Author Topic: This hobby is dying  (Read 3601 times)

MO

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2022, 03:48:07 AM »
The key is to own what you like regardless of value. That way when/if the value falls, you won't be disappointed, you'll still have the car of your dreams.

GMAD_Van Nuys

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2022, 04:18:51 PM »
I was talking to someone at our local monthly cars & coffee show on Saturday as he was interested in buying a 1965/1966 Mustang fastback to restore with his daughter, who was just hired at JPL in Pasadena, CA.  It turns out that he had 2 1970 Cudas that he bought in the early 1980s, one was a 440, the other being a 426 Hemi.  Both cars had been sitting in the garage since the 1980s and needed some attention, but he hadn't gotten around to working on them.

David K

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2022, 12:28:24 AM »
Thinking Restoration on the ‘Cuda is the better way to go.

BULLITT65

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2022, 04:36:26 PM »
The key is to own what you like regardless of value. That way when/if the value falls, you won't be disappointed, you'll still have the car of your dreams.
great point.
I think here are new fans of classic cars everyday coming out of the woodwork. *BUT keep in mind there are another round of new cars coming out every year, that are eye candy to some new generation. Trends come and go, but at worst a classic car from any decade may plateau a bit, but most of them rebound and keep pace with the overall market. 4 doors wagons,  being restored or preserved only proves there is a strong attraction to older cars(older truck market 60s-90s is red hot). Plus the 20 yr old cars that are now legal to import to the U.S. My coworkers were just talking about the Ford Focus RS (import track monster) 40k equivalent price in the UK, which seems nuts to me. 

Thing is there are so many options of course classic cars will get watered down, but they are a staple and proven blue chip, AND they aren't making any more of them. 🙂
1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
-Looking for 3192477 (front) spiral shocks 3192851 (rear)
-Looking for an original LOF soft ray windshield
-Looking for original Delco side post negative battery cable part # 6297651AV

crossboss

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2022, 05:54:59 AM »
Went to my local Cars & Coffee this Sunday. Majority of the cars were from the 60s, and a couple from the 50s and 80s. Sadly, all the owners are quite old. That said, this crowd is known for that. On the flip side, the Friday night 'Cruise Nights' are usually a mixed bag of younger/old along with the vehicles. Two distinct crowds. Everyone is very nice. One thing that I did observe among most of the cars regardless of make/brand, that they all had the same modifications under the hood: Edelbrock intake, Holley/Edelbrock carb, headers, HEI type of ign, chrome valve covers, etc. It reminds me of the 1980s at the street races. Pretty boring to say the least.
Just another T/A fanatic. A new project in the works.

camaronut

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2022, 04:37:01 PM »
Like everything - its all coming sooner or later. 

I remember years ago (1993 maybe), a friend was selling his beautifully restored 1935 Chevy Master Coupe - this thing should have been in a museum, it won almost every award you could get.  He was selling it to help fund his daughters education...
He told me he was only getting offers way below its valued estimates from Hagerty, etc......I really felt bad for the guy....
But - the crowd for those kind of cars were "getting older" and thinner....no one came even close to what it was worth. 
He sold it cheap - someone got one helluva deal.

I'm afraid that scenario will follow suit for us too - sooner or later.

BULLITT65

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2022, 05:13:01 PM »
I doubt the scenario will be the same. If there is enough desire for the first gen camaro for dynacorn to build bodies of them, and how having a 5 seat muscle car can still be a practical fun driver. I would worry more about some of the corvette models. The owners of those are getting long in the tooth, and I think some of those C3 and C4 models could have trouble in collectability over the longer run
1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
-Looking for 3192477 (front) spiral shocks 3192851 (rear)
-Looking for an original LOF soft ray windshield
-Looking for original Delco side post negative battery cable part # 6297651AV

crossboss

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #22 on: June 14, 2022, 07:17:21 PM »
I doubt the scenario will be the same. If there is enough desire for the first gen camaro for dynacorn to build bodies of them, and how having a 5 seat muscle car can still be a practical fun driver. I would worry more about some of the corvette models. The owners of those are getting long in the tooth, and I think some of those C3 and C4 models could have trouble in collectability over the longer run



I also agree. 1980s-2000s 'Vettes are selling for great prices. Most are owned by older folks, so unlikely they are abused.
Just another T/A fanatic. A new project in the works.

camaroboy68ss

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2022, 10:14:41 PM »
I doubt the scenario will be the same. If there is enough desire for the first gen camaro for dynacorn to build bodies of them, and how having a 5 seat muscle car can still be a practical fun driver. I would worry more about some of the corvette models. The owners of those are getting long in the tooth, and I think some of those C3 and C4 models could have trouble in collectability over the longer run

Yeah those Vettes are finally on the upswing in value at least to me locally. 74-82 Vettes are jumping in value, you used to not be able to give a rubber bumper vette away. I was looking at 74/75 roadster and they are now bringing 30-45k depending on motor and trans. C4s used to be big for donor cars for street rods in the 90s and now clean base models are past the 15k mark when you used to get them under 10k not to long ago. Stuff like the ZR1s and Grand Sports are booming, even C5 Corvettes are starting to rise again. Same could be said with 3rd and 4th gen Camaro and Firebirds, their values have skyrocketed over the last year or two.
Young gun with a Camaro or 2.
1968 Camaro RS L30/M20, 2017 Camaro SS
1968 Chevy C10 - Twin to the Camaro
1933 Ford Pickup - "Camaro in disguise"

BULLITT65

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Re: This hobby is dying
« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2022, 10:49:54 PM »
I was teaching my son to drive a 3 on the the tree this weekend, and passing on the info that while a popular set up back in the day, you hardly see them now. Fun times
1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
-Looking for 3192477 (front) spiral shocks 3192851 (rear)
-Looking for an original LOF soft ray windshield
-Looking for original Delco side post negative battery cable part # 6297651AV

 

anything