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Author Topic: Engine Detailing "Tricks"?  (Read 5624 times)
lakeholme
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« on: December 24, 2011, 09:47:02 AM »

I usually spend a few days in the winter cleaning my engine compartment getting ready for Spring tours and shows. So, what are your special, "secret" tricks for cleaning? A particular cleaner? Brush? Etc?
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Phillip
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« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2011, 11:32:46 AM »

This '07 article of, "Muscle Car Review" is the best I have read to date on the topic (Joe Salvo's '70 Chevelle). Sorry you can't read it but the first and second page will give you an idea of what's in the article. If people are interested I can post several pics of it so you can read it.
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tmodel66
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« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2011, 11:39:48 AM »

Interested !! I am about to have to do this. I dread it too with all that compound dust from buffing.
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Daniel  
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« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2011, 11:57:23 AM »

It would be easier to read if scanned and put in PDF.
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lakeholme
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« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2011, 12:07:13 PM »

Does the article list the suppliers of the cleaners,brushes,etc?
Again, I'm looking for engine detailing hints. What cleaners work well and don't leave residue? Stuff like that.

My best tool for interior (dash) cleaning is a computer brush for the hard to reach places.

Yes, a PDF would be great.
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Phillip
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« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2011, 12:55:59 PM »

Forget it! Took me half a day to down size them now I find out there are restrictions.

Daniel, I'll email it to you.
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lakeholme
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« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2011, 01:13:18 PM »

Email it to me, too.
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Phillip
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« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2011, 04:17:28 PM »

Me to please.
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Steve - 02D Z11 and a Plain Jane hardtop
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« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2011, 04:30:23 PM »

Sorry guys. I tried to post it all but its too much and the focus really sucks. I'll see if I can remember how to post it PDF style. I need you experts to give me a crash course . Oh, and it would be w/o a scanner. New PC and scanner hasn't been updated yet. Undecided
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lakeholme
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« Reply #9 on: December 24, 2011, 05:47:48 PM »

I usually spend a few days in the winter cleaning my engine compartment getting ready for Spring tours and shows. So, what are your special, "secret" tricks for cleaning? A particular cleaner? Brush? Etc?

Thanks Marty, when you get to it, I'd still like to see it.
When I attached my scanner to my new laptop, it downloaded an update and now they work fine together.
If it uses Windows 7 you can save the scan in PDF format, it gives you that option under "Save As".
« Last Edit: December 24, 2011, 06:28:59 PM by lakeholme » Logged

Phillip
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« Reply #10 on: December 25, 2011, 06:34:19 PM »

The entire article...

Inside & Underhood
You know what they say about the “best laid plans.” Readers who were with us last month say Meguiar’s Mike Pennington demonstrate show-car-level detailing tips on Joe Salvo’s national-award-winning ’70 Chevelle SS396. Our original idea was to walk you through a stem-to-stern, inside-and-out detailing job on the Chevelle in one story. But Pennington was so thorough with the Chevy’s exterior that we ran out of time (and magazine pages) to fit it all in at once.
Luckily for us, Pennington cleared his calendar for another day, and Salvo graciously returned his Chevelle to Meguiar’s SoCal headquarters so we could attend to the car’s engine bay, trunk, and interior. This also gave us time to chat more with Salvo about how he preps his car for shows, as well as the opportunity to photograph the car for our cover story.
Though the surfaces can be varied, the overlying concepts behind interior detailing are similar to the processes used for the car’s exterior. Evaluate your surface to determine what it needs, choose the right product based on the surface’s condition, and then use the proper technique to apply the product. The big difference between detailing inside and detailing outside is the variety of surfaces you’ll find when you open the hood, trunk lid, and doors.

