CRG Discussion Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
July 31, 2014, 06:39:57 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Welcome to the CRG Discussion Forum!
Forum registration problems: Make sure you enter your email correctly and you check your spam box first. *Then* email KurtS2@gmail for help.
102505 Posts in 12092 Topics by 4669 Members
Latest Member: paulmanta
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  CRG Discussion Forum
|-+  Camaro Research Group Discussion
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  clean up and polishing Windshield and rear glass molding
« previous next »
Pages: 1 2 [3]  All Print
Author Topic: clean up and polishing Windshield and rear glass molding  (Read 7609 times)
Sauron327
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 835



View Profile
« Reply #30 on: October 27, 2010, 10:18:18 AM »

The moldings seen polished to a screaming shine are incorrect. Except for one remaining NOS driprail mldg, I've had NOS moldings and they do not look like the pretty polished pieces. I've polished stainless as stated earlier and the evidence of flash chroming is obvious when it's cut through.
Logged
IZRSSS
Guest
« Reply #31 on: October 27, 2010, 10:38:11 AM »

Cutting through? I think you mean a white residue. This has more to do with getting the metal too hot and burning the stainless. Screaming shine? The only way to get a screaming shine is to get it chromed. This is why stainless is polished and buffed.

As I stated earlier, flash chrome is foreign to me and it sounds like a fine overlay and not something you would burn through but easily cut through. I don't doubt anyone about flash chrome I would just like to see something that explains the process. Does it mean the same thing as re-chromed or is it a completely different process and finish?
« Last Edit: October 27, 2010, 11:02:33 AM by IZRSSS » Logged
Sauron327
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 835



View Profile
« Reply #32 on: October 27, 2010, 11:10:34 AM »

That's not what I'm talking about. I've never seen white residue on stainless and I've got a pile of it. White patina is found on the aged anodized aluminum. When one removes the dents as I have and uses various grits of paper prior to buffing a deliniation can sometimes be seen in the finish. It's the flash of which John is speaking. I've never burned the stainless from excessive heat. I'm well aware of buffing techniques from countless cars painted over the years. Common sense. There is a big difference between highly polished stainless and an original piece; that is what I mean by a screaming shine. When you find out all the details and procedures in the flash chroming process kindly post them or a reputable link.
Logged
IZRSSS
Guest
« Reply #33 on: October 27, 2010, 11:25:15 AM »

When you find out all the details and procedures in the flash chroming process kindly post them or a reputable link.
 
When the details are found you should see them right here. I'm not the one that knows that's why I asked. This should clear it up for a lot of us.

I'm wondering if its similar to the anodized finish found in aluminum?

If stainless moldings were chromed at the factory then maybe they should have a brilliant shine. I just can't see chrome coming out any other way. Sorry if it sounds like I'm beating a dead horse but it just doesn't make sense. Some say they don't want a brilliant shine but then say it was chromed at the factory. You can't have it both ways. However, once we have "An explanation of the process", it should answer a lot of these questions. Why don't we give it some time...  Smiley
« Last Edit: October 27, 2010, 12:34:38 PM by IZRSSS » Logged
Sauron327
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 835



View Profile
« Reply #34 on: October 27, 2010, 01:35:56 PM »

It's obvious the process is different because the appearance is different. That was also pointed out by John in reply #14. The anodized finish on aluminum is not the same and can be removed differently. Some use oven cleaner and other chems. I never had a reason to. But those I've sold trim to have and then sent it out to be re-anodized. Add that your research work. I'm not overly concerned with all the details but perhaps others are.
Logged
IZRSSS
Guest
« Reply #35 on: October 27, 2010, 04:22:08 PM »

Not really sure why you hijacked my question but with all due respect I still want to know from someone that was there...
Logged
Sauron327
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 835



View Profile
« Reply #36 on: October 27, 2010, 04:32:34 PM »

Not really sure why you hijacked my question but with all due respect I still want to know from someone that was there...

