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Poll
Question: Which age group do you fall in to?
60-69 - 29 (23%)
50-59 - 57 (45.2%)
40-49 - 25 (19.8%)
30-39 - 11 (8.7%)
20-29 - 1 (0.8%)
0-19 - 0 (0%)
70-79 - 3 (2.4%)
80-89 - 0 (0%)
90-100 - 0 (0%)
Total Voters: 126

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Author Topic: Age Groups of Our Hobby  (Read 5245 times)
cook_dw
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« Reply #30 on: December 12, 2013, 09:46:56 AM »

FYI everyone.

If you need to change your age group steve68 has change the poll so it can be done.  Thanks Steve!
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Darrell Cook

1967 LeMans Blue SS/RS L35 clone
1968 Rallye Green SS L78 - unrestored original
1968 Matador Red Z28
BillOhio
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« Reply #31 on: December 12, 2013, 11:56:55 AM »

Interesting that the majority are people that saw these new or slightly used. I am 47 and didn't really see many when I was in high school. New cars I saw were 1984ish. I had a new trans am with the 180 hp or so 305! Horrible motor. I would never want another. New cars now have the performance but don't hold their value and I could hardly get out of the ZL 1 I sat in lol. It was hard to see out of. It will be a few years before young people drop 50,000 on a newer muscle car. New or old they cost too much.
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1969 Z28, Burgandy, numbers matching, 12,900 miles
1967 Plymouth GTX Hemi, 4 speed, dana
1961 Chrysler 300G convertible
janobyte
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« Reply #32 on: December 12, 2013, 12:14:15 PM »

And there you have it--do they really understand what changing the chip is actually doing ,probably not. Uggg--one of my older kid's buddy asked the HP of the Anglia--mean avg. of dyno pulls was 680 flywheel@7200. So he tells me he's building a 800hp 4 banger Honda to run in the 8's on NOS. Ha-one of my last times running the Z put one on the trailer when he hit the button to catch me---blew out the bottom end. Point is having been in and out of drag racing for years consistency and RELIABILITY wins rounds. I read the writings of an engine builder ,I think Sonny, who said you can easily make good HP---once, doing it over and over is the trick. I think that kid would have been a lot wiser watching and helping you out with that cam change Mike.
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cook_dw
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« Reply #33 on: December 12, 2013, 12:49:19 PM »

And there you have it--do they really understand what changing the chip is actually doing ,probably not. Uggg--one of my older kid's buddy asked the HP of the Anglia--mean avg. of dyno pulls was 680 flywheel@7200. So he tells me he's building a 800hp 4 banger Honda to run in the 8's on NOS.

You can thank hollywood for that..  Tell him 8's for a honda would be respectable in the 1/8th..  lol 
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Darrell Cook

1967 LeMans Blue SS/RS L35 clone
1968 Rallye Green SS L78 - unrestored original
1968 Matador Red Z28
MyRed67
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« Reply #34 on: December 12, 2013, 05:33:55 PM »

Like I've recently posted: let them kids get in there and "play" with the tools. A disturbing trend with the younger guys coming on my department is they have no mechanical knowledge what so ever. Or any other trade---too much xbox. I had a young guy scared to check the battery on a truck ,thought he'd get shocked. I yelled are you @#@ with me  ? He truly was embarrassed. Had to show him he would be alright. Double major from college, turning out to be a good firefighter and knows the trucks now. I introduced another one to the $$ savings in doing your own auto repair--he's now assembled a nice little garage in money saved---and proud of what he's working on. I guess having a father who was an industrial mechanic paid off a bit.(not always fun)

Bigger picture, problem solving and analytical skill sets are developed ,not to mention knowledge in physical science---explain how and why. Plus the 'cool pictures' when they were little! And your spending time with your kids.  win-win at any age
  I have swapped and rebuilt motors and Trans. with all 3 of my boys.  And have taught my 2 girls how to check all fluids, etc. under the hood, and they have come back to thank me.
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1967 Camaro  LOS  11A
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Mike C.    NW - Illinois
sdkar
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« Reply #35 on: December 12, 2013, 05:55:15 PM »

Am I reading the survey results right...?  NO ONE UNDER 30?  And less than 7% under age 40?  OMG...please say I am not seeing it right...that I missed something.

From this survey, I am in the "younger" group as I am in my 40's.  I have onwed a first gen Camaro since I was a teenager, and can not imagine not having one.  As it is now, I have two 69's, and think it quite normal.   I suppose that one day 20 years or so from now, these cars will be had for real cheap, as there will be very few people wanting to own one.  Sadly, none of the younger guys seem to want them.  

