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Author Topic: Ideas to share concerning 1:18 '67-'69 GMP Penske Donohue Camaros.  (Read 81661 times)
Swede70
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« Reply #270 on: September 20, 2014, 09:19:38 AM »

Thanks everyone for the kind notice,

Consistent with protecting the lower extremities of any would be scale racing driver, I felt I had to replace the cast iron bell housing with a proper scale scattershield. Research revealed a Lakewood scattershield was employed, whereas a web search unearthed images that could be consulted to reproduce much of the exterior contour of the same.  In particular, an image was found (and seen below it is) that allowed for careful replication of the outline of the mounting flange to the engine block proper.  Some final shaping is required where the clutch is actuated for this detail still seems a bit heavy, but far from a terrible start.  Fine attachment hardware to come then...

Also seen below is the rather strange homebrewed dry sump system oil pan employed by Team Trans/Action in '71.  A stock pump was employed, but so too an additional pump driven off of the flywheel hidden out of sight.  The stock wet sump was reduced in volume reflecting experiments made in 1970 by Titus/Godsall Racing with 180 degree headers that required certain clearance below for joining the pipes from alternate cylinder banks, whereas indeed upon first inspection the 'short sump' is a bit startling to peruse.  The oil reservoir was hidden within the firewall, whereas I suspect the whole operation of the same would have been kept secret but for the SCCA's decision to allow the use of dry sump systems looking into the 1971 season.  I've hacked down my standard wet sump in the hope of recreating what again is seen in the photo I've included.

Lastly, an interior bulkhead formerly created from sheet plastic has been replaced with an aluminum panel reflecting what material was actually employed in 1:1.  In addition to shrinking the overall dimensions of the home brewed seat the team fabricated for use in this application, I have sufficient confidence in my use of sheet aluminum to rebuild it in metal - so, a coming attraction of a sort.  Harness pick up points are seen on the rear package shelf, hence the odd appearance of hardware so-sited.  Kind thanks for your attention.

Mike K.



...the abbreviated wet sump in 1:1, with a tiny glimpse of the scattershield also spied.


...Lakewood scattershield 1:1 reference employed to reproduce the mounting flange outline in particular.


...rear three-quarter view of the new scattershield.  Note clutch fork opening as well as the starter motor bubble or bump.


...side view depicting abbreviated wet sump.


...bottom view, reflecting plastic plug work, the addition of a tiny harmonic balancer as well as further perspective afforded with regards to the sump modifications.  Note too efforts to clean up the transmission prior to casting the same.  Most parts on view here will also be employed upon my forthcoming Jerry Titus 1970 Trans-Am Firebird.


...the replacement rear bulkhead is seen.  Across the length of the passenger's side floor is witnessed what is intended to be a fiberglass rust repair overlay, with the two diagonally set holes intended as access points for the hardware that holds the exhaust dumps in place situated just below.  The overlay is soon to be covered with Tamiya hobby tape with the intent of lending the panel a bit of needed texture.  Lastly, the rectangular cut reflects what was likely a thermos mount, although evidence of what might have been placed here is effectively nonexistent.

Thanks...

M.K.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2014, 10:00:08 AM by Swede70 » Logged
Jon Mello
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« Reply #271 on: September 21, 2014, 09:31:13 PM »

Mike, that oil pan is very odd looking but certainly makes sense if used previously with 180 degree headers. Thanks for including the pic of the pan on the actual car and your recreation looks perfect. You are really paying attention to the smallest of details and that will pay dividends with the end result. Nicely done!
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #272 on: September 27, 2014, 11:38:49 AM »

Greetings and thanks for the lasting kind notice,

I had failed to note over the course of weeks that interference encountered for fit between the front half of the roll cage was in fact attributable to interference between the transmission and a too-shallow transmission hump as meagerly reproduced on the Sun Star interior floor casting.  A brief attempt to mate a 1:18 ERTL '70 1/2 Camaro transmission and drive shaft tunnel to the Sun Star casting for removal of its aforementioned transmission and drive shaft floor hump led nowhere, hence the reluctant decision was made to scratch build the floor pan as viewed from above.  If the original tool yielded such detail as manifest as nuanced and accurate contour I'd not replace it soon, although in point of fact what was provided isn't much more than a flat plate.  Although dejected to forced to employ it and puzzled if you will as to what can be done to add some character to this flat thing, there seemed very little reason to clutch to what wasn't working. 

Other factors influence the decision.  The engine and transmission assembly is set back about an inch from standard on the 1:1 topic, while the transmission overrides the transmission crossmember.  Especially as viewed with the hood open, the whole engine and transmission is nearly level as installed and in modest contrast to the usual dip from front to rear.  Given that this racing vehicle is substantially lowered, the differential is higher too, while less angularity between it and the tailshaft of the transmission is of course welcomed.   Yes - it seems they knew what they were doing!  Small matters of detail that may be noted are slightly repositioned hood art (to be photographed and kept in reserve for guidance as to placement post paint application and polish), as well as a front track reduction and recycled GMP Trans-Am tires sans lettering given any decal application will surely be ruined for handling at this stage and point.  Yes - it goes on...