 This thread was started by someone else on Dec. 9, 2009 and has had input from various members. It's an open forum. If privacy and one on one problem solving are preferred, an off site discussion is best suited to meet that need.
Logged
IZRSSS
Guest
« Reply #37 on: October 27, 2010, 04:51:20 PM »

Not really sure why you hijacked my question but with all due respect I still want to know from someone that was there...

I have nothing further to discuss with you.
Logged
L78 steve
Member
***
Posts: 398



View Profile Email
« Reply #38 on: October 27, 2010, 10:26:34 PM »

All I can add is there is definitely a coating of something over the raw stainless on front and rear window trim.
Logged

69 Z/28 Dover White X33,ZL2,PS,M20,Std.int.04C
IZRSSS
Guest
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2010, 06:22:11 AM »

I assume this is what John is referring to?
 
http://www.finishing.com/283/70.shtml

I digress...had no idea chromium in its natural state is clear.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2010, 07:53:42 AM by IZRSSS » Logged
JohnZ
CRG Member
*****
Posts: 4048


View Profile Email
« Reply #40 on: October 29, 2010, 11:00:11 AM »

I digress...had no idea chromium in its natural state is clear.

Here's the short version:

"Show Chrome" (not seen on factory parts like bumpers) is a 3-step process - copper plate, polish, nickel plate (that provides the "silvery" color), polish, then chrome plate (chrome is clear, provides the "shine", and protects the underlying nickel from oxidation and pitting).

"Factory Chrome" omits the copper-plating stage - nickel is plated directly on the polished raw steel part, then it's chrome-plated.

"Flash-Chrome" is only the final clear chrome plating (about a half a thousandth of an inch thick); used on polished stainless steel trim parts to protect them from oxidation.
Logged

'69 Z/28
Fathom Green
CRG
IZRSSS
Guest
« Reply #41 on: October 29, 2010, 02:45:52 PM »

I feel more confident about discussing this process with would be platters. As I mentioned earlier, this term was totally foreign to me and now it all makes sense.

I'd give just about anything to download that brain of yours.  I like so many others have followed your responses to everything GM. You are a wealth of information and we can always count on you.

Thanks again John!
« Last Edit: October 29, 2010, 03:09:58 PM by IZRSSS » Logged
m22mike
Member
***
Posts: 161



View Profile
« Reply #42 on: November 07, 2010, 09:11:03 AM »

This has been a very interesting thread, and a great chance for some to learn about something they knew knothing about.
There is some good information in Jeff Lilly's book. "How to Restore Metal Auto trim".
 In his book he states that GM SS trim has been flash chromed since 1957 ! I believe it to. They also use a 57 Chevy wheel cover as a test piece, and go into detail on how to remove the flash chrome layer using a muratic acid solution.
  As stated in this thread already, when you break through the flash chrome there appearance of the two finishes is drastic.
I have had limited success with GM SS trim when I remove all the FC. I have found that the base metal is not of very good quality, sometimes even porous, and it flat will not come up to a nice bright luster no matter what you do.
 A few years back I polished some 64-65 Dodge trim that was not flash Chromed. It looked like jewelery when finished. I could tell there was a big difference in the quality of the sheet stock used ?
 On very nice used trim with little or no deep scratches you can get away with some wet sanding, 1000- 2000 grit.
If you ever do this you will notice the chrome is very hard and progress is slow, and for you guys that get it, as you cut into the base metal, it is like sanding filler compared to the FC on top.
 Allot of trim I see has been damaged from handling after it has been removed from a car. I like to bundel it up with tape to keep it from banding together.
 I carry a piece of Camaro trim with me to cruise nights that has half the FC sanded off. Used it several times to prove a point. Grin

Mike
Logged

X66 L78 M22 4.10 Deluxe Threads, PNT 10/10, Red Hockey stripe
sam
Member
***
Posts: 232


View Profile Email
« Reply #43 on: November 09, 2010, 05:53:56 PM »

Mike as always you are the Professor!
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3]  All Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.087 seconds with 17 queries.