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Author Topic: Color Change?  (Read 2044 times)
skidmark
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« on: August 04, 2008, 10:22:04 PM »

Im restoring a 67 rs #s matching 80k 327 210hp professionaly , for resale, paint code DD nantucket blue, black vinyl top,would I depriciate the value of the car by painting it a color other than the original nantucket blue? If so by how much?? Thanks to all that can help
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Sauron327
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« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2008, 06:28:40 AM »

 The Board can give you a better definative depreciation figure. However, to what degree do you intend on taking the resto? Will all components be correct? Do you have any docs? Will it at least be an origional color to that year? You have to consider marketability. I do all my own work and my opinion does not represent the preferences of all potential buyers. Personally, I would prefer an origional color on a #'s matching or non #'s matching car. Or if you are building it for yourself. I have a #'s matching 67 Jane with POP that I will die with so I built it my way.  Also a Code 00 that won't be painted anything but, even if for resale. If you are being contracted by a client to shoot it a color of their choice,you may decide to do so. If a car were a Z, SS, COPO, L-30 or any other more desireable car color change would negatively affect the value of the car and it's marketability. Not to mention violate conformity ethics. If you can apply ethics to iron.  Scott 
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firstgenaddict
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2008, 10:13:43 AM »

If it is being professionally restored I do not see how you could be in it cheap enough to sell it for a profit...
Even if the car was free...
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James
Collectin' Camaro's since "Only Rednecks drove them"
 
Check out the Black 69 RS/Z28 45k mile Survivor and the Lemans Blue 69 Z 10D frame off...
https://picasaweb.google.com/112392262205377424364/1969_Z28_Restoration
67L48
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andy_hach
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2008, 01:05:51 PM »

If you're reselling for a profit, you're going down the wrong road.  The audience for a nos matching, medium blue, 327/210 car is limited.

Though I personally hate them, you're much better off making an RS/SS clone.  Toss in a 454 or 502 engine with lots of chrome.  Paint it bright red.  Modernize the hell out the interior.  Done and done.  That's where you'll get your money.  It's a car that appeals to the masses, will win trophies at car shows, etc.  It's really that simple.
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K. A. Young
1967 Camaro SS 350
Fort Collins, CO
Sauron327
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« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2008, 02:16:10 PM »

 This could go on forever. I agree with aspects of outlooks stated. Finances and money are relative to the person and NOT that simple.  The cars I have done in the past and made the most $ on are cars that were contracted on an hourly basis, no matter the hinderence. I have told people they can purchase a finished car for thousands less but they(not all) want it done anyway. 1st Gen Addict is right. The hours required to do a car top to bottom and make a  good profit is minimal if working outside these contractual parameters. Rollers are another story. Many  people cannot fabricate or paint but desparately want to build a car. Nor spend the $ to set up shop and acquire such knowledge for one car they want before they die. So they can buy a roller and put it together themselves. If your doing your own car it does not matter because you enjoy it. Even if you sell your own car you got to use it and $ will be returned. It depends how much your time is worth. If one is combining other aspects to the business the loss/leader business practice applies. What are you making on a yearly basis calculating the hours required? One car-one time resto and  quick profit? Rare indeed. I know a local gentleman who is able to locate desireable cars(Janes are out) in various stages of condition at shockingly low prices. And is fortunate enough to have a client/collector pay him hourly for work performed. But that's his profession through and through. I'm a hobbiest now mostly and on occasion will get something cheap, fix it and sell it. It comes easy to me and I can do it fast and right(Is there any other way?) And I'm sure a lot of you out there can as well.    Thank you,  Scott
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skidmark
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« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2008, 05:00:05 PM »

Thanks guys!  But I never stated I was building this car for profit, I am a self employed bodyman of thirty plus years. I am fully aware of the hours and money that go into a resto,I use these for fill in work, (not good at sitting around). Anyway It sounds like the car isnt worth anymore original code DD than black or red, Is that correct?  Just thought it might be more appealing another color to potential buyer, not crazy about nantucket blue w/ black top. Thanks again, Mark
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Sauron327
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« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2008, 05:07:10 PM »

 Well Mark, Thanks for the occupation info. That being said, Lose the blue and well...you know the rest.  Take care, Scott
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