Under the Hood
Nowhere is that diversity more apparent than a car’s engine bay. Not only are you dealing with metal surfaces that are painted, plated and anodized—each requiring its own, distinct care—but the detailing technique changes again for rubber (hoses, fuel lines, spark-plug wires, and the like), fabric (hood insulation, paper air filters), maybe even chalk (if yours is a correct-chalk-mark type of restoration).
Where do you start? That depends on the condition of your engine bay. In Salvo’s case, his Chevelle never gets very dirty, even after driving it to a show, so he’s able to chase down dust and road grime with some Quick Detailer sprayed on a microfiber towel. Those of us who don’t own show cars are probably in for a little more work.
Make sure you’re starting with a cool engine. We’re not talking “wow” factor; we’re talking temperature. You don’t want to burn yourself on the radiator, exhaust manifolds, or other hot components. If you’re detailing your car after driving it to a show, open the hood and let it cool off while you wipe down the rest of the car.
Cleaning is always the first step to a proper detail job, and this can be a messy task you’ll want to do prior to bringing your car to a show. Pennington recommends an all-purpose cleaner/degreaser, such as Simple Green or Purple Power, to clean just about everything under the hood. “Just be sure you know your degreaser and the products it’s compatible with. Also make sure you’ve diluted it properly for the surface you’re cleaning,” he added. “Certain areas can stand a stronger concentration of cleaner than other areas. If you don’t dilute the cleaner properly, you can stain or discolor certain surfaces, such as polished mental.”
Pennington did not recommend steam cleaning under the hood. “You’re not really cleaning with the steam cloud, you’re just shooting very hot water on the engine,” he said. Controlling the steam wand, or even a high-pressure washer at the local car wash, can be difficult. Spray the wrong area and you’ve shredded delicate underhood insulation, or damaged the paper air filter. You’ll have better control if you stick with the pressure that comes from a household garden hose.
However, what comes out of that hose can make a huge difference in this job’s difficulty. Salvo added. He always rinses his car with de-ionized water, which has been filtered to remove minerals that create spots when the water evaporates. That way he doesn’t have to worry about water spots in hard-to-reach areas. Granted, the CR Spotless de-ionizer he uses (www.crspotless.com) retails for about $500, not including the resin needed to recharge the filters, but Salvo swears by the system. Pennington also recommends de-ionized water for show vehicles, but adds this tip: Wash with regular water, rinse with the de-ionized stuff and you’ll save yourself a few bucks.
Before spraying any sort of water under the hood, cover any exposed components-the distributor, plug wires, carburetor-that could be damaged or cause electrical problems if they get soaked. Pennington has seen car owners use a number of materials for this, from aluminum foil to plastic bags. He also recommends protecting painted exterior surfaces, such as fenders, with plastic sheets, masking paper, even a wet layer of car-wash solution, as degreaser can mar those surfaces.
Once your engine is clean, make note of any mechanical problems--particularly oil and other fluid leaks—that may be contributing to the engine bay’s condition. Fixing those leaks means you won’t have to continually chase them with the degreaser every time you clean underhood. This is a good time to check your hoses to see if any have aged to the point of needing replacement. Also check your battery for corrosion around the terminals, and neutralize that corrosion (the old baking soda trick) before it damages the battery, the wires, or the battery tray beneath it.
Once the underhood surfaces are clean, it’s time to condition and protect them. Meguiar’s Quik Detailer is a good choice for painted surfaces, said Pennington. Spray the detailer onto a good-quality terrycloth towel to wipe down flat-black and other non-shiny surfaces, like the hood’s underside or fenderwells. (Terrycloth also works for wrinkle-painted surfaces, though Pennington recommends blotting, not wiping, for best results.) For painted underhood areas with more shine—like radiator supports, for example—he recommends stepping up to microfiber towel, as it’s less likely to scratch the glossy paint.
Chrome-plated surfaces—air cleaner lids, valve covers—can be treated with a chrome polish. But Pennington does not recommend using that type of polish on anodized or cadmium-plated surfaces. Cleaning with the properly diluted degreaser should be all that those parts need. Rubber parts—hoses, lines, plug wires—can be treated with vinyl and rubber conditioner, though Pennington advises using a product that delivers a “natural” shine so the hoses don’t get too glossy. Do not put a rubber conditioner on belts, as that could cause the belts to slip.


