Charley

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2013, 06:17:00 AM »

BULLITT65

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2013, 06:30:49 AM »
On their website it says you have to heat to 210 degrees, are you placing the container on the stove, and then dipping? what was your process and can you post a pic of your results Charley?
1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
-Looking for 3192477 (front) spiral shocks 3192851 (rear)
-Looking for an original LOF soft ray windshield
-Looking for original Delco side post negative battery cable part # 6297651AV

69Z28freak

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2013, 08:05:39 AM »
Mike 1969 Grandma Camaro

cook_dw

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2013, 01:08:41 PM »
[
very informative link. It looks like the results can vary a bit, and it takes playing with it a bit to get the amount of sheen you want on your end product. Have you tried this little phosphate experiment yet Darrell?

I have and it does take a little while to get the results you want.

http://www.palmettoenterprises.net/Palmetto_Enterprises/-Welcome-.html


Easy to use and cheap.

Charley, I do not see that the Palmetto is much different than the Phosphate Prep & Etch..  You use the same basic process..  Am I missing something?
Darrell Cook

janobyte

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2013, 01:47:55 PM »
I've everything ready ,and my products from Palmetto ,just have not had a chance to get out there. The quarts net a lot of product ,which per Scott can be re-used. The Manganese is mixed in more concentration than the phosphate ,but is said more durable. Hence the use on hood hinges/springs. He sends out an instruction sheet and personally answers any questions ASAP. Like one of the Mustang guys posted : dollar for dollar way cheaper than paint with correct results.



I plan on using a hot plate for small items.

69Z28-RS

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2013, 02:49:19 PM »
I use a small one burner hot plate and a set of various sizes of SS pots I purchased at Walmart.    and the Palmetto chemical.  For small/med amounts of water, the hot plate works fine and heats up within a few min, but I tried once with a 3 gallon pot and I'm not sure I ever got to 200F using the hot plate.   I think it will be better to use a propane heater for larger amounts (and do it outside) - another use for the burner/stand taht I use for my turkey fryer!).. :)
The Process is:   1) heat water to 200-210F, 2) add appropriate amount of chemical, mix, then 3) submerge the part(s) - I generally try to circulate the solution or the part while it's in the bath.  4) upon removal, wash/dry parts in WD40 (3 times).   I generally spray down again with WD40 and put the part in a plastic ziplock bag until I'm ready to install.
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Mike S

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2013, 03:03:54 PM »
 I have only used 180-190 temps for phosphating. You don't want to start a boil or else you'll start to get crush developing in the pot and that is hard to clean out. I learned that the hard way until a gun restorer showed me that 210 is too close to boiling and after backing it down to 190 things went much better.
You will also want to use a diffuser under the pot to prevent hot spots from developing.

Mike
67 LOS SS/RS L35 Hardtop - Original w/UOIT
67 NOR SS/RS L35 Convertible - Under restoration

69Z28-RS

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2013, 03:05:24 PM »
I have only used 180-190 temps for phosphating. You don't want to start a boil or else you'll start to get crush developing in the pot and that is hard to clean out. I learned that the hard way until a gun restorer showed me that 210 is too close to boiling and after backing it down to 190 things went much better.
You will also want to use a diffuser under the pot to prevent hot spots from developing.

I agree Mike.  If I get close to 200F, I'm happy with the temp.   What do you use as a diffuser?

Gary W / 09C 69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood tint
69 Corvette convertible, silver/black 350 hp,
60 Corvette white/red, 72 Corvette coupe, '70 Mach I 
90 ZR1 red/red #246, 90 ZR1 white/gray #2466
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Charley

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2013, 03:12:40 PM »
Cook....All I know is Palmetto was the first guy I found selling it years ago and he has kept it cheap and simple to use. You can get a stainless salad bowl or stainless pot at someplece like Walmart and cook bolt soup on your outdoor Gas bar-b-que.

Mike S

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2013, 03:13:06 PM »
 I have a small pot with a copper bottom plating and for the larger pot I have what is called a 'stove top heat diffuser' I bought at a dollar store. I have seen them for sale on Amazon too.

Mike
67 LOS SS/RS L35 Hardtop - Original w/UOIT
67 NOR SS/RS L35 Convertible - Under restoration

Petes L48

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Re: gray phosphate
« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2013, 03:13:25 PM »
Yep, turkey fryer works very well and you don't want to get much higher than 190.  I use a shallow SS serving pan or a porcelain finish cooking pot.