I blame this sad trend on first lame dads not taking their sons to a car show or teaching them how to work on cars, thus insuring they will be victims of unscrupulous mechanics for the rest of their lives.  When I was a teenager, I learned how to work on my car out of necessity.  I couldn't afford some garage to change my brakes, oil change, or other fix, so I did it myself.  Not to mention, at the rate I broke stuff, I had to learn how to make repairs, sometimes on the side of the road with very few tools.  I had the notion that if the moron working on my car at the mechanic shop could do it, so could I.  Next thing I knew, I was building entire cars.  

I also blame this on the big car companies not giving the younger crowd anything to get excited about.  I can't speak for all of you, but in my opinion, there isn't a car worth a damn built after 1973, save for a few exceptions.  These crappy junk boxes did nothing to get the next generation of kids wanting one.  Compound this with the fact that these cars were way too complicated, no horsepower, and could not be made to go fast easily or cheaply (Thank you Ralph Nader).  Add in the explosion of cars from Japan with the societal push to go green and drive small affordable, 4-banger economy boxes, and the fact they were making cars that did not break as often or need maintenace like those of the muscle car era.  Kids no longer "needed" to know how to work on their cars.  

I know guys who have never lifted the hood of their car, and have no desire to.  I find this amazing.  Of course, these are the same guys that think they own a comprehensive set of tools becasue they have a $10 box of Taiwan sockets, two screwdrivers, and a cheap pair of pliers.  They couldn't change their own wiper blades if you held a gun to their heads.  It is really no wonder why very few later generations got into cars...no one showed them, and there was just plain nothing to get excited about.  

Look at stock car racing.  Used to be these events got kids exicted about buying a car.  The old saying "Win on Sunday, buy on Monday" (or something like that).  Well, stock cars starting in the late 70's were not very stock.  Nowadays, remove the fiberglass bodies, and they all look the same.  No longer could you even think of buying anything at the dealership that even closely related to the cars at the races.  

Sadly, like the drive in theater, hang out diner, gas station mechanic, and chrome, enthusiasm for muscle cars is dying.  I consider myself lucky to have grown up loving old cars, my ability to fix them up, and getting into the car crowd.  I have never had a mechanic pull one over on me, that is, for the very few times I needed to even go to one (Usually new car warranty nonsense where they try to sell me some stupid repair amazingly NOT covered by the warranty).  

Anyway, I agree with the idea of getting the younger kids interested.  My next show, I am going to let a few rugrats hop in behind the steering wheel (gently of course) and see if that will help ignite a sparkle in their eyes.      
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lakeholme
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« Reply #36 on: December 12, 2013, 07:12:28 PM »

On Saturday of our Autofairs, we have a morning and an afternoon youth program to interest pre-teens in classic cars.  About six years ago the guy in charge switched from using fifties cars (or earlier) to nineties cars, and the attendance tripled.  Why?  Because nineties cars will be the classics cars when these kids are old enough to buy/restore one.  Baby Boomer car guys and gals were starting to drive and/or buy cars when the First Gen Camaros were the craze. 
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Phillip
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"Charlotte AutoFair, presented by the Hornets Nest Region, AACA, is the largest and greatest Collector Vehicle Event in the Southeast USA."
cook_dw
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« Reply #37 on: December 12, 2013, 07:14:07 PM »

I have to be honest.  Im not surprised by the poll.  I am 35 and I am a little different than most every other person my age.  Growing up my father was my hero and when he was out in the garage working on his or someone elses car I was right there with him.  Going to junkyards, swap meets, car shows and cruise-ins were the norm for me.  All the people that I talk to and hang out with are older because the people my age do not have the same interest as myself and all of you here.  Before I moved back to TN I lived in Bowling Green, KY and while there the big things were and still are the LS cars of the late 90's through todays cars and I actually did a lot of high performance tuning and building of these cars through our performance shop.  If I were a betting man I would venture to say that the current and next generation will have the same interests and desires as we do with the 60's muscle but with the 4th and 5th generation Camaros.  I am afraid that these cars will eventually become as another has said of the post war and 50's cars..  I hope I am wrong but with the increase of prices due to auction houses and people willing to spend stupid money for a car has eliminated most of the "normal folks" that may love the cars equally but do not have the financial abilities.  The another sad thing is the the knowledge of these cars is eventually going to dwindle to just a handful of folks that had the same interests as their parents or relatives or someone that sparked that desire of wanting to understand and fill there minds of the knowledge.

