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Author Topic: What DoesThe Term Dry Paint Mean To a Professional Painter  (Read 1200 times)
TooManyReels
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« on: September 16, 2012, 07:30:46 PM »

I have been told by some car show judges that the inside of my doors feel like dry paint. I know they aren't as slick as the body paint since its hard to get into these areas to sand and buff when painting the doors and the jams..So what does this really mean. Is that the paint is not slick or what ?  There is no orange peel and it looks clear and shines..

The paint is a PPG product - base coat clear coat..Any thoughts other than waxing and waxing to correct the feeling like Dry Paint Feel, as if I know what that's supposed to feels like...Any recommendation or products that you would chose over another wax or polish..

TMR
Eddie
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Eddie
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« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2012, 07:44:08 PM »

They're probably talking about dry spray. That's when you get over spray on something that wasn't masked/taped off. Best thing if that's the case start with 1000 grit sandpaper and the compound til you get it slick. Then wax. Dry spray feels gritty and has a dull look to it. If it's in the paint under the clear then you have a bigger problem. 
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Daniel  
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IZRSSS
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« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2012, 08:32:41 PM »

Not a professional painter but I'll give it a shot;

I agree with Daniel, probably over-spray. But instead of sand paper I would invest in one or both of these Random Orbital’s (6” & 3”). I’m not one to push anyone’s products but these things do an amazing job, and best of all; their fool proof (unlike those huge buffing grinder-like beasts “professionals” use). One false move and your down a few grand for a repaint! I use the 6” for the large panels and the 3” for tight areas like door jambs and buffing bumpers, etc. And I use them at least twice a year. They come with their own polishes and pads and a wax to finish off the job. Oh ya, and a how to video; www.griotsgarage.com Check them out; and sorry for sounding like a commercial. I feel like I should be getting a commission.

If it’s underneath the clear then I'd take it back to the guy who shot it and have him redo it.

BTW; If this post type is unacceptable please delete. I'm certainly okay with that.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2012, 08:54:09 PM by IZRSSS » Logged
Sauron327
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« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2012, 05:20:39 AM »

You said there's no orange peel, which means it was not shot dry. Also stated was they feel it, so it's not in the basecoat. If it's overspray, try a clay bar first. That's what happens when jambs are not masked off properly. If you have to buff, a 3" mini buffer will cut faster than an orbital polisher. Try buffing before sanding. And if you sand, don't use anything coarser than 1500 unless you enjoy buffing sandscratches in jambs. Usually jambs don't have a lot of paint mil thickness and as a result you can easily sand or buff through. Especially on an edge if you are inexperienced.
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mopar346
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« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2012, 07:43:18 PM »

When I hear dry paint, I think of paint that does not have enough reducer/thinner in it for the conditions in the booth and it literally starts drying in the air before it gets to the metal. It causes it not to flow properly and can create a rough feel. It can alos occur if the gun is held too far away from the object. When it occurs you have a few choices, if you don't catch it soon enough stop let it dry sufficeintly and sand it off, if you catch it in time you can sometimes wipe it off and start over after a remix. It can be tough to buff out without some heavier grit paper coming down to really fine paper. As mentioned, depending on how it was painted their may not be enough material to work with. best bet, live with it or do a LOT of hand rubbing.
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TooManyReels
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« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2012, 09:48:40 PM »

Thanks for the input and feed back...Daniel, here does not seem to be any overspray in the door jams it just needed some elbow power to wax and polish in the tight areas...Its shines very good now.  I will not go as far to saying it shines like the body paint does, but much improved since I wrote this e-mail.

Marty, I do not have the smaller orbital buffer wish I did,  but I do have a variable speed PG orbital polisher and I was able to get into in the bigger surface areas of the door jams with this one.  I hand rubbed the other tough to reach areas the best I could..

Over the past two night, I have applied several coats of polish and rubbed and rubbed..The surface has started to become slick and smooth like the rest of the car. I might try the clay bar after this show.


Anyone going to the Super Chevy Show at Bristol Tenn. this weekend. If so, let me know and I will try and look you up..Way to many shows this coming weekend to chose from, but its time to go to the hills for the weekend...

Thanks for your recommendation...

Eddie
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Eddie
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BillOhio
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« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2012, 07:07:11 PM »

I have used the griots products and the bigger orbital and it does a nice job. On my acura it made it look like it was just painted. Shined up some of our tractors and semis too. alot of work but sure looks nice. No way to burn thru paint with it either
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TooManyReels
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« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2012, 07:36:31 PM »

I asked a Judge this w/e to show and explain to me what the term dry paint meant. His explanation was over spray that had not been sanded and polished/buffed.. The most common place he noted was along the vertical welded body panels which are on the inside of the door frame, the 1/2" piece of metal that point forward into the door opening before you get into the back seat.  The most common spot of over spray is where the plastic trim molding seals the fabric .
TMR
Eddie

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Eddie
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Sauron327
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« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2012, 09:25:08 PM »

I asked a Judge this w/e to show and explain to me what the term dry paint meant. His explanation was over spray that had not been sanded and polished/buffed.. The most common place he noted was along the vertical welded body panels which are on the inside of the door frame, the 1/2" piece of metal that point forward into the door opening before you get into the back seat.  The most common spot of over spray is where the plastic trim molding seals the fabric .
TMR
Eddie



If the paint is shot wet in the jambs, you don't have to buff them. Even if it came out dry, it's easier to reshoot than to buff a jamb. It all depends on the painter's care and skill. Overspray is not the same as paint shot dry.
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