CRG Discussion Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 22, 2014, 03:56:44 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Welcome to the CRG Discussion Forum!
Forum registration problems: Make sure you enter your email correctly and you check your spam box first. *Then* email KurtS2@gmail for help.
106456 Posts in 12412 Topics by 4787 Members
Latest Member: Oilron14
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  CRG Discussion Forum
|-+  Camaro Research Group Discussion
| |-+  Restoration
| | |-+  paint color match
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: paint color match  (Read 1369 times)
joesauer
Member
***
Posts: 144


View Profile
« on: March 12, 2012, 01:52:22 PM »

Kurt, some time ago you posted a web site that had cross references/matches of Camaro colors to current PPG colors.  Having trouble locating it now.  Can you help.  Trying to match my 68 exterior Z British Green to something that meets al of todays EPA etc. standards.

Thanks,
Joe
Logged
Mike S
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1149



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2012, 02:23:26 PM »

Hi Joe,

  I know you directed this to Kurt but I thought I'd reply because I am currently in the process of repainting my '67 ragtop using PPG Deltron DBC paints.
PPG still mixes to factory colors. I had no problems getting a butternut yellow color ordered this weekend.
I don't know if you checked prices lately but it is very expensive now.   Cry
Factor in around $1,000 minimum for paint and materials for a base/clear coat application.

Mike
« Last Edit: March 12, 2012, 03:36:15 PM by 67-Z27 » Logged

67 LOS SS/RS L35 Hardtop - Original w/UOIT
67 NOR SS/RS L35 Convertible - Restored
Sauron327
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 861



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2012, 03:10:40 PM »

The codes are at AutoColor Library. http://www.tcpglobal.com/autocolorlibrary/aclchip.aspx?image=1968-chevrolet-pg01.jpg ZZ, code 43795 is only available immedately in PPG as lacquer. In DBC or waterborne the offset is Jasper Green, code 46525 which is less blue and a finer metallic. Or have a prophet done (camera match). Camera matches are on a ratings scale and often have to be tinted. Other option is to have a lab match in DBC or waterborne. (1-2 weeks). They need a sample just as a prophet does. And today's lacquer is not like yesterday's.

ZZ is also available in Glasurit 55 Line or waterborne(BASF). Either way you will have to shoot a test to see if any meet your desires, as the tints of the original paints are not the same today's. All you have to do is call the libraries. PPG, BASF, etc. I do this often and it's not a big deal. I have no idea what TCP Global offers, I buy all my paint locally.

Another option is to find someone who has already hit the target and get the formula. Or have your shop tint it to match. Keep in mind that two original cars parked next to one another may not have been exactly the same color either. There were variances, just as today.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2012, 04:25:57 PM by Sauron327 » Logged
joesauer
Member
***
Posts: 144


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2012, 06:15:22 PM »

Thanks for the information...very helpfull.  Think I'll ask the shop to first do a computer match (gave them my gas cap) & also buy a quart of the PPG 43795& test spray an old hood I have.  Boy, the good paints sure are expensive.  I keep telling my wife it's a hobby, so it's ok to go nuts sometimes.
Logged
Sauron327
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 861



View Profile
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2012, 06:37:44 PM »

I don't know what your intentions are with the car, but I would dissuade you from using lacquer. Today's lacquer does not last like yesterday's. The uncleared original lacquer was also reflowed giving it a uniform gloss and appearance.  If you cut and buff an uncleared lacquer the metallic is distrupted, and can cause blemishes. Urethane BC/CC outperforms today's lacquer, and that of years ago. If you search here you will find judging info for BC/CC urethane.  Check the color match in full sunlight. Do not rely on how it looks in the can. It will change after it's shot. The last paints I bought were $1200-1400 per gallon of basecoat, my cost, and that's not the most expensive. Average is $600 +/-.
Logged
68Zproject
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1625



View Profile Email
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2012, 12:37:12 AM »

What is considered "good" paint.  I've always thought of taking a shot at painting my car myself because the info I've read is the factory jobs weren't show jobs anyway.  I thought I wouldn't have much to lose, but I don't want to wast $1000 of paint either.
Logged

68Z28
joesauer
Member
***
Posts: 144


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2012, 11:45:27 AM »

Sauron327...thanks.    Agree lacquer is not the way to go.  Years ago I would shoot lacquer, spend the next few weekends with polishing compound, and end up with a pretty good paint job.  Think I'll go with the computer match in a base/clear, do a sample, and go from there.  I don't have experience with the water borne stuff (California), so it's time for the body shop.
Logged
Sauron327
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 861



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2012, 07:47:06 PM »

What is considered "good" paint.  I've always thought of taking a shot at painting my car myself because the info I've read is the factory jobs weren't show jobs anyway.  I thought I wouldn't have much to lose, but I don't want to wast $1000 of paint either.