Mike K.




M.K.
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Jon Mello
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« Reply #273 on: September 29, 2014, 07:53:35 PM »

Mike, with as much engineering and hard work that you're putting into this model, it's a pity you won't be able to race it when you're done!
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #274 on: November 06, 2014, 05:21:54 PM »

Greetings,

A replacement floor fabricated for the Gray Ghost led nowhere given the dimensions and shape were wrong.  Too much pondering, too much speculation regarding where to add mass and disguise the underlying mess followed.  A fresh start here then; i.e. a new interior floor with minimal cutting to accommodate the transmission as well as a newly fabricated roll cage to debut here if you will.  The old cage is seen in the first image, evidencing an incorrect and prim main roll hoop profile (note the tightly controlled bends nearest the beltline) whereas the actual article is more 'soft pretzel' in shape if anything at all.  In point of fact the triangulation for siting the 'X' member within the profile of the main hoop is slightly off on the real Gray Ghost cage with the topmost extent of the 'X' not quite meeting up with the furthest extent of the 90 degree bend on each corner.  Further things to notice is that the A-pillar tubes rushed too far forward, extending around the dashboard when they ought to have dove down to terminate atop the floor just forward of the dash stamping.  I've also angled the main roll hoop back slightly top-to-bottom given I missed this detail first go 'round, whereas the dip in the tubes heading back toward the main hoop, faint at best on cage #1, are here more prominent.  Quite a bit better.  Thanks...

Mike K. 






M.K.
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Jon Mello
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« Reply #275 on: November 08, 2014, 11:44:47 AM »

Definitely an improvement. Nice job, Mike.
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #276 on: November 08, 2014, 01:36:21 PM »

Thanks for the continued interest...,

A search of the local public libraries turned up a 1964 MOTOR repair manual with Pontiac Tempest content.  Mated to relevant reference, seen below is the rear axle assembly taking shape combining GMP Trans Am Camaro brake discs/driveshaft and U-joints, a '68 Lane Firebird B.O.P. differential and other scratch built aspects consistent with coming up with something acceptable.  Negative camber is designed into the unit, whereas the missing half of each of the axle tubes has been added here.  A length of brass rod passes through the diff. into each respective axle tube consistent with creating something strong enough to maintain structural integrity for handling.  Thanks...

Mike K.



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Swede70
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« Reply #277 on: January 05, 2015, 02:28:28 PM »

Greetings and well wishing in the New Year (as this was written),

A detour was taken for the embrace of another project, this slightly off-topic but not horribly so.  Too much time and effort really and not soon to be repeated, someone on another message board inquired as to the availability of a 1970-1973 Pontiac Firebird Formula hood given only Trans Am hoods and body shells had ever been released in 1:18th.  Another visitor responded and seemed bullish about the prospects, although it was I who took up the challenge to yield what is seen below.  What isn't strictly discerned is how it was all done; i.e. the spoilers situated before the wheel arches were bent in and blended, the rear spoiler was ground off, the hood was plugged with the surface contour being reconstructed complete with character line, etc.  And oh - the scoops were hand fashioned from poured chunks 'o resin after first constructing dams atop the surface of an old ERTL 1:18th Trans Am hood!  Yes, all this took time...



...all work hidden in plain sight if you will.  Note how the Endura bumper 'beak' shrinks a bit lower down as specific to a '70-'72 Firebird.  Again, there is much that isn't strictly detected as-designed.  



...looking quite comfortable and grounded at this point.   The Polycast wheels here done in resin are specific to '71 Firebirds and later, the tires were afforded only after '73, whereas I'm displaying a '70 interior - oh well.  So this example is a bit confused for it's parentage!  



...witnessed here is the Firebird Formula (but of course), whereas the refined form of the flares taking shape on the 1970 Laguna Seca Jerry Titus entry (much smaller on the front, and clearly better-blended elements sited on the rear) can too be seen.  No putty has been used to help transition the rear flares to the shell proper, although at this point I suspect what fine tuning for profile required may be achievable thus.  The front flares hadn't formally followed the bodyline contour of the body below the beltline extending up with any great accuracy, hence they definitely needed to be trimmed.  T/G had troubles all weekend long back in early 1970 for wheel/tire interference with the same, hence these additions were slated to grow and alter for dimension across the season proper.

Some plugging filling of the cast resin parts was achieved for use of what are termed Microballoons.  Given I'm helpless to sensitively condense and/or explain what these are without assistance, I here plug in the Wikipedia definition of what they term 'Glass Microspheres'.  Combining these with CA glue build mass very quickly and is now regarded by this writer/fabricator as a vital tool to have within one's kit per se.  One selectively applies some CA glue, dusts the resultant blob with Microballoons (these having almost no weight to speak of), and then repeats as necessary resulting in rock hard mass shapeable to suit...  