In the Trunk
Trunk detailing combines many of the procedures used to detail a car’s interior and exterior, since the surfaces in the trunk run the gamut from painted metal to fabric to tire rubber. As with everything else, cleaning is the first step. The inner trunk lid can be treated like any other painted, glossy surface—clean with a suitable was solution and treat with polish and/or wax.
The trunk floor is a little different. After removing everything from the trunk, including the spare and its tools, vacuum the floor, paying particular attention to nooks and crannies that are hard to reach. A god-quality automotive vacuum, with a wide assortment of attachments, can be invaluable here. Salvo recommends the automotive Vac ‘N’ Blo from Metropolitan Vacuum Cleaner (www.metrovacworld.com). It’s compact (about the size and shape of a dachshund, Pennington pointed out), and its powerful, 4hp motor works as a vacuum and blower. Plus it comes with four specialty detailing nozzles designed to reach small spaces.
If the trunk has a mat, pull it out to give you access to the painted trunk floor. Treating the floor depends on the type of paint used. In the case of Salvo’s Chevelle, the speckled floor paint may need just a good vacuuming. If it’s really dirty, use the same all-purpose degreaser you used underhood (diluted properly), and then blot the floor dry.
Once the floor is clean, replace the mat, the tire tools, and then the spare tire. You’ll want to dress the spare as you would the other tires, with a tire conditioner that leaves a natural shine. That same rubber conditioner can be used on the trunk weather stripping. (A tip from Salvo: Whenever he garages the Chevelle, he leaves the trunk lid, doors, and hood open just a crack, so that the weather stripping stays plump and full. Because the car is covered, no dirt gets into the interior areas.)
Interior
Most of Pennington’s interior detailing steps were pretty commonsensical: Remove all your junk befor you start cleaning (and also take out the floor mats, so you can get to the carpet or floor underneath them); clean the vinyl surfaces with a properly diluted all-purpose cleaner on a terrycloth towel; and treat painted surfaces as you would the rest of the car’s painted metal.

Here are some tips you may not have thought of: Going over the carpet (and the floor mats) with a nylon-bristle carpet brush prior to vacuuming will get the carpet’s nap to stand up, making it easier for the vacuum to pick up dirt buried in the nap. Be sure you slide your seats all the way back while brushing and vacuuming to get at pockets of debris that accumulate around the seat posts. In the same vein, fold you seatbacks forward and vacuum the area where the seat back and cushion meet—another placethat traps dirt and dust.

Stubborn stains in the carpet mats (and on seat fabric) can be treated with a new Meguiar’s product called Quik Out. Developed with vacuum manufacturer Bissell, Quik Out is a spray-soak-blot carpet stain remover that’s been designed specifically for automotive uses.

Getting at dirt and dust in small areas, like A/C vents and around dashboard knobs, can be tricky. A set of brushes with soft, natural-fiber bristles can be used on gauge faces and around heater controls. For even smaller crevices, Salvo invested in a cool detailing kit form Slick Stixxx (www.slickstixxx.com). It contains vinyl-wrapped aluminum rods and various sized and shaped plastic rod ends that’ll fit in those hard-to-reach areas.

Once your seats, door panels, and other vinyl surfaces are clean, it’s important to condition them with a vinyl protectant, Pennington said. Not only will the protectant keep the vinyl pliable, it also contains UV screening chemicals to block harmful sun damage.

