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Author Topic: Ideas to share concerning 1:18 '67-'69 GMP Penske Donohue Camaros.  (Read 56541 times)
Swede70
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« Reply #60 on: July 18, 2011, 11:01:36 AM »

Apologies - poor grammar, poor editing evident across previous post (if any effort noticed at all).  

Try this instead:  ...flares will shrink, becoming more gradual, etc. Rather like cutting hair; i.e. one can't cut it longer.  I mastered the same oversized, bending the resin castings to fit the Zamac shell for immersion within a bowl of heated water, altered the wheel opening contour to suit, and finally filed the outside contour to accurately blend the same into the application. The product of a single evening, although finish work is expected to run over a period of days/weeks. 

Thanks...

Mike K.

Flares for 1:18 explained briefly.

1. Four stacks of sheet plastic are isolated and glued together back-to-back to created what I'll term flare pucks.  They must be large enough to encompass the entire mass of the flare for extending out, but also in with regards to the body tumblehome area.  
2. A tracing is made of the extent of the bubble flare on the bodyshell, with the area to be removed filed off with a rasp (done twice or four times depending on the application).
3. A further tracing is made of the standard wheel arch contour to guide work, and/or photo reference is secured to guide efforts in this regard.
4. The pucks are trimmed and filed to fit into the shell from underneath.
5. The pucks are filed from below to create proper wheelarches with sensitivity to reproduce the wheel arch contour.  
6. Exterior contour is sanded/sculpted/shaped.
7. A resin casting is made possible for the creation of a urethane mold of the half-completed flare.  
 
-

8. Given that I casted my half-complete Autodynamics Challenger flares, I didn't need to start my flares from scratch, utilizing as I've done the bulk of the work the other flares comprised.
9. Bend/trim/fit to Firebird.


Thanks...

Mike K.
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Bruce302
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« Reply #61 on: July 23, 2011, 12:43:37 AM »

That looks great Mike. Neat that the various manufacturers are close in their dimensions.
I am pretty sure that the front bumper/grill surround was fiberglass on the T/G cars.   The cars were looking their best by the time they got to Riverside.

Keep up the good work.

regards,
Bruce.
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Swede70
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« Reply #62 on: July 25, 2011, 06:03:25 PM »

Greetings,


Some visceral diecast hack and slash here. Grille surround and grille proper mated to bumper, though still need to grind away at shell to allow flush fit of entire assembly onto the bodyshell. 1:18 Hwy. 61 '69 Camaro chassis introduced and mated to 1:18 Yat Ming '69 Firebird shell. Much extra material on rockers of Hwy. 61 chassis allow this effort at repurposing to suit my needs here. Lane ten-bolt BOP (if they still had their own diffs.) rear end a finely rendered item, will be introduced here with welded-on extended fluid reservoir and electrically-powered cooler detail.

Though I very much like the interior floorpan detail on the GMP Trans Am Camaro chassis, on either it or the Hwy. 61 chassis I'm still responsible for fabricating double adjustable Koni shocks, the pair that are fitted laterally, racing front sway bar detail, a proper fuel bladder/cell housing, Watts link, differential cooler, etc., hence decided to 'do the Hwy. 61' option. Firewall filed back, feeling morbid about how much effort it will take to cut out the full rad. support and inner fender detail on the 1:18 Lane '68 Firebird to introduce onto the 1:18 Yat Ming '69 Firebird shell. A sharp eye may be able to make out that I've also fitted the interior to the Hwy. 61 chassis by cutting clearance for the driveshaft tunnel. A bit frightening to contemplate in total, but coming along. Thanks...

Mike K.



...very deft, very tight fit of Hwy. 61 '69 Camaro chassis. Note how it bobs out just behind the front wheelarches. Plugs for holes not needed to come. Much to add here.


...firewall filed back. Anticipate adding patched '68 Lane item less brake booster, plus heater core/heater block out plate. Lane items very nicely rendered.


...hood fit far better now, although know that for width, length and contour, nothing at all has been done with it.


