Author Topic: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank  (Read 2658 times)

Camarocards

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Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« on: February 23, 2014, 01:16:53 AM »
Has anyone ever had their fuel tank galvanized 50% Tin/50% Zinc)? I have an extremely clean original date coded tank that I'd like to bring back to a factory looking appearance and do not want to paint it. I realize the original tanks were Tern (20% Tin/80% Lead) coated and this formulation has long since been stopped due to the hazards of lead.

Thanks,

Bob
Bob
'68 SS L35 01D

ZLP955

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2014, 01:38:25 AM »
Bob, I have been involved with hot-dip galvanizing of structural steel sections, but never thin-section base metal such as a fuel tank. Nor can I recall the % make-up of material used. Therefore, can't comment with any direct knowledge, but my thoughts are:
- the process may distort the shape of the tank.
- the existing holes in the tank (such as filler neck and sender hole) while large diameter, may not be best positioned to allow fast draining of the zinc on removal from the tank.
- the finish may not be suitable to you from a visual point of view, being an industrial coating as opposed to an architectural finish.
Having said that, I believe the reproduction tanks (such as those made by Spectra) have a gal finish, but not sure of the process used; it may be that they are produced from a cold-galvanized material.....
Perhaps best to contact a local company that does this process and discuss?
Tim - 04A VN '69 z/28 69-69 715 ex-E/MP

Camarocards

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2014, 02:35:10 AM »
Thanks for your comments Tim. I have sent an e-mail to a local company that specializes in galvanizing (http://www.kornsgalvanizing.com/). I'll let you know what they say.

BULLITT65

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2014, 03:28:06 AM »
Where is the big red Gorilla on this one ????  COOK where are ya buddy, aren't you the plating guru around these parts?? ;D
1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
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Sauron327

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2014, 11:48:07 AM »
Spectra tanks are Ni Terne coated.

I believe the reproduction tanks (such as those made by Spectra) have a gal finish, but not sure of the process used;

ZLP955

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2014, 07:13:34 PM »
Spectra tanks are Ni Terne coated.
What's the process for that Scott? I take it that it involves at least a Nickel coating.

cook_dw

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2014, 02:04:14 PM »
Spectra tanks are Ni Terne coated.
What's the process for that Scott? I take it that it involves at least a Nickel coating.

Stolen from Team Camaro: - http://www.camaros.net/forums/showthread.php?t=207355

The annealed cold-rolled steel sheet is first processed to apply a thin flash coating of electrodeposited nickel, and then it's given a hot-dip lead-tin alloy coating. The nickel base coat gives Ni-Terne steel an extra measure of corrosion resistance compared to U.S. Steel's regular "Terne" steel sheet and also compared to traditional galvanizing, which isn't readily available anymore. It should also be pointed out that the Ni-Terne coating protects both interior and exterior surfaces of the fuel tank from surface corrosion.




You have 2 different types of "galvanizing".  Just by doing a little google searching I found a couple of videos to give a better understanding of the processes.


Cold - which can be done electrically or in other cases as paint which is enriched with zinc to give it that added protection.

 Cold Dip Galvanization


Pros - cost, and application
Cons - looks like paint (paint version - I am still working on trying to perfect this process along with the electro process)


Hot - which is where the zinc (or lead/tin as mentioned previously) is heated until molten and then the part or steel is submerged slowly and stays there for several minutes and slowly raised out and a layer of zinc is bonded to the metal.

 Hot Dip Galvanization


Pros - it will look factory
Cons - cost


I am currently experimenting with the two cold processes mentioned above and trying to locate a company locally for pricing on "Hot Dipping".



Where is the big red Gorilla on this one ????  COOK where are ya buddy, aren't you the plating guru around these parts?? ;D

I am certainly NO expert.  I enjoy learning processes and how to accomplish them myself and for others if the opportunity arises.  My apologies for not seeing this sooner.  I was working on my car all weekend getting the headliner installed along with the diff ready to go back under the car and removing the tank for this same process as mentioned by the OP.   ;D

If I have missed something on the processes or explaination please correct me so everyone can be educated.  Thanks, Darrell
Darrell Cook

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Camarocards

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2014, 05:44:33 PM »
Just a quick follow-up from my original post.

I just heard back from the company mentioned in reply 2. They told me that they will not re-galvanize anything that they did not original galvanize. Not sure why but it's back to the drawing board.  :(

Bob


ko-lek-tor

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2014, 05:59:42 PM »
Bob,
Probably not the answer you are looking for. I took my gas tank to a radiator shop to get the neck re-soldered a few months back. At that time, I asked about having tank re-dipped, re-tinned ?(terminology). This shop is well know in doing rare and difficult antique radiator restoration work and the owner advertises in Hemmings and Old Cars publications. The owner said he could re-tin small areas to repair tank, but he could not do entire tank. So, if there are just some areas that tin has deteriorated, consider just having those areas done and leave the original as is. You can bring back the sheen with some fine steel wool or 600 wet sand paper. Here is a link to the radiator shop I use:  http://www.yellowpages.com/wilmington-oh/mip/powell-radiator-service-5173186  You may call him and he may know a place since he does resto work.
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Camarocards

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2014, 06:12:12 PM »
James,

Yea, you're right.  Not the answer I was hoping for. Thanks for the tip I'll look into it.

My tank is in superb shape and after removing the 45 year old undercoating I was pleasantly surprised to see how well the underlying metal was preserved. The undercoating did exactly what it was suppose to do. The top and sides of the tank where naturally, the undercoating did not get to, has surface rust which, as you have suggested, I'm cleaning up with steel wool. It's just a long laborious painful process. I was hoping for an easier way to get it back to the factory look.

Bob

big iron

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2014, 08:10:01 PM »
I just checked several shops in the Jax. Fl. area and they all said they would not hot dip gal. gas tanks  because of the high temperatures involved in the process. The only way to get the spangled finish we are looking for is with the hot dipped process, so I guess I will soda blast my tank and follow up with 4-0 steel wool and a coat of clear.
If anyone finds a shop that will hot dip tanks I would like to know.
Bob

cook_dw

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2014, 02:35:04 PM »
I have talked to 2 different galvanizing companies in TN and no one will touch a gas tank.  I am working on a painting procedure that might make it look like galvanized.  Once I get all the bugs worked out I will post my results.

BULLITT65

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2014, 05:21:47 PM »
thanks Cook

KurtS

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2014, 08:00:33 PM »
Shops may be avoiding the old tanks cause they have lead in the coating. It would contaminate their process.
Kurt S
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janobyte

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Re: Galvanizing a Fuel Tank
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2014, 09:47:22 PM »
I think eventually cook is going to figure out the process for making gold in his shop-- :D

So if the tanks in good shape under the goop ,strip it ,coat it with Shark skin and leave it ?