Maintenance
As Pennington told us last month, the final step in any detailing regimen is regular maintenance. “Frequent car care is easy car care,” is the mantra around Meguiar’s. If you don’t let your car get dirty between shows, a wipe with Quik Detailer on a microfiber cloth may be all you need to clean off the little dust or dirt that will accumulate on metal surfaces over time. For vinyl interior surfaces, Meguiar’s makes a Quik Interior Detailer that will replenish the protective UV screeners on the material. That bottle, and his Quik Detailer, are the ones Joe uses most when he rolls on to the show grounds.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2011, 07:02:00 PM by IZRSSS » Logged
IZRSSS
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« Reply #11 on: December 25, 2011, 06:47:50 PM »

A couple of pics to go with it...
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IZRSSS
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« Reply #12 on: December 25, 2011, 06:48:34 PM »

...
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« Reply #13 on: December 25, 2011, 06:59:14 PM »

Daniel - I have only used water on my car once. However, if I was in your shoes I would use it again. I know how mechanical cutting and polishing can get flung everywhere. Including places you never knew existed. Just have a good compresser standing by to finish drying it off.

Hind sight is 2020 but I alway cover the engine bay with blue painters tape and plastic, shut the hood and fill in any remaining gaps around the hinges, etc. before cutting and polishing. In addition...I also cover wheel wells.
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tmodel66
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« Reply #14 on: December 25, 2011, 07:16:04 PM »

Thanks a ton Marty. I covered most of the gaps with tape but it still got in places you wouldn't believe. What's in the small can for the breather lid? Can't read it.
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Daniel  
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« Reply #15 on: December 25, 2011, 07:37:35 PM »

Its called; "Nano Wheel Polish", and you can find it at Auto Zone. I think I've tried all the "good ones" and I've had the best luck with this stuff. Leaves a great finish and I use it on all my metal finishes/trim. Just keep away from your lids sticker.
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lakeholme
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« Reply #16 on: December 26, 2011, 08:48:22 AM »

Great, Marty, thanks!
Ditto on Nano.
Does anyone rinse with filtered water?. Does it really leave surfaces spot free?
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Phillip
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« Reply #17 on: December 26, 2011, 09:26:54 AM »

Thanks for the heads up on Nano. Do you use it on Rocker Molding also?
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Daniel  
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« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2011, 09:46:33 AM »

Great, Marty, thanks!
Ditto on Nano.
Does anyone rinse with filtered water?. Does it really leave surfaces spot free?

You the man Marty and thank you! X2 on the filtered water as I was looking at different filter options last year and want to complete this year.
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« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2011, 10:36:06 AM »

It works great on aluminum, chrome, and SS. However, you are going to learn to hate your rocker moldings. They scratch if you breath on them too hard. I find myself having to buff them out at least 3 times a year. Oh, and only handle w/microfiber. If it gets to combersome I think I'll start removing them after each show.  Undecided

Your welcome Chick!

Just one last thought. I'm sure you know this already but just in case...

I don't think the article included what Salvo does to detail underneath the engine, or the car. The first time I did this took about 2wks and several cases of paper towels and two gallons of degreaser. I decided real quickly after that, this car would not be driven under adverse weather conditions period. Now I do it once or twice a year, and it only takes about 5hrs to do the entire underside.

After completing the engine top-side (never clean the bottom first or you’ll be spinning your wheels) I jack-up and remove one front tire at a time. This gives me access to everything from the front suspension assembly to everything underneath/midway from the front of the car to the front of the drive shaft. Then it’s just a matter of switching sides and repeating the same process. Once this is completed I move to the quarters. Compared to the front half, this is a breeze and goes by pretty quick. By then, my back and knees are on their last leg.

