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| | |-+  What type of sealer and filler to use on roof drip rails and roof line filler?
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Author Topic: What type of sealer and filler to use on roof drip rails and roof line filler?  (Read 3613 times)
sdkar
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« on: May 16, 2012, 04:46:31 PM »

hey guys,

After installing a new roof panel on a 69 Camaro...what products are recommended for the quarter panel seems that I believe the factory used to put lead in?  Also, what type of sealer is recommended for the driprails?

Thanks,

Steve
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Mike S
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« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2012, 05:12:02 PM »

Hi Steve,

  Are you doing the work yourself? I can't comment on the drip rail sealer, but for the quarter sail seems I recommend lead.
I do lead work and it's easy to do. It's just as easy and fast as using a regular polyester filler but more permanent. Eastwood sells the leading tools.
Otherwise a poly filler will do if the thickness is only a few 1/16ths

Mike
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67 LOS SS/RS L35 Hardtop - Original w/UOIT
67 NOR SS/RS L35 Convertible - Restored
sdkar
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« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2012, 07:36:03 PM »

I am doing it myself, but it is thicker than 1/16".  I have been told there is some type of metal filler that would work perfectly for this.  I also need to re-radius one of the rear window corners to fit the chrome molding better and want to use the same stuff if it will do the trick.  Finally, I am going to use the same stuff to make my door gaps a perfect 3/16" and wil need something a little heavier duty than just regular ole bondo. 

So, what stuff do you recommend?

Thanks.

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Mike S
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« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2012, 07:53:55 PM »

  When I said a few 1/16ths....I meant the thickness of the poly filler shouldn't exceed no more than 1/4". Thinner is always better.
Anything above that thickness and you risk paint film cracking and/or feather edge lifting due to the fillers thermo expansion and contraction coefficient when compared to sheet metal.
If applied correctly it will last the life of the car. If the sail areas and wheel opening welds have been done correctly then there should be no flex stresses which can lead to paint film failures so bondo will work fine.
The 'Bondo' today is actually a very good product. The Bondo made by 3M is more than adequate when applied correctly.

Mike
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67 LOS SS/RS L35 Hardtop - Original w/UOIT
67 NOR SS/RS L35 Convertible - Restored
Sauron327
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2012, 08:44:03 PM »

For decades I've used Duraglass in the sails followed by filler with zero failures. I prefer Marson Platinum over the mass marketed Rage. It applies and sands better. Another method is actually bridging that sail valley with a piece of metal, welding it, and grinding to virtually elimate any filler except a skimcoat.

There are different methods to close the gap on the quarters. They depend on whether the panels are GM or not. Some (most) repro quarters lack edge definition at the door jamb and their radii are too large. Welding overlapping spots on the edge allows you to make the edge crisp. Doing so will close the gap; a large radius gives the appearance of a gap greater than 3/16". Primer and paint thickness must also be taken into account when pre gapping. The other method involves slicing the quarter at the jamb and either closing or widening the gap. Even though it's near an edge and not prone to excessive warpage, care with heat when welding must be taken. Or another choice is adding 1/8" filler rod to the edge. Some add material to the door edge but a wide door hem looks bad. If your doors are original it's best to mod a repro quarter than the GM known good door.

Never use filler on an edge to establish gaps or for any kind of edge repair. Your moldings should be fitted using weld, not filler, to make them fit.

You may be referring to "All Metal". A clever name used as a marketing ploy to lead consumers to believe it's panacea and substitute for proper metalworking techniques. Duraglass is fine. Shortstrand, not longstrand.

3M Duramix control flow 08329 is good for the driprail. It's 2K and you need a dispensor gun. SEM and Lord Fusor offer similar products.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012, 09:14:00 PM by Sauron327 » Logged
Mike S
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« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2012, 09:20:32 PM »

  Sauron is right about not using any poly filler for an edge. I didn't follow through that portion of my answer and instead stayed focused on the sails in my reply.
One door edge I wound up grinding away almost 2/16th" near the top curve after installing a NOS fender in the 80's and having only a 1/16" gap and it wasn't linear. I then mig welded and finished grind and used a flat Sheffield steel file to reestablish a straight but rounded edge after all the door hinge alignments failed.

Mike
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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2012, 12:30:12 PM »

Sauron mentioned 'All Metal', which I've used a long time in the past.   It's basically 'bondo' with embedded metallic dust.   It appears 'gray' rather than white or pink like bondo.  The only advantage I could glean from use of All-Metal rather than bondo is perhaps a slightly better matched coefficient of thermal expansion with the Al-metal, due to the metallic particles in it.

Sauron:  Did you intend any other conclusion re the All Metal?  I got the feeling you like the fiber embedded versions rather than the metal dust embedded??

Gary / 69Z28-RS
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
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Sauron327
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« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2012, 05:49:40 AM »

If All Metal works in the sail for you, keep using it. Duraglass or other short strands have not failed me. All Metal is often incorrectly used as substitute for metal replacement when rot is encountered. Some read the name and are under the impression it's magic in a can. I've read it numerous times.

I don't use Bondo, it's garbage. I use a quality body filler.
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