Author Topic: Upper alternator bolt  (Read 5881 times)

JohnZ

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Re: Upper alternator bolt
« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2009, 02:43:07 PM »
What does your car have John?


Mine's an RSC, but there's nothing special about the bolt; I'm sure others were used as well.
'69 Z/28
Fathom Green
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Dave69x33

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Re: Upper alternator bolt
« Reply #16 on: September 23, 2009, 06:43:20 PM »
When hardware details are discussed, I like to know the build date of the car.  As discussed this topic, there may have been more than one manufacture/supplier of the hardware used for an application.   If we are after accurate restorations, it’s a good idea to evaluate common vs. different hardware used during a build period along the production model run. The correct finish of the hardware is important also.  JohnZ and Jerry at CHP has been good resource for this detail as well as other on CRG with pictures from survivor cars.

My first experience with "correct" hardware vs. my car's build date was during the 1000 point judging completed on my '69Z during the 2000 Camaro Nationals in Columbus, OH.  I lost a point or two for having the wrong rear spoiler hardware on my 05A car.  While doing my home work to correct the spoiler hardware on my car, I discovered that, at about the time spoilers become mandatory on the ‘69Z, the hardware was change.  My car had been repainted years prior by a previous owner, so some of the “original” hardware lost and replaced.

They may have used the same alternator hardware during the entire '69 model run, and/or shared this hardware across other GM assembly plants. 

I know of two unrestored original '69 Camaros (an X77 Z28 and Pace Car) in the area where I live.  I have been tying to ID details such as hardware and component date codes for fun.  Survivor cars are great to look at and study! 


 

GaryL

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Re: Upper alternator bolt
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2009, 07:00:45 PM »
I am guessing my 02D car and JohnZ's 02D car probably had the same bolt.
Gary

Lemans Blue X33. DZ, M20, manual steering. Only BU code rear end is original.

Pex68

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Re: Upper alternator bolt
« Reply #18 on: September 23, 2009, 07:41:34 PM »
My first experience with "correct" hardware vs. my car's build date was during the 1000 point judging completed on my '69Z during the 2000 Camaro Nationals in Columbus, OH.  I

I believe the only place Camaro Nationals is held is in Carlisle Pa hosted by The American Camaro Association.  I think the show you’re referring to is the PPG Nationals?

I have been tying to ID details such as hardware and component date codes for fun.  Survivor cars are great to look at and study! 

Me too...and I'm sure you’re amazed by some of the stuff you see!!!  All to many times these cars get grouped into the idea that things can only be "one way" and it's just not true.  I understand that the judging process has to have a standard to go by, and CERTAIN things DID in fact only happen one way, but everyone must remember these were MASS PRODUCED CARS built in the 60's by people who were just "doing their job"  Anomalies and every day life happened, just as they do today, and things changed throughout the production year; even if it wasn't always caught on paper.
Chris P
1968 Sequoia Green SS 396/325 M20

Dave69x33

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Re: Upper alternator bolt
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2009, 02:26:41 AM »
The Camaro Nationals back in the late 1990's and early 2000 period, was run under the World Wide Camaro Club organization, which dissolved and got absorbed by Ecklers.   The WWCC would hold national events at different locations each year.  The events I attended were in Pigeon Forge, TN, Stone Mountain, GA, and Columbus, OH. 

During that time, the WWCC had a 1000 point judge system and would award bronze, silver or gold award depending on points scored.  If you received a gold award, you could then have your car judged for diamond class.  There was a fee for diamond class judging, which took about four hours to complete.  They used a very extensive check list, operating everything on your car, verified date codes, and evaluated the overall quality and accuracy of the restoration.

Many judges had extensive experience restoring Camaros, and some knew certain generation cars better than others.  They had scrap books with year’s worth of facts and photo documentation from many cars, survivors, and clean original cars.  The photo albums they had were as interesting to look at as the cars they were judging.  When an item, hardware, etc. was in question, they would consult each other and compare notes and "photo facts" to make a decision on the item.   This is how I learned that judges had to look thru their reference material for "common" used hardware, etc. during the time frame that car was built.

You very correct in that there was not a single "standard" for everything on our cars.  The assembly manual was a standard work instruction and guide, but as we have seen, many variations are possible.

Over the years, I have met owners of very nice survivor Camaros that "get the itch" to restore their cars to look top notch like many we see at shows.  I always praise the owner for what they have, and how rare a clean original Camaros are today, and encourage them to keep what they have as is.  Our cars are only original once.

Good luck on your projects!

   

Pex68

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Re: Upper alternator bolt
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2009, 03:14:15 PM »
The Camaro Nationals back in the late 1990's and early 2000 period, was run under the World Wide Camaro Club organization, which dissolved and got absorbed by Ecklers.   The WWCC would hold national events at different locations each year.  The events I attended were in Pigeon Forge, TN, Stone Mountain, GA, and Columbus, OH.    

Didn't know that.  Had Camaros all my life but didn't start participating in judged events until around 02 and being that the ACA had it’s 11th show this year I thought they were the only ones who had “Camaro Nationals”

Over the years, I have met owners of very nice survivor Camaros that "get the itch" to restore their cars to look top notch like many we see at shows.  I always praise the owner for what they have, and how rare a clean original Camaros are today, and encourage them to keep what they have as is.  Our cars are only original once.

I agree and do the same now since it seems once you touch something it opens up that "that's not how it was" door  :D
Chris P
1968 Sequoia Green SS 396/325 M20