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Author Topic: "Survivor" definition  (Read 4852 times)
jdv69z
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« on: August 22, 2008, 10:04:45 AM »

The term "survivor" is sometimes used to describe the condition of a Camaro. What do others take that to mean? Original everything including paint, or mostly original, maybe a repaint. Or?

Jimmy V.
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Jimmy V.
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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2008, 10:42:48 AM »

A car that has "survived" time and modifcation to give us an understanding of what it was like when it came from the factory. 
Not just for Camaros but for any classic car, I'd say:
35 years or older (I've seen standards as low as 20 years.);
Must be able to drive onto the showfield;
Be at least 65% unrestored/unaltered (I've seen standards as low as 50%.) in the four  areas of exterior, interior, under hood, and chassis (which in the end is the whole car). 
Properly judged in that manner "as it came from the factory".
An important purpose behind survivor cars is to preserve the car as a source to determine factory orginality.
AACA has a Historic Preservation class for that purpose: to have unrestored cars that preserves the standard.
I saw that Bloomington Gold sponsored a survivor show back in June and love their motto, "Worn... But Not Worn Out".


 
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Phillip
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jdv69z
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2008, 03:03:05 PM »

Of course my reason was for asking was selfish. I was trying to decide if calling my 69 Z a survivor was a fair description. It has been repainted once, approx 1981, but has all original drive train, etc., original interior, and original white vinyl top. It is missing a few items, smog, original wheels,  and original chambered exhaust. All sheet metal is original as well. Trunk is original paint. Even still has original chrome ball on Hurst shifter, although most of the chrome has worn off. I wasn't really looking at it from a show perspective, just as an overall general descriptive term.

Jimmy V.
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Jimmy V.
black69
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2008, 03:59:05 PM »

I strongly recommend if you bring a survivor car to a car show, watch it like a hawk. I had a guy with a $200k plus 69 camaro get some points off in judging at chevy vette fest, and they told him what an original washer bottle lid would be like (some ridge underneath the finger tab) to go look at my  survivor camaro that was the closest car located by his. So I see him underneath the hood of my car, did not even ask me, with the washer bottle plastic lid tab 'bent back' looking for the mystery ridge, and now the tab is bent back and broken. Yes, I lost it when I rushed over to my car to see what he was doing, he told me it must have already been broken and did not even offer to find me another one as an appology (which would have quickly calmed me down). I took my car home with the task of now having to find a survivor washer bottle lid because someone could not respect a survivor car the right way, by asking first. I have no idea how much its going to cost, or where to find one, or where to look.

So beware of the downsides when you go to a survivor show, it may end up costing you more time, money, and aggrevation than admission. Defintely cable lock the hood at shows when you leave the car there overnight.

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JohnZ
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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2008, 10:14:18 PM »

In NCRS Corvette "Star/Bowtie" judging (the class for unrestored cars), ONLY absolute originality is judged, with no consideration whatever for "condition". Mechanical and Chassis must be at least 85% originall, and Interior and Exterior must be at least 80% original; any of those areas that pass are awarded a "Star" for that area, and if all four areas meet their requirements, the car qualifies for the "Bowtie" award. It is not possible to "build" a car for Star/Bowtie judging.

In Bloomington Gold Corvette "Survivor" judging (their class for unrestored cars), at least three of the four areas must be judged at least 50% original (you can fail one area completely and still qualify for the award).
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maroman
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« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2008, 08:54:45 AM »

And the word "survivor" is copywrighted. Don't try to use it in an advertisement for your car, without permission.
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Doug  '67 RS/SS 396 auto I know the car since new
Mark
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« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2008, 07:49:52 AM »

By the TV show?  Don't think you can copyright a word.
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Mark C.
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JohnZ
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« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2008, 10:40:02 AM »

By the TV show?  Don't think you can copyright a word.

Mark - The descriptive term "Survivor" for a car is copyrighted by Bloomington Gold as part of their "Survivor" judging and award program.
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tom
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« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2008, 04:40:16 AM »

I beleive you can copyright a new use for a word.
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Sauron327
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« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2008, 05:59:20 AM »

  We are a little off the auto subject now but a word or icon pertaining to a unique situation or particular subject may be copyrighted.
  For example: Upon investigation the "money bag" symbol with the $ on it was found to have no copyrights attached. A gentleman copyrighted the symbol and now owns it's use exclusively. He may, and has, issued cease and desist orders against its use without his permission. And he can charge for its use. He does not excecise his authority in all situations but he does so against large corporations trying to circumvent guidelines with unethical business practices.
  Example # 2: Apple is just a word but as it pertains to a certain subject it is protected under copyright laws.
          Ex. 2a. L-78
  If one feels his business embodies a word or icon it is wise to search for infringement violations before embracing it as an identity marker.
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67rscoupe
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« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2008, 01:16:14 PM »

how can you copywrite a word? thats crazy.
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