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Author Topic: Chevrolet assembly process pictures  (Read 4461 times)
KurtS
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« on: November 25, 2008, 12:19:16 AM »

http://images.google.com/images?q=chevrolet+tarrytown+factory+source:life
Here's an great set of pics of a typical Chevrolet assembly plant. It's 59, but same thing as 69.

JohnZ had a few comments:
Quote
What you see in those photos is essentially the same process that was used at Norwood and Van Nuys, with two exceptions:

1. At Tarrytown, the assembled front clip was installed after the body was dropped on the chassis on the Final Line (the standard method for full-frame cars in most plants in those days); at Norwood and Van Nuys, the assembled front clip was attached to the body *before* the chassis and body were joined, with the body in an overhead conveyor carrier.

2. At Tarrytown, the body was dropped on the chassis on the Final Line (standard full-frame process in those days); at Norwood and Van Nuys, the chassis was *raised up* to the body with the body (and assembled front clip) six feet in the air in an overhead conveyor carrier.

Other than those two changes, you could substitute the Camaro for the '59 Chevy in almost any of those photos and it would represent the assembly process at either Norwood or Van Nuys.

John
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Kurt S
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« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2008, 01:27:15 AM »

   Amazing pictures - I had an uncle who worked as a photographer for a very large advertising agency that did all of the Canadian GM layouts in the largest newspapers and magazines in the fifties and sixties. He was able to tour any and all GM assembly plants in Ontario and Northern US at will to photograph the newest models each year and always got his choice of vehicle to drive at any time on the premise that he could shoot it in varied situations and lighting for his work - good job eh?. As an example I recall him with a '67 yellow 435 hp Vette coupe with M22 and black interior and side pipes from Gorries in Toronto for a weekend ride / photo session...
   His stories and descriptions of how the cars were put together always left me spellbound when I was a kid through the fifties and sixties and these pictures certainly help put in perspective what he was trying to convey about the plants and how they operated.
   I was always (and still am to some degree) amazed at how all of the different parts could come together so colors, options, and model choices worked out as planned. I have to assume there must have been some screwups along the way occasionally!
   These pictures from the late fifties also show the lack of PPE required then as opposed to what today is required in the workplace. I'm sure all will agree that we will never see situations where so much 'hands-on' labor will ever be required to assemble anything again - as I would assume that on today's assembly lines (as fast as they are shrinking) the human element as shown in these images is virtually non existant in comparison...
   Thanks for this - very very interesting...  Randy 
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JohnKY
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« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2008, 07:02:44 AM »

Anybody know the purpose of this light (heat?) tunnel?

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=671e00cfcd781fc6&q=chevrolet+tarrytown+factory+source:life&usg=__pWT2ZNj0C39KICN2C4Jh04f7-qI=&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dchevrolet%2Btarrytown%2Bfactory%2Bsource:life%26start%3D18%26ndsp%3D18%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN
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tom
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« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2008, 09:31:44 AM »

cure the paint
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69 X11 Z21 L14 glide
looking for a 69 export model (KPH) speedo
JohnZ
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« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2008, 10:29:46 AM »

That's a lo-temp (150*) infra-red oven in the Final Paint Repair system where touch-ups and spot repairs were done on finished cars and trucks.
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'69 Z/28
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« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2008, 01:06:06 PM »

Is there any assembley photos for the 67-69f-body besides the one showing the roof skin being installed?
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GM parts-tech. Polar Chevrolet White Bear Lake, Mn
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« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2008, 07:45:51 PM »

Is there any assembley photos for the 67-69f-body besides the one showing the roof skin being installed?

Here's one at the Van Nuys plant...

Paul
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KurtS
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« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2008, 08:06:30 PM »

Is there any assembley photos for the 67-69f-body besides the one showing the roof skin being installed?
Yes, I have several that I'm gonna add to John's assembly article.
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Kurt S
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« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2008, 09:33:58 PM »

After looking at the pics I am so amazed. I have just found a new higher level of facination towards my car as well as the other that I own. Thanks for sharing  them. Please post more!! Any pics john for the Corvettes Hint Hint 1970
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JohnKY
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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2008, 06:59:50 AM »

I noticed that the rear of the 283 engines appear to be a different casting than later small blocks. A rounded bell housing flange instead of triangular. Or, is this just an adapter bolted to the block for a cast iron Powerglide?
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CNorton
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« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2008, 10:01:29 AM »

The cast iron PG bolted to the block with an adaptor flange.  The bell housing bolt pattern on the 283 was not different.  As I recall, the adaptor flange had mounts that supported the weight of the rear of the engine and the transmission.  There were no side motor mounts on the blocks cast in the early years.  Of course, the iron PG was very heavy and needed the support since the front  was mounted using a "foot" that bolted to the four 3/8" holes just above the pan rail, two on either side of the harmonic damper.
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CVKUEBER
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« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2008, 12:57:37 PM »

Kurts, Will you be posting the pictures anytime soon? Thanks, Cory
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GM parts-tech. Polar Chevrolet White Bear Lake, Mn
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« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2008, 02:35:05 PM »

Cool pictures Kurt. Thanks for sharing
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KurtS
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« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2008, 10:02:46 AM »

Kurts, Will you be posting the pictures anytime soon? Thanks, Cory
Not at my current rate of progress....  Just being realistic. Smiley
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Kurt S
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