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Author Topic: Stripe delete  (Read 5613 times)
firstgenaddict
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« Reply #90 on: June 06, 2014, 11:38:06 PM »

Personally I love stripeless Z's I think they are the ultimate sleeper, with the flat hood & even moreso if D80 is omitted...
If they weren't behind you with an early 68 you'd have 302 emblems... put a 4.56 M20 in Ashgold sans stripes and it would be brutal at a stoplight, they'd never see it coming.
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James
Collectin' Camaro's since "Only Rednecks drove them"
 
Check out the Black 69 RS/Z28 45k mile Survivor and the Lemans Blue 69 Z 10D frame off...
https://picasaweb.google.com/112392262205377424364/1969_Z28_Restoration
janobyte
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« Reply #91 on: June 07, 2014, 06:55:00 AM »

That was the first owner's exact statement Smiley " Ordered it a Plain Jane sleeper"
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rare396bronze
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« Reply #92 on: June 07, 2014, 07:50:11 PM »

I have been a been a Camaro fan for along time. I try to help people out with question's about the Camaro when I can. I do not know it all that is why I like this group to learn more. I do a lot off research with part's books & assembly manuals. I do not try to offend anybody. But I did a lot off research on my car because I thought it was odd about the - on my cars trim tag when I bought in 1981. I mostly keep out off the conversation unless I now something is wrong. Been in Gm parts since 1986. I really enjoy this sight the people are real good people & that is what this group about helping people with information about the Camaro's 
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janobyte
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« Reply #93 on: June 07, 2014, 07:56:00 PM »

We're all learning, really cool when you learn something new about your car that separates it from the rest of the pack Smiley
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JoeC
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« Reply #94 on: June 10, 2014, 09:17:59 AM »

I know the conventional thinking is that the trim tag was only for Fisher body assembly but maybe there was a reason to have items on the trim tag that were not only for Fisher but also needed for scheduling the main line.

If you look at some of the engine and trans codes and other codes, I don't know if they  were all needed by Fisher.
A good example is the large number of option codes on 1967 Chevelle BAL trim tags.

In the example of the 68 dash no paint code for nose stripe delete cars ........
Fisher did not put on the nose stripe but maybe the trim tag still needed to show a stripe delete Camaro.

A possible reason would be for some of the "scheduling rules" JohnZ  mentions in the research report on the assembly process.

If the special paint and other special order cars need more time or special tracking to meet special parts, process, or something else, that info would need to be considered when they were put into sequence. For example they may have needed to be sequenced together in some cases for assembly efficiency or paint efficiency but in other cases may have needed to be separated because of higher work station cycle/dwell times.

Even though Fisher would not have to know what nose stripe was used or not used, the trim tag may still needed to have the build order info on it for the scheduling.

here are quotes from JohnZ's report on assembly that I am referencing .......

"Scheduling:  There were usually six lines in the schedule bank - one for RS, one for A/C, one for SS and Z/28, and three for high-volume standard cars, so cars could be scheduled without having situations like three A/C's in a row, three consoles in a row, three RS's in a row, etc., as these had higher work content vs. the standard cars and scheduling two or three of them in a row would over-cycle certain line operations. "

 "Releasing:  When the clerk at the end of the body bank selected the next body based on the scheduling "rules" and released it from its line into the main conveyor to the Trim Line, the computer released the "Broadcast" file with the next sequence number, and it was sent to many teletype printers throughout the plant where subassemblies were built and sequenced for delivery to the Main Line to meet up with that particular car. The same computer program also generated the end-of-line paperwork for that car - the price sticker, car shipper, and other internal documents. "
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JohnZ
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« Reply #95 on: June 10, 2014, 09:52:54 AM »

I know the conventional thinking is that the trim tag was only for Fisher body assembly but maybe there was a reason to have items on the trim tag that were not only for Fisher but also needed for scheduling the main line.
In the example of the 68 dash no paint code for nose stripe delete cars ........
Fisher did not put on the nose stripe but maybe the trim tag still needed to show a stripe delete Camaro.

A possible reason would be for some of the "scheduling rules" JohnZ  mentions in the research report on the assembly process.

If the special paint and other special order cars need more time or special tracking to meet special parts, process, or something else, that info would need to be considered when they were put into sequence. For example they may have needed to be sequenced together in some cases for assembly efficiency or paint efficiency but in other cases may have needed to be separated because of higher work station cycle/dwell times.

Even though Fisher would not have to know what nose stripe was used or not used, the trim tag may still needed to have the build order info on it for the scheduling.

here are quotes from JohnZ's report on assembly that I am referencing .......

"Scheduling:  There were usually six lines in the schedule bank - one for RS, one for A/C, one for SS and Z/28, and three for high-volume standard cars, so cars could be scheduled without having situations like three A/C's in a row, three consoles in a row, three RS's in a row, etc., as these had higher work content vs. the standard cars and scheduling two or three of them in a row would over-cycle certain line operations. "

 "Releasing:  When the clerk at the end of the body bank selected the next body based on the scheduling "rules" and released it from its line into the main conveyor to the Trim Line, the computer released the "Broadcast" file with the next sequence number, and it was sent to many teletype printers throughout the plant where subassemblies were built and sequenced for delivery to the Main Line to meet up with that particular car. The same computer program also generated the end-of-line paperwork for that car - the price sticker, car shipper, and other internal documents. "


The point not to be missed here is that there were TWO separate organizations doing production scheduling, with two totally different sets of priorities. Chevrolet dictated to Fisher Body which bodies they wanted each day, and Fisher Body had to schedule those units in a manner that best fit their system and scheduling priorities, most of which didn't affect Chevrolet operations.

