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Author Topic: Cylinder blocks  (Read 1508 times)
69er
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« on: April 28, 2007, 11:53:59 AM »

Jerry,

I have noticed that the pricing of cylinder blocks with the correct casting numbers and dates
for first generation z28's sometimes go for very high prices. I understand why this would
be so for restoration purposes. But, on the other hand taking the point of view from a
technical standing, what is wrong with purchasing a brand new small block with 4 bolt mains
from GM. When you buy a brand new block, you get a standard bore, the mains should be
straight and no cracks.

Is this an option if you have a early z and are going to be restoring it?

69er
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william
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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2007, 02:38:30 PM »

If you do not have the original engine the next best thing is a period correct engine. For a '69 it takes a bit of investigation and searching since 4 casting #s were used during the model run. By now many are no longer rebuildable. But you have to expend the effort if the car is to be presented as restored; an 06A 69 Z/28 should have a May '69 '010' casting for example.

You can certainly acquire a new block from GM and build it as a 302 but many will regard the car as more of a street machine and value it accordingly.

Having said all that if I had one today the OE 302 would be in a bag in the corner of the garage. In the car would be a correct-appearing 9:1 350 with a roller cam.
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Jerry@CHP
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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2007, 09:16:24 AM »

If you have a nice car that is very original, you are always better off getting a dated original engine block for the car.  Installing a new engine will put the value and authentcity in the toilet.  If you don't care about the investment potential or originality, then you can do what you wish but installing a new engine in any original Z28 or SS today is foolish.  Just my opinion as a hobbyist and certified master appraiser.

One of the members in our Camaro club installed a GM target engine in his 1969 Camaro.  $#%^%&^&*^#$@#$!!@!!!!!!  I couldn't believe it.  And neither could many of the members in our club.  He finally wised up and found a dated original 350-300 engine and installed that.

Jerry
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69er
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2007, 10:50:57 AM »

I agreee jerry with what you are saying. Getting a correct period dated block is best. But, would a temporary
solution be to purchase just the bare block and bolt on the remaining origianl components to the block?

I just thought that as a solution you buy a brand new block use your original parts, you might need new
pistons, but the rest would be original until you find that block.

Any thoughts?

69er

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