BTW…one of the handiest tools I have is the tooth brush w/wire handle. Just take spare t-brush and a stiff wire (cloth hanger…my wife started buying plastic hangers so she wouldn’t run out). Heat the wire and guide it into the handle. If it becomes loose, simply epoxy it in place.
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lakeholme
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« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2011, 02:14:54 PM »

Marty, how about that.  I use a test tube brush with a flexible handle to do the same thing.  Again, thanks for the info.  It's obvious that you worked hard on thi sduring the holidays!
I'm going to study the Slick Stixx brushes mentioned in the article.  If amyone has them, how about sharing your thoughts,

So, Chick, what's your conclusion about filtered water?  I used to have a black on black little English sportscar and it showed spots no matter what I did. (Of course, that's what you get with a black car.)
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Phillip
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« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2011, 02:40:33 PM »

Marty, how about that.  I use a test tube brush with a flexible handle to do the same thing.  Again, thanks for the info.  It's obvious that you worked hard on thi sduring the holidays!

Cool. I think I like you’re idea better.

You weren't supposed to notice that. I just hate leaving things in limbo, and It's what happens when you work harder instead of smarter. Come to find out I do know how to transfer the info into PDF format. The problem I have is freeing it up to use on sites like this. PDF's are very finicky about stuff like that.
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« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2011, 06:57:57 PM »

Great infomation in this thread thanks for posting and I will save it for future reference.
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lakeholme
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« Reply #23 on: December 27, 2011, 07:13:23 PM »

How about others? What cleaning agents, tools, etc. do you use for engine detailing? Do you get good results? Any special tips?
  Huh  Grin  Huh
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Phillip
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« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2011, 10:46:44 AM »

A tip I use to detail items on my 69 Camaro Z28 such as bolts and hardware, brackets, and and any item that is plated such as the hood hinges, hood catch, etc., is to wipe them with a light smear of bearing grease then wipe them with a shop towel or paper towel.  I keep the same wipe down shop rag, 1" paint brush, and a tooth brush in a zip-lock bag.  During my spring oil change (typically in March in prep for the spring and summer show season), I also detail under the hood, chassis, and floor boards (bottom side of the car) with products like Fantastik and Mequiar's Quick Mist & Wipe Detailer. 

I got this tip from some guys who restore and maintain Ford Model A’s which had many unpainted parts.  The grease applies a light barrier to rust, and keeps the item looking almost new. 

For an example, the rear leaf springs were originally heat treated bare steel, the drive shafts tubes were plain steel, and the steering box was plain cast iron. I use compress air to blow any debris off the leaf springs and steering gear box then use my “grease detail kit” to brush and wipe the springs, steering gear box, drive shaft, etc.  I finished my Camaro restoration in 2000 and the springs, steering gear box, and drive shaft still look very good.

By the way, I do DRIVE my car to local shows (it the weather is dry) but trailer it to out of town shows.

Have a Happy New Year...and happy detailing!
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lakeholme
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« Reply #25 on: December 29, 2011, 03:36:11 PM »

Thanks! Great tip! Those pictures do look factory fresh.
Does a cleanser like Fantastik leave any residue spots or do you wipe it twice?
« Last Edit: December 29, 2011, 04:12:03 PM by lakeholme » Logged

Phillip
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« Reply #26 on: December 29, 2011, 04:30:56 PM »

How about engine bay dressings like Sonus or Griots? Anyone use those?
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« Reply #27 on: December 30, 2011, 10:02:09 PM »

For terrific step by step instructions as well as product recommendations and tools, check out autogeek.net and click on auto detailing how to.  Mike Phillips is the guy who put this together and even wrote a how to book that I highly recommend.  His instructions are super easy to follow and best of all, his advice is easy to follow and directed for the amateur as well as the pros.  He even has details on procedures that can almost guarantee you won't hurt the paint if you mess up. 

Check it out, I promise you won't be disappointed.

For the engine:
http://www.autogeek.net/engine-guide.html

For the whole car:
http://www.autogeek.net/detailingtips.html


Steve
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« Reply #28 on: December 31, 2011, 08:59:46 AM »

lakeholme,

I use Fantastic on the floor board bottom side painted surfaces to remove any stubborn dirt and any grease splatter from the universal joints, etc.  I then wipe the surface with a dry towel or t-shirt and it has not harmed the painted finish.  Test a spot first to make sure it does not harm or burnish your painted surface.  I don't use the Fantastic on the items that I have previously applied a grease film to.  This is where I would use a detailing brush, tooth brush, and compressed air to remove any debris.  Rubbing the part with the grease rag tend to also clean it.

