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| | |-+  Again, package tray/rear window mldg. trim paint? Suede? Ever see both?
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Author Topic: Again, package tray/rear window mldg. trim paint? Suede? Ever see both?  (Read 13135 times)
Sauron327
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« Reply #90 on: May 10, 2012, 10:35:44 AM »

It's standard practice for paint companies to provide color matching information. A painter needs to know what to grab off the bank and how to mix it to match a color. That's why there are codes, formulas and footnotes. Nothing out of the ordinary here. It's done every day, all day. I've never seen a TDS put a car company's directive in quotations. Matching paint can often be challenging but the basic procedure is common knowledge to those in the business. Once a car comes in for repair, it's up to the shop to match the paint.
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IZRSSS
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« Reply #91 on: May 10, 2012, 11:44:48 AM »

Scott - I understand/I get it…it still doesn’t change my position based on the evidence I have in front of me. If and when I restore my car the suede finish shown on Charley’s car as well as those on paceme’s cars are exactly what I’ll be shooting for.
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Steve68
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« Reply #92 on: May 10, 2012, 12:26:25 PM »

Marty

Do you think my rear window trim looks suede?

Steve
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IZRSSS
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« Reply #93 on: May 10, 2012, 01:04:02 PM »

Steve – No, I don't think it looks like suede. And, without getting into the long drawn out version. My apologies ahead of time; I think the line guy either screwed up, the previous owner rubbed the original finish out, weather related, or all the above.

Once again, this is my honest opinion as to why this finish was selected by GM; My guess is that this was an example of automakers early attempts at addressing glare related customer complaints. Each component listed above (referring to Bill's post) are areas of concern. If they weren't then all other interior paint finishes including the lower instrument panel would have been given this suede finish or vise versa.”

And, we can go on and on about this but with all due respect; this is my stand and no one is going to change my mind. End of discussion from this guy...on this topic.  Wink
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Sauron327
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« Reply #94 on: May 10, 2012, 03:34:23 PM »

Scott - I understand/I get it…it still doesn’t change my position based on the evidence I have in front of me. If and when I restore my car the suede finish shown on Charley’s car as well as those on paceme’s cars are exactly what I’ll be shooting for.

Change what position? Where is it stated the surfaces are not supposed to be suede? It's right on the paint charts. Do you understand how the tint and additive information informs the painter how to mix the paint? It's simple: A car comes into the shop, and paint is mixed using the formula to match the suede finish, or evidence as you say, of that car. A formula may have to be altered to match that particular car; or spraying technique modified. It doesn't make a difference what paint company either. If you want to shoot for the target in the photos, you can't do it without understanding what tints and additives to grab from the mixing bank. That's what that example of the R-M book illustrates.  No different than any other paint company.

If a person wants to play, go buy some tints, mix the paint and shoot your own test panels. Then you'll have hands on experience with the literature and the products. Shoot the same batch using different techniques and you'll get different results. SEM texture coating provides various levels of finish too depending on how you lay it down. It's cheap. Try a can.
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Steve68
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« Reply #95 on: May 10, 2012, 03:43:34 PM »

Marty

Do you think it's at all possible that the line guy painted the trim as required for a 68?  Since I'm the original owner of this car we can discount any rubbing out of the trim and the car has been garaged for about 95 % of its life.  Even if it had not been garaged I would expect the front dash suede to have weathered too.  It clearly is in excellent condition.  I do think the trim below the window is flatter than the side pieces which are semigloss.  It is sufficiently flatter to keep any glare down in my opinion.  We have seen many deviations from the AIM on these cars so I would not be surprised that there were some deviations with paint as well.

Steve
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IZRSSS
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« Reply #96 on: May 10, 2012, 04:04:35 PM »

Sorry Steve. I over looked the year of your car. I was only referring to 69's.
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IZRSSS
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« Reply #97 on: May 10, 2012, 04:23:11 PM »

Scott - I understand/I get it…it still doesn’t change my position based on the evidence I have in front of me. If and when I restore my car the suede finish shown on Charley’s car as well as those on paceme’s cars are exactly what I’ll be shooting for.

Change what position? Where is it stated the surfaces are not supposed to be suede? It's right on the paint charts. Do you understand how the tint and additive information informs the painter how to mix the paint? It's simple: A car comes into the shop, and paint is mixed using the formula to match the suede finish, or evidence as you say, of that car. A formula may have to be altered to match that particular car; or spraying technique modified. It doesn't make a difference what paint company either. If you want to shoot for the target in the photos, you can't do it without understanding what tints and additives to grab from the mixing bank. That's what that example of the R-M book illustrates.  No different than any other paint company.

If a person wants to play, go buy some tints, mix the paint and shoot your own test panels. Then you'll have hands on experience with the literature and the products. Shoot the same batch using different techniques and you'll get different results. SEM texture coating provides various levels of finish too depending on how you lay it down. It's cheap. Try a can.

For now I'm satisfied just knowing the differences in textures. You'll be the first to know when I decide to turn pro. Grin
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Sauron327
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« Reply #98 on: August 18, 2012, 08:41:19 AM »

This was shot with SEM aerosol texture coating. Also available in quarts, clear or black. Black dries to zero gloss. I shot over it with SEM Trim black and knocked it back a little with flattening agent because satin trim black is too glossy for a dash top. The texture is easily manipulated for the effect preferred. Results varied as seen in the examples posted in this thread. Shadows in photos can vary the appearance from actual surface texture. You can also mix your own, or have it mixed at your jobber as I stated earlier.

This coating should not be applied to any surface where urethane is used for glass installation. Only epoxy over bare metal is used under urethane installations. Some glass shops will do installations over topcoated window channels, but urethane over epoxied bare metal is the preferred method for maximum adhesion and performance.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2012, 09:10:04 AM by Sauron327 » Logged
ZBM 100
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« Reply #99 on: November 28, 2012, 02:01:31 PM »

Who makes the best aerosol spray can suede paint for restoration?
krylon camo black
http://www.dekesrus.com/Krylon/krylon_spray_fusion_flat_black_camo.JPG
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firstgenaddict
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« Reply #100 on: December 02, 2012, 06:55:49 PM »

FIRST PIC:
This is my 1968 GTO under the dash pad, which had never been removed.
This shows it better as the two gloss levels are on the same visual plane.
It is 0 deg gloss ie FLAT and TEXTURED.

SECOND PIC:
1969 Z28 dash top removed Cowl Grille.
Shows the differences well, however in person it is VERY VERY Visible.
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James
Collectin' Camaro's since "Only Rednecks drove them"
 
Check out the Black 69 RS/Z28 45k mile Survivor and the Lemans Blue 69 Z 10D frame off...
https://picasaweb.google.com/112392262205377424364/1969_Z28_Restoration
firstgenaddict
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« Reply #101 on: December 02, 2012, 07:09:34 PM »

Here is a picture of an ORIGINAL Dash Suede in Brown for a 1973 Z28 which I am currently restoring.
The over spray shows that a mist can appear to be both SUEDE and SEMI-GLoss.

 
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James
Collectin' Camaro's since "Only Rednecks drove them"
 
Check out the Black 69 RS/Z28 45k mile Survivor and the Lemans Blue 69 Z 10D frame off...
https://picasaweb.google.com/112392262205377424364/1969_Z28_Restoration
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