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Author Topic: Breaking in a motor  (Read 13356 times)
bob69
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« on: January 14, 2006, 08:44:47 AM »

I finialy have my motor back together ( 302 30 over ) It's all new execpt the crank & rod's ( I needed to put bushings in the rod's to get the right fit) My question is how do I break it in. Thanks Bob        One other question since I have roller rockers ( true 1.5 ) should I gap at 30.
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JohnZ
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2006, 12:33:27 PM »

Treat it reasonably well for the first couple of hundred miles, with varying speeds and loads, avoiding long stretches of constant high speed like freeway travel. Assuming you changed the oil and filter after first-fire and cam break-in, change it again after 100 miles, then at 500 miles, then at normal change intervals. With true 1.5 rockers, lash it at .030".  Smiley
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bob69
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« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2006, 12:16:11 AM »

How should I break in the cam, the guy at the shop said to run it at about 12,000 rpm's for about 5 min. and what oil weight should I use. thanks Bob
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CNorton
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« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2006, 08:52:43 AM »

There's obviously something wrong with the statement "12,000 rpm for 5 minutes."  Is that a typo?

c
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Brian K
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« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2006, 11:39:00 AM »

Well guess what my Father and Uncle and me did yesterday, just broke-in the solid lifter 427 motor in a complete rotisserie restored 69 Yenko Camaro clone we just finished for a customer. This is the  break-in procedure for all chevy solid lifter cams.

1: set ign. timing on no.1 cyl. readty to fire
2: prime engine oil system  (we use straight 30 weight non detergent oil for engine break-in)
3: make sure valve lash set.
4: re-install distributor set for no 1 ready to fire
5: do not install coil wire.
6: turn engine over with starter making sure engine developes oil pressure on your oil pressure gauge.
7: adj carb idle air bleed screws 1 1/4 turns out
8: adj. carb idle screw to 1/2 t0 1 turn above base idle adj, you are setting engine to run at about 1800 to  2200 rpm after the engine comes off the fast idle cam.
9: you are now ready to start engine (install coil wire).
10: start engine. if above have been done properly all things should go well
11: start engine and run for 15-20 minutes at 1800 to 2200 rpm.( do not rev or change rpm level above or below the 1800 to 2200 rpm. at this point not necessary to adj timing or set carb. these things will be done after cam break-in.
be sure to watch engine oil pressure gauge and water temp. do not let temp go over 200 to 210 degrees and check for leaks (oil and water). After 15 to 20 minute break in period shut off engine (stalling motor is better than key turning if its a manual trans), let engine cool, check and top off radiator. drain oil, change fillter (add new oil and filter whatever your owners manual  recommends) set engine timing, re-adj carb and re-adjust valves to proper valve setting.

any questions just post or email.

we have installed many chevy solid lifter cams.

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bob69
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« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2006, 10:08:01 AM »

yea 1,200
There's obviously something wrong with the statement "12,000 rpm for 5 minutes." Is that a typo?

c
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mikefam
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« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2007, 06:33:45 AM »

Can anyone explain to me the logic behind the cam break-in? What does that initial run time do for the cam? Does it assume that you installed new cam bushings?

Mike.
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68 Convertible w/327 275hp donor engine from a 67 Impala and TH350
Jerry@CHP
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« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2007, 08:00:09 AM »

VERY IMPORTANT!

Make sure that you use the Shell Rotella motor oil (15-40) for break in along with a can of GM's EOS.  If you do not follow these steps you will wipe the cam.  I'm sure many of you have read about the removal of zinc from motor oil.......and how camshafts are wiping all the time because of the removal of zinc.  Have been many articles on this as of late.  Zinc was a big part of most oils but now it is not.  It reduces friction and keeps wear to a minimum.  Zinc is still in the Rotella oil.  Available at Walmart.  EOS, buy it at any GM dealer. 

Engine has to run about 20-25 minutes at 1800-2200 rpm.  Put a house fan in front of the radiator to make sure the engine does not over heat.  If you do not follow these procedures, you will wipe the cam.   

Jerry
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Jerry@CHP
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« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2007, 08:06:30 AM »

Another foot note, get an old distrbutor shaft and make an oil priming tool out of it.  You can install this shaft in the end of a drill motor and stick it in the engine into the oil pump.  Turn the drill on and you will build oil pressure this way.  Watch your gauge as you are doing this.  The oil pressure will come up slowly.

Jerry
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JohnZ
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« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2007, 10:50:09 AM »

Be sure you use a proper oil prime tool that duplicates the two spools at the bottom of the distributor housing (or an old distributor housing like Jerry said), or you won't get any oil to the lifters; the groove between those two spools forms the oil passage to the lifter galleries, and if they aren't there, it'll just pump the oil into the distributor hole and back into the pan (see photo below of a correct prime tool made by Tavia - that's what I use).

The cam lobes and lifter bases are lubricated by "splash" oil from the rods and mains, which is why the cam break-in procedure is important; if you just let it idle at "first-fire", you won't get enough oil to the cam and lifters, and you'll wipe the cam.

Any diesel oil that carries the "CI-4", CI-4+", or "CJ-4" API classification on the "donut" on the back of the bottle is what you want, plus the bottle of EOS; any brand is fine (Shell Rotella, Mobil Delvac, Chevron Delo, etc.) - what matters is the API classifications noted, which ensures an adequate blend of the ZDDP zinc anti-wear additive.

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1968RSZ28
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« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2007, 02:46:59 PM »

Jerry -

Do you recommend adding a can of GM Engine Oil Supplement (EOS) at every oil change or is this over-kill?  The reason for the removal of the anti-wear additives zinc & phosphorus from motor oils is that the auto manufacturers feel they are damaging the catalytic converters over time on the new cars.  Something we first generations guys don't have to worry about.   Grin

Paul  
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1968RSZ28
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« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2007, 03:37:40 PM »

Another foot note, get an old distrbutor shaft and make an oil priming tool out of it.  You can install this shaft in the end of a drill motor and stick it in the engine into the oil pump.  Turn the drill on and you will build oil pressure this way.  Watch your gauge as you are doing this.  The oil pressure will come up slowly.

Jerry

Just a side note on this.  I personally like to remove both valve covers when doing this so I can visually check oil flow to each and every rocker arm.  This can be messy, but is cheap insurance.  When I was building alot of engines I actually purchased two new valve covers from GM and cut the tops off so I could check the oil flow without the mess.  Also, JEGS sells the oil priming tool JohnZ mentions (different brand) for less than $20.00.

Paul
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Jerry@CHP
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« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2007, 06:43:56 PM »

Paul,

You just need the EOS for the initial break in,

Good luck,

Jerry
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1968RSZ28
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« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2007, 09:49:36 PM »

Thanks Jerry!
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sam
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« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2007, 09:50:53 PM »

Hate to tell you guys but I believe Rotella T has been changed. Unless you have the older style jug/quart it is now different. I have some of last years oil left but see the paint scheme has changed.  Sam Huh
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