...grille/bumper assembly largely complete but for putty and paint. Will scuff surface of chrome with brillo pad, for tough and high-quality Lane plating (with no less than a copper coat beneath it) will not yield to normal approaches towards removal. Expect to test coat rear '68 bumper to see what might be achieved. Grille surround to be painted blue as well! Strange appearance - like some Petty Charger before Petty Charger registered as an icon in anyone's head.


...nose in place, hood now flush, interior trim less driveshaft tunnel work spied.


Thanks for inspecting this post...

Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 11:10:03 PM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #63 on: July 26, 2011, 10:31:20 PM »

Thanks for your post, Mike. Impressive amount of work combining several different brand of kits to get what you want. I, for one, am happy that you are providing details of how/what you are doing in case any others out there might get the urge to do something similar.
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #64 on: July 30, 2011, 12:50:46 PM »

Sorry for scattered focus - some Firebird work then,

(...to help decipher matters, understand that companies identified here as Lane, Yat Ming, GMP and Hwy. 61 each produce first-gen. Firebirds and/or Camaros which have been utilized to modify diecast white metal scale model cars in the fashion of plastic kits from days of yore.  Larger (1:18 versus 1:24 or 1:25 scale), a bit more robust, they can be adapted into period SCCA Trans Am sedans.  Across this thread I'll try to share ideas and techniques, some quite simple, other aspects more advanced.  Thanks...  M.K.)

Entire cowl to nose assembly from Lane '68 Firebird to be incorporated into the Yat Ming '69 Firebird. Cut and isolated same, where using the cowl allows me to positively position the firewall and dashboard without having to scratchbuild structure. I expect to fashion a bulkhead to fit behind the firewall to firmly lock the Lane and Yat Ming pieces together, ensure torsional rigidity thereby, etc.

Front wheelhousing/splash shields to be modified Hwy 61 '69 Camaro items, upper control arms to be '67-'69 GMP Trans Am Camaro items situated to ensure perhaps four degrees of negative camber will be seen up front. Firewall shorn of heater core housing, the same awaits a plug. Thanks...

Mike K.




 
 
M.K.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 11:11:42 PM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #65 on: July 31, 2011, 01:32:58 AM »

Very interesting to see the details of the reconstruction, Mike. Thank you for the update. It's fascinating that so many different kits are being utilized but I understand the necessity to get the best and most appropriate pieces for what you are trying to achieve. Why is the hood now green when it was gray in the previous photos?
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #66 on: July 31, 2011, 12:27:08 PM »

Greetings Jon,

There are/were two '68 Lane Firebirds used to stretch out the front bumper, one painted a period metallic green, the other black.  The green example was sourced from eBay, the other was a paint spoiled example picked up by a friend at a discount.  What was initially stripped via plastic media blasting was restricted to the hood of the black painted example, whereas I was not sure at all if I could succeed in cutting the detail from the shell of the Lane product without power tools or access to a shop where more elaborate tools could be employed for the purpose.  A simple razor saw and file work was used here on the 'spare set' of body and hood castings both, and hence little was risked concerning the rest of the model.  Had I failed to cut the shell accurately, the worst that would come of it is that there would be no web posting describing the attempt!

I've found the key towards achieving what I desire in scale is to have a surplus of spares, affording myself low-risk avenues to explore what might be possible.  If I fail in my efforts, lessons are nevertheless learned, while the integrity of the core work remains.  If I succeed, then said effort can be cleanly integrated into the core work without much ado.  Going 98% of the way on some project to risk the destruction of the same for the completion of 100% of what is contemplated isn't cool at all.  Further, actualized potential is rewarded, whereas speculative potential is a bore. 

It really does become a discipline then, with the orientation being imprinted upon one's outlook if you will.  By way of example, I have a bottle of PCB etchent used by some hobby types to remove high quality chrome/copper plate witnessed on high dollar diecast models.  Being tested as a technique in stages, I'm starting with a diluted solution on the rear bumper of one of the '68 Lane models.  This seems to be working, hence another go is scheduled with a higher strength solution on the second bumper, then finally, an effort will be made on the only thing I care about; i.e. the cobbled up front '68/'69 bumper.  Many past mistakes 'makes it so'!.  Thanks...