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Consider perusing:  

Glass microspheres are microscopic spheres of glass manufactured for a wide variety of uses in research, medicine, consumer goods and various industries. Glass microspheres are usually between 1 to 1000 micrometers in diameter, although the sizes can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. Hollow glass microspheres, sometimes termed microballoons, or glass bubbles have diameters ranging from 10 to 300 micrometers.

Hollow spheres are used as a lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete.[1] Microballoons give syntactic foam its light weight, low thermal conductivity, and a resistance to compressive stress that far exceeds that of other foams.[2] These properties are exploited in the hulls of submersibles and deep-sea oil drilling equipment, where other types of foam would implode. Hollow spheres of other materials create syntactic foams with different properties, for example ceramic balloons can make a light syntactic aluminum foam.

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Thanks...


Mike K.  
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Jon Mello
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« Reply #278 on: January 08, 2015, 12:20:42 AM »

Thanks for the recent update, Mike. I can't believe two Pontiac projects weren't enough for you!  You're a masochist!  Cheesy
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Jon Mello
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Swede70
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« Reply #279 on: February 28, 2015, 10:40:45 AM »

Greetings,

Some delay since my last update, although for the acquisition of a new camera, perhaps that which I post will prove more discernible and visible too!  Captions follow the posting of select photo images, hence move down in anticipation of looking up.




...a four-piece transmission tunnel having been built up for long was finally cast in resin following the creation of a urethane mold to achieve this end.  Rather bland looking still, although for backstopping my efforts I should be able to use and reuse this basic shape (i.e. what begins at the firewall and extending back to the discernible gap) across other projects.  This would be the 1:18th Sun Star-based Gray Ghost again...

-



Reviewing my assortment of incomplete projects, I felt for the New Year I might be able to complete this and that project for select work undertaken to afford my pair of 1:18th Greenlight '67 and '68 Mustangs full interiors and chassis.  As is typical, even brief involvement in another topic expands greatly for the time I choose to invest, so what is seen below constitutes efforts directed towards a '68 Watkins Glen Shelby Racing Co. Jerry Titus Tunnel Port 302 Mustang as complex as any other project I've undertaken.  In mid to late-season form, a rather severe corporate blue with white C-stripe livery was employed, and being rather simple overall, such may prove a good starting point for a full refinish less the risk entailed for embrace of something more involved.  Given I've undertaken few full refinishes, this might be a better place to start.  



...a much older image of my '68 notchback Greenlight tool wearing GMP Trans-Am wheels and tires, less a bit of chrome, but otherwise not terribly special.  In anticipation of matters to be explicated, note how cloddish and unattractive is their rendition of a '67-'68 Mustang front valance panel.  



...new GMP Dodge Super Stock ARE Torq Thrust wheels prove an improvement on the old GMP Trans-Am ARE wheels of yore, whereas recycled Autodynamics Challenger flares as well as those cobbled up for the Gray Ghost prove their worth again for most of the mass required is evidently in place early on.  



...the front valance proved too unwieldy to reshape on the model in white metal, hence the choice was made to cut the 'panel' clear off the shell, whereupon a mold was made so that the same shape might be refashioned in cast resin.  What is seen above is a spare shell that has a plugged front valance sitting before it, and a second resin front valance resting before it less any effort to seriously shape it.  The lip positioned below the grille but atop the bolt-on front valance will be refined for shape, while attachment points for the bumper will be added before it is in turn mated with the project proper.  



...evidently much better, although still requiring work.



...a scratch built rear valance panel was further required given the original is absent contour, sports GT exhaust cutouts, and is largely lifeless by way of contrast.



...looking decidedly butch then.

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...the rough beginnings of a 302 Tunnel Port engine and transmission.  An Aviad wet sump pan is seen, whereas the scratch built intake is noticed coming along even if all that's seen is the base, the side flanges and plenum chambers for the carbs. The oil pan is modified Hwy. 61 BOSS 302 issue, whereas note the swiss-cheesed strengthening braces jutting forward on this unique front sump design.  

-



...and lastly, I've harbored ambitions to fit out my '67 and '68 Penske Donohue Trans-Am Camaros with proper dashboards given GMP tooled and released them with '69 designs.  Before long GMP released the Smokey Yunick Camaro with a more or less correct dashboard, although an enormous tachometer was cast-in to the middle of the dashboard positioned right on the edge of the pad.  Not liking this at all, I nevertheless sourced a Yunick Camaro (or perhaps it was a 'Streetfighter' release in GMP parlance?) and carefully removed the tachometer for sanding followed hard on by the fabrication of a fill panel as seen just below the repair/removal effort atop it.  Hope now exists for accurate '67 and '68 interiors then, whereas the gauge pod/instrument cluster seen here is old GMP issue and not final.  Thanks for perusing this sprawler of a message...


Mike K.  


« Last Edit: February 28, 2015, 11:36:27 AM by Swede70 » Logged
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