For under the hood, I use compressed air to blow away dust and dirt, followed by Meguiar's Mist & Wipe Detailer if needed, and then wipe with an old soft baby dipper or a mirco fiber towel.  On rubber and plastic parts, I like to use Meguiar's Supreme Shine Hi-Gloss Protectant.  I spray the protectant on an old athletic sock then rub the area followed by wiping the item or surface with a t-shirt so the item does not look too shiny.  I use the protectant on the interior vinyl which does not leave a greasy film.

If you are concerned about using these tips on your Camaro, practice these tips to detail your wife’s car first.  With all those that-a-boy points, you’ll get to spend an entire weekend under the hood and chassis of your Camaro!

sdkar,

Thanks for the links on detailing.
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« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2011, 10:04:35 AM »

Has anybody used Meguire's  Back to Black  on rubber and plastic? I've heard good stuff about it under hood, tires, door gaskets and such. Supposedly no residue and not too shiny.
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« Reply #30 on: December 31, 2011, 03:53:22 PM »

Sdkar, thanks for the information.

Dave, thanks for the clarification... When I need points with the wife, it usually involves a new car, not just a wash.   Wink

Daniel, I have used Back to Black. A little goes a long way. Yes, no residue.

I'm still looking for opinions on spray on engine dressing.  Huh Grin Huh
« Last Edit: December 31, 2011, 05:28:40 PM by lakeholme » Logged

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« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2012, 04:56:16 PM »

How about engine bay dressings like Sonus or Griots? Anyone use those?
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« Reply #32 on: February 14, 2012, 08:56:24 PM »

Most of the brushes mentioned in this thread are hard bristle. I've started using a soft bristle wheel brush, which does not scratch surfaces or undo connections.

I'm still looking for opinions for best engine dressing...
Any help or input is appreciated.
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AACA Southeastern Division Spring Meet Chair
"Charlotte AutoFair -- presented by the Hornets Nest Region, AACA -- is the largest and greatest Collector Vehicle Event in the Southeast." --September 18-21, 2014
mickeystoys69RSSS
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« Reply #33 on: March 11, 2012, 12:32:16 PM »

Here is what I use on my cars:


Front Compartment/Engine Bay
Meguairs All Purpose Cleaner
Various Brushes
Zaino All In One On All Painted Surfaces
Meguiars HyperDressing On All Hoses and Plastic Surfaces

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lakeholme
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« Reply #34 on: March 29, 2012, 02:52:01 PM »

Beautiful day in NC, so I started my pre-Autofair clean up. I used Gunk Brite to clean the motor. Turtle Wax Wash, diluted, with a couple of different soft bristle brushes to clean everything but the electrical. That got wiped with a damp clean towel. So far so good.
Tonight, I'll work on the engine well shine -my original reason I started this thread. I'm using 303. It has always worked well on our boats and never gunked up or drawn dust.

Thanks to everyone for their input.

I'm planning on that getting me through till the Fall, including three shows, two tours, and as many cruise-ins as I can get to. If you don't drive it in the rain, they usually don't get that dirty.
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Phillip
HNR-AACA, Senior Master
Planning 2016 Sentimental Tour, AACA
AACA Southeastern Division Spring Meet Chair
"Charlotte AutoFair -- presented by the Hornets Nest Region, AACA -- is the largest and greatest Collector Vehicle Event in the Southeast." --September 18-21, 2014
tmodel66
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« Reply #35 on: April 21, 2012, 07:05:59 PM »