Mike K.

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Swede70
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« Reply #67 on: July 31, 2011, 12:48:33 PM »

Just a few further thoughts,

While expensive, indeed, what are identified as the 'best bits' are after a time simply reached for and integrated whenever and wherever they may be sourced.  1:18 diecast seems a dying hobby, fewer new tools are seen, while some things no one expects to merit the effort to substantially redo or afford the scale enthusiast.  Chances of being afforded a high-end 1:25th or 1:18th '68/'69 Jerry Titus Trans Am Firebird? - about zero, hence a relatively guilt-free endeavor. 

Scanning the hobby horizon for like-projects has something to do with it as well, and whereas a few high-quality '69 Sebring 'Birds have been done, and a scattering of slot cars, nothing else has been noticed on anyone's table.  There is quite a charge to be had for presenting others with the sight of some project they've contemplated reproducing in scale, who know topic intimately, but for various reasons never commited to.  Sometimes to have a project where perhaps ten or twelve photos are all I have for research stifles, but then to incorporate all that insight into a three-dimensional representation one might move about can really inspire awe.

What I know for certain is on a capital level I cannot have what I'd desire in 1:1, certainly I couldn't take matters to the level I'd desire there.  When contemplated seriously much of the research and applied passion is the same, and hence I savor what is it I can do and achieve - albeit in scale.  Thanks everyone for the sustained interest and support here...

Mike K.
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Jon Mello
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« Reply #68 on: August 02, 2011, 01:58:29 PM »

Mike, thanks for detailing some of the thought process and method of approach that goes in to doing these scale models. I think it's worthwhile to spell that out for others contemplating modifying their own scale model. I do agree that coming up with something that hasn't already been done or been seen elsewhere would really feel satisfying and also inspire awe in those who know the effort involved to make such a project. I think there are at least several of us here that really appreciate what you are doing, me included.
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Bruce302
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« Reply #69 on: August 04, 2011, 04:59:25 AM »

Fantastic work Mike,  I love seeing the detail that you include and the length you go to.
Truly insirational. I can't wait to see it finished.

Bruce.
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Swede70
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« Reply #70 on: August 08, 2011, 09:09:26 AM »

Again - kind and appreciative thanks for the notice afforded,  

Firebird work then.  Diecast shell plastic media blasted, Lane front bumper assembly fitted flush for very deliberate and very time consuming round file work of shell/front fenders. Front bumper stripped of chrome via the use of PCB etchant purchased from an electronics store. Grille was also plated, further requiring paint stripping and Pontiac letter identification removal before the underlying plate could be removed. Cowl area cut off completely from Yat Ming '69, expect I do to fit entire '68 Lane cowl so as to add better detail found upon it, positively site the Lane firewall and dash, etc. Headlamp 'hash' pattern sanded from each lense, paint awaited for each. Inner surface of each rear flare thinned, finish quality equal to the exterior contour. Exterior contour revealed then not to be all, for each flare must in effect serve the purpose for which it is intended. Half-round deck lid pin cutouts on rear spoiler filed in, albeit not seen here.

Tape atop fenders is used to identify specific spots across the length of the each to determine width of opening versus width of Lane casting to be inserted and blended. A vernier caliper will be used to measure seven points within and across the gap front to rear, while careful file work will be required to ensure that the fit will be as fine as I might make it. The standard Yat Ming chassis is in place complete with screws to torsionally stiffen the assembly as I file matters to the dimensions needed, this done to minimize metal fatigue. Removing stiffening members and then aggressively recontouring and reshaping the extremities of the body invites certain disaster if some rudimentary precautions are not taken. Lane inner fender/rad. support/cowl insert shorne of further material, resting quietly as it does just to the left of the mocked up body. Front valence will likely be scratchbuilt compound curves and all. Thanks for reading this post...




Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 11:12:27 PM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #71 on: August 10, 2011, 02:23:17 PM »

Very nice, Mike! A tremendous amount of work so far (thanks for the details of what you have done) but it is starting to pay off. Are you going to dress up the car as it appeared at Riverside or some other race on the schedule?