Good or best? Hard to be brief. As it pertains to base, clear or both? Best is Glasurit 55 Line or PPG DBC if choosing solvent and those two particular companies. Then there is Sikkens. I never used their competitors except Dupont years ago. Go down the ladder within a company and you have poor coverage and inferior matches. Cheap bases lay down poorly compared to quality bases. Clear? You get what you pay for. Better holdout, DOI ( distinctiveness of image), durablity and longevity.

Paint results are primarily in the prep. Ever painted before? Are you equipped to do so?  Booths need no explanation. You can shoot in a garage. I've shot in non booths with nothing in the room but the car and produced outstanding results. Dirt primarily comes from the vehicle and your person. Cutting and buffing a few nibs is nothing. Only the individual will know if they may be able to paint or not. Solids are no brainer. But you need to know how to lay down a metallic, even though they are relatively easy to spray. It's your dime and time. Many do it the first time and are fine. Screw it up and you can do it again or haul it off to a shop and let them reshoot it. Go to Refinish Network and read up on it and ask more questions. It's for pros and shop owners and they welcome novices.
Logged
Sauron327
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 861



View Profile
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2012, 07:49:25 PM »

Sauron327...thanks.    Agree lacquer is not the way to go.  Years ago I would shoot lacquer, spend the next few weekends with polishing compound, and end up with a pretty good paint job.  Think I'll go with the computer match in a base/clear, do a sample, and go from there.  I don't have experience with the water borne stuff (California), so it's time for the body shop.

Last year someone I know in CA got DBC somewhere out of state and shot it there. You'd have to check on your CA solvent laws. Shops must conform.
Logged
Mike S
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1149



View Profile
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2012, 07:49:47 PM »

What is considered "good" paint.  I've always thought of taking a shot at painting my car myself because the info I've read is the factory jobs weren't show jobs anyway.  I thought I wouldn't have much to lose, but I don't want to wast $1000 of paint either.
Hi '68Z,

Painting a car is 80% preparation and 20% application. OK…. putting the normally quoted cliché aside.
I found painting to be easy and I was fortunate enough to have an experienced friend show me how back in the 80’s and I picked it up fairly quick. I stopped painting in the late 90's for a while to raise the family, but I'm back now and enjoying it again.
 It's certainly an acquired art form and does take some talent and more importantly an understanding of what is going on when applying the paint so as to make adjustments on the fly if needed. Otherwise it can save you a lot of money if done correctly or cost you a lot of money if not. The talent part only you can answer.
 The cost of paint has gone up considerably most in part due to the price of oil. With primers running at $100/gal+ and paint costing several hundreds a gallon for the quality names, this certainly forces other issues to get the best usage out of it and doing it right.
Some are:
·         Use a HVLP setup to put more paint on the surface and less into the air. The requires to have a good match between the guns requirements and the compressor output and piping to avoid air starvation. The typical transfer efficiency numbers quoted are >65% for HVLP vs. >25% for the conventional high pressure siphon feeds. So here you can see with HVLP the more paint material on the car then the less wasted $$$$ and better air we all breath.
·   A good paint gun ($300 and up) with correctly sized nozzles. Don't use the cheap Chinese clones because they are inferior and the cheap price reflects it. I recommend a separate primer gun and base/clear gun. Others use 3 guns (primer, base, clear) while others use 1 gun. It's ones preference but for yourself 1 gun with different nozzle sets will work. Get acquainted with how your gun works and responds to setting changes and reading the paint being laid down.
·         A finish job is worthless if the air supply is contaminated with dust and oils. The cost of water/air and oil filters, a clean spraying area (easily done in a garage, BTW).
·         A properly matched air supply (includes compressor and properly sized and routed plumbing)
·         How to properly use polyester fillers and sanding techniques.
·       Metal work if body work is necessary. Hammers, files, etc…
·         Cost of primers, reducers, hardeners, paints, sand paper, air tools, welders (if needed), lighting, safety gear
 This is just the basic high points listed and I may have left out a couple. As you can see painting your own car requires a commitment and lots of $$$ up front. But if you are sure of your skills  and are handy then you can save thousands and when done you will have the pride to say you did it yourself. Painting is easy...the prep work is where most of the time is spent.There are a few very good on-line paint related sights. You Tube has many good video demonstrations too.
Oh yea…what is considered quality paint? Everyone will have different answers. I prefer to stick with the name brands and put the better paints on the car. If you plan on selling it a few years then use the cheap paint materials, otherwise for your pride and joy, go for the good stuff.

Mike

Logged

67 LOS SS/RS L35 Hardtop - Original w/UOIT
67 NOR SS/RS L35 Convertible - Restored
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.087 seconds with 17 queries.