I found a bottle or a tea glass washer with plastic handle and a foam head, like you use in the kitchen, is very good to clean in the door jambs. Fits into the door hinges and cleans pretty good. It also fits in between the fender and door when the door is open to clean the fold on the fender that you can see from inside thru the door jamb.
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Daniel  
'69 SS 350/4 speed  Fathom Green--POP
lakeholme
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« Reply #36 on: April 30, 2012, 07:36:26 PM »

Is anyone familiar with an engine cleaner called Nitro?
On a tour this  weekend, the Tri-Five owners said it worked well.
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Phillip
HNR-AACA, Senior Master
Planning 2016 Sentimental Tour, AACA
AACA Southeastern Division Spring Meet Chair
"Charlotte AutoFair -- presented by the Hornets Nest Region, AACA -- is the largest and greatest Collector Vehicle Event in the Southeast." --September 18-21, 2014
IZRSSS
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« Reply #37 on: May 03, 2012, 06:32:51 AM »

Not sure if this is appropriate for this section but I have a question concerning power buffing/polishing the hood. Do you guys do this with the hood closed or partially open. If you do it with the hood partially open (as I do) what do you use if anything to prevent splatter into the engine bay? I go through the trouble of masking off the engine bay but was hoping for an easier solution.
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tmodel66
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« Reply #38 on: May 03, 2012, 09:31:10 AM »

Marty I use old newspaper. Tear a sheet in half and tape it to the edge of the hood long ways. Push the hood down and let the paper fold out over the fenders,cowl panel and valance panel. It isolates the hood and keeps all the compound on the outside. You'll have to put some on the corners after you close the hood but you can tape it to the other paper that's already there.
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Daniel  
'69 SS 350/4 speed  Fathom Green--POP
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« Reply #39 on: May 03, 2012, 07:54:27 PM »

Dan- My initiation spots were the engine compartment, cowl grills (got stuff inside the grills), the suspension & bottom areas in and around the radiator. It took me days to clean that mess up. Now I watch the buffers rotation and mask off the engine compartment. But I did it all on the inside placing tape around the each of the fenders, cowl & header. I have trouble getting a good seal around the hinges. Then I drop the hood where the bolt just penetrates the catch…then I take the rest of the day off. Wink

Your idea seems very effective and a lot quicker.

Thanks.
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lakeholme
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« Reply #40 on: May 05, 2012, 03:19:02 PM »

Marty,
Other than compound splatter, what's the advantage to leaving the hood slightly open?
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Phillip
HNR-AACA, Senior Master
Planning 2016 Sentimental Tour, AACA
AACA Southeastern Division Spring Meet Chair
"Charlotte AutoFair -- presented by the Hornets Nest Region, AACA -- is the largest and greatest Collector Vehicle Event in the Southeast." --September 18-21, 2014
IZRSSS
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« Reply #41 on: May 05, 2012, 04:17:53 PM »

For me it’s just a matter of preference. I found I had better control of the buffer with the hood partially open. Especially when approaching the edges.
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lakeholme
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« Reply #42 on: May 05, 2012, 06:07:51 PM »

I see, thanks.  Grin
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Phillip
HNR-AACA, Senior Master
Planning 2016 Sentimental Tour, AACA
AACA Southeastern Division Spring Meet Chair
"Charlotte AutoFair -- presented by the Hornets Nest Region, AACA -- is the largest and greatest Collector Vehicle Event in the Southeast." --September 18-21, 2014
lakeholme
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« Reply #43 on: May 10, 2012, 07:46:36 AM »

Is anyone familiar with an engine cleaner called Nitro?
On a tour this  weekend, the Tri-Five owners said it worked well.
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Phillip
HNR-AACA, Senior Master
Planning 2016 Sentimental Tour, AACA
AACA Southeastern Division Spring Meet Chair
"Charlotte AutoFair -- presented by the Hornets Nest Region, AACA -- is the largest and greatest Collector Vehicle Event in the Southeast." --September 18-21, 2014
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