Has anything else been happening with any of your other models or has this been the sole focus lately?
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #72 on: August 11, 2011, 02:45:48 PM »

Thanks Jon,

Indeed, likely Laguna Seca or Riverside, with Lew Spenser on board and Jerry Titus looking forward to '70.  I think I'll paint the stripes right onto the model, whereas I have friends who might be persuaded to scan and blow up 1:25 markings to mate to this 1:18 project.  Again, and as always, I greatly appreciate the enthusiasm and informed insight afforded me. The '67 Camaro is receiving light attention, the '68 very little, the '69 - again, very little.

Thinking about it a bit, I believe I was so intrigued by the possibilities of the 1:18 Lane first gen. Firebird tool (much newer than their rather stodgy '67-'68 Camaro tool) that I felt the need to reach for it to ponder application of parts to the trio of Camaros.  Learning how to cast select items affords flexibility concerning discreet replication of select aspects of the overall tool, and hence I 'needed to know'.  What eventually occurred was that the project metastasized into a backdated '68/'69 Firebird project, for too soon I was pondering if that chromed prow would fit on the front of a 1:18 Yat Ming '69 Trans Am...

Below is a brief update of the '67 Penske Camaro, bearing the Miasto '68 Z/28 ducktail spoiler (to be cast with extended lip blended in), the Aussie-sourced 'solid' decklid now with an initial hole drilled through it (to be oblong in shape heading both forward and back), etc.  I expect to fashion a fuel inlet from plastic stock, am pondering the fabrication of a slam shut cap w/hinge, and further expect to cast the GMP fuel cell and pumps to reuse just the pumps for this application.  Seen in the photo is a second 1:18 Hwy. 61 '69 Camaro fuel tank, which will be reshaped to install and mate with the inlet in the rough style of a Shelby GT-350R Mustang.  Rereading Donohue's and Van Valkenburgh's The Unfair Advantage, and hence might devise a means to 'foam in' the tank.  Battery clearly missing, cage incomplete.  Pulleys and alternator from 1:18 Ertl '67 Z/28, 1:18 Lane '68 Firebird radiator (upright of course) to be further fitted.  Sheet plastic overlays will disguise curious rear subframe 'channels'.  Just a test chassis, hence no black paint or coherent detail as contrasted to other photo images afforded.  Much thanks...

Mike K.

« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 11:13:04 PM by Jon Mello » Logged
Swede70
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« Reply #73 on: August 13, 2011, 11:43:08 AM »

Greetings,

Something for the 1969 Penske Camaro then.  I had replaced the standard GMP headlamp inserts some time back with flush fit block out plates painted a fluorescent orange/red, but regretted that the domed appearance of the actual mid to late-season part wasn't captured.  What is seen below (if for my fuzzy photo images the detail might be seen at all) is my first attempt with flat plates, and my subsequent effort to lend dimension to new plates fabricated from thick plastic sheet stock.  

A measurement was taken of the headlamp cover I'd fabbed, a round stencil set was employed to trace a suitably-sized circle (two actually) onto said sheet stock, then each raw cover was mounted onto the end of a length of rod stock.  Not having a lathe, I combined the use of an oversized emery board with dexterous spinning of each plastic rod extension capped with a raw cover in my palm to fashion what was needed.  



...before, with flat covers.


...after, with domed covers.


...sorry, difficult to make out they are.



Thanks...

Mike K.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 11:15:01 PM by Jon Mello » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #74 on: August 15, 2011, 01:18:00 PM »

Thanks for the update. Interesting insight into the thinking concerning the Firebird project. I appreciate seeing some of what you're working on with the '67 too. Looks like a lot of things coming together at one time but it is clear that "the wheels are turning" regarding planning ahead.

As for the '69 car, it's looking good. I wanted to bring to your attention that the removal of the headlights and covering the hole with a flat plate did not begin until the 1970 season. Hence, the stock headlights were still in the '69 cars but covered with sticky-back vinyl or tape.
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