Again I hope I am wrong but this is just an opinion.   
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Darrell Cook

1967 LeMans Blue SS/RS L35 clone
1968 Rallye Green SS L78 - unrestored original
1968 Matador Red Z28
BULLITT65
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« Reply #38 on: December 12, 2013, 08:08:14 PM »

Man you guys are depressing me here... Cry A couple of us have sons and or grandsons were doing our part to get tools in their hands or cars (hot wheels) on their brains. My daughters also play the car game of pointing out classics when were on the road, and luckily by the time I am deemed to old to drive my vehicles I can then have all of my "student" drivers who will be in their 30's or 40's take me around in my old cars, and hopefully some of their own classics. I figure I am just getting started on building a fleet for them to learn on, or learn from. I have no problems giving kids rides in my vehicles, but until all of mine are potty trained, I don't have a lot of extra time to bring a car to a car show.

They have finished their homework and are all playing right now, so I got enough time to type this out... Smiley

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1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
Looking for 3192477 (front) spiral shocks 3192851 (rear) please
Looking for an original LOF soft ray windshield
Looking for original Delco side post negative battery cable part # 6297651AV
Dusk_Blue_Z
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« Reply #39 on: December 12, 2013, 08:29:42 PM »

I'm 32, so pretty close to the 20-30 age group Smiley I've told my story before, I think there's been a few threads over the years similar to this one. Fortunately for me, my dad has always been a car guy. The 'trick' was taking me to car shows and occasionally the track. In my teens/20's, I was more interested in sports (what my friends were into), but still enjoyed cars. I had zero technical ability back then. It wasn't until a few years ago I rediscovered the old Camaro that had lingered around the garage during my childhood. My dad and I restored it, learned a tremendous amount along the way (insert CRG plug here!). Wouldn't trade it for the world. Now I refuse to buy a new vehicle as a daily driver, I'm finding enjoyment in seeing how long I can keep my old Explorer running (by doing my own service on it). My friends laugh at my wheels, but I take pride in keeping it running. Anyone car buy a new, reliable car. Takes someone skilled to keep an old one going down the road.

Common thread seems to be getting kids engaged at a young age, whether it be car shows, taking them for a ride, etc. Maybe next time you take your kid to a show, make them bring a few friends Smiley

Don't rip too much on the Fast & Furious movies, they've starred some pretty sweet old iron.
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1969 X77 01B 51 51 flat hood
janobyte
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« Reply #40 on: December 12, 2013, 08:44:44 PM »

Stands to reason the 50-60 year olds are leading the poll here---you were the big kids in the neighborhood when I was wrenching on bikes! My dad who is 68 owned but had no real love of muscle cars---he's into gassers and hot rods. Cars he wanted to build when he was a  teen. My son's passion are pre 98 Ford pick ups. Says when he graduates college looking for a 96-97 power stroke out west. Treats his 90 F150 Lariat like a show truck.

And yes ,I agree lazy parenting has led to lazy kids. My generation's mistake. Not all of us though.
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DavidS
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« Reply #41 on: December 12, 2013, 09:23:14 PM »

As my son is getting older, he's starting to get more interested in cars.  It's not easy though since he like to spend his free time with TV and video games.  I drag him to car shows, out crusing around the neighborhood, and have him help out.

Last week he asked me who gets my Camaros when I die.  lol.  I guess he might be a little more interested than I initially thought.

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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #42 on: December 12, 2013, 09:52:21 PM »

I tell my kids and grandkids that I'll probably have to *turn my cars into food* in my retirement..  Smiley
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
69 Corvette convertible, silver/black 350 hp,
60 Corvette white/red, 72 Corvette coupe (2), 
90 ZR1 red/red #246, 90 ZR1 white/gray #2466
72 El Camino, '55 Nomad, '57 Nomad, '57 B/A Sedan
BULLITT65
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« Reply #43 on: December 12, 2013, 09:58:43 PM »

did you tell him your going to buried in it???  Cheesy (great photo)
I have already started telling my kids they need to pick out their own ride that we can fix up. They just saw me turn out a convertible, so they are starting to realize you can shine these old cars up like an old penny, you don't need to start off with a polished gem. So in about 10 years I have the idea of a base car (60's mustang camaro cuda, or a shoe box) and then making a nice clone: yenko shelby RT. they can drive it beat on it whatever if something happens to it, it won't be the end of the world. Then if they want to do another we can get a little more serious. They will learn a lot and as Dusk blue stated they will know a bit on how to keep it on the road, and any other vehicle for that matter.
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1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
Looking for 3192477 (front) spiral shocks 3192851 (rear) please
Looking for an original LOF soft ray windshield
Looking for original Delco side post negative battery cable part # 6297651AV
BULLITT65
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« Reply #44 on: December 12, 2013, 10:01:43 PM »

I tell my kids and grandkids that I'll probably have to *turn my cars into food* in my retirement..  Smiley

Gary I think you could eat well just by selling one!
just depends on your appetite ....
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1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
Looking for 3192477 (front) spiral shocks 3192851 (rear) please
Looking for an original LOF soft ray windshield
Looking for original Delco side post negative battery cable part # 6297651AV
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