Once Chevrolet received the bodies from Fisher, the Chevrolet scheduling rules and priorities took over, and that process was managed by the Body Bank operators, releasing units into the Chevrolet assembly system based on proper labor line balance and option workload distribution. Chevrolet didn't need anything from Fisher to understand what each unit required - they already had the dealer order with all the specs for each car, which Chevrolet transmitted to Fisher Body weeks before the body was scheduled to be built.

Each Fisher plant put whatever they wanted to on the cowl tag based on how they managed their own scheduling process, and nobody on the Chevrolet side of the plant cared what was on the tag nor did they ever even look at it - the only item on the cowl tag Chevrolet cared about was the Body Number, which the clerk wrote down at the entry to the Body Bank; that number was the direct link to that car's Chevrolet dealer order, and generated the Chevrolet Body and Chassis Broadcast Copies when the body was released from the bank.
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'69 Z/28
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bc69
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« Reply #96 on: June 10, 2014, 11:23:01 AM »

So in making sure I have taken all this in and understood properly....the only thing common from start to finish on one car that each dept see is the broadcast sheet. Correct? Fisher works off this as well as GM? So to really know for sure
About deletes such as nose stripes it would be on the broadcast sheet.
Say a z stripe delete might show up on cowl because that would effect what fisher had to do, but nose delete may not because it doesn't concern them?
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Brad
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firstgenaddict
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« Reply #97 on: June 10, 2014, 03:13:31 PM »

This may be another point if so admin please move to appropriate category.
Referencing Camaro Assembly Process auth -JohnZ
specifically Vin Assignment.

Once Chevrolet received the bodies from Fisher, (1 VIN)the Chevrolet scheduling rules and priorities took over, and that process was managed by the Body Bank operators, releasing units (or 2 VIN) into the Chevrolet assembly system based on proper labor line balance and option workload distribution.

John where exactly was the vin assigned?
1. immediately upon receipt numerically in order from Fisher or
2. after being scheduled and released into Chev Assem based on line balance etc?
3. other

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James
Collectin' Camaro's since "Only Rednecks drove them"
 
Check out the Black 69 RS/Z28 45k mile Survivor and the Lemans Blue 69 Z 10D frame off...
https://picasaweb.google.com/112392262205377424364/1969_Z28_Restoration
KurtS
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« Reply #98 on: June 10, 2014, 10:14:00 PM »

1.
Body passed thru the wall, was stamped with the VIN, and then was put in the body bank. VIN and body # were used to generate the broadcast sheets.

Fisher never saw the broadcast sheets. They were generated after the body left Fisher. See the article for details.
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Kurt S
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Mark
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« Reply #99 on: June 11, 2014, 06:05:53 AM »

But Fisher had their own version of a broadcast sheet that told the workers what to add to the car, it was removed from the tub before the body was sent over to Chevrolet.
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Mark C.
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firstgenaddict
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« Reply #100 on: June 11, 2014, 08:56:26 AM »

Mark
Was that the UOIT? or something else?
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James
Collectin' Camaro's since "Only Rednecks drove them"
 
Check out the Black 69 RS/Z28 45k mile Survivor and the Lemans Blue 69 Z 10D frame off...
https://picasaweb.google.com/112392262205377424364/1969_Z28_Restoration
JohnZ
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« Reply #101 on: June 11, 2014, 09:27:31 AM »

So in making sure I have taken all this in and understood properly....the only thing common from start to finish on one car that each dept see is the broadcast sheet. Correct? Fisher works off this as well as GM? So to really know for sure
About deletes such as nose stripes it would be on the broadcast sheet.
Say a z stripe delete might show up on cowl because that would effect what fisher had to do, but nose delete may not because it doesn't concern them?

The Broadcast copy was only seen by Chevrolet - it didn't exist until after the body was delivered by Fisher Body; Fisher had their own internal version, called the UOIT.

Nose stripes didn't affect Fisher, so they weren't on the cowl tag; Z/28 stripes DID affect Fisher.
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'69 Z/28
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cook_dw
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« Reply #102 on: June 11, 2014, 10:56:04 AM »

What about in the situation of the door decal stripe of the D90?
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Darrell Cook

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1968 Matador Red Z28
Mark
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« Reply #103 on: June 11, 2014, 11:58:43 AM »

All done by GM.  Other than color, only D96 stripes,  Z28 stripes, and black tail panel for big blocks would be affected by a special paint order.
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Mark C.
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rare396bronze
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« Reply #104 on: June 12, 2014, 12:39:30 AM »

I just looked on this groups site went to numbers decode then special paint link there is nothing about black tail panel delete! But does talk about stripe delete being special paint car and talks about -codes where paint code should be. Also talked to the original again since this started he said again car was stripe delete but had black tail panel. Cant wait to get finished and put the top done and go for a ride
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