Author Topic: Breaking in a motor  (Read 14738 times)

bob69

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Breaking in a motor
« on: January 14, 2006, 01:44:47 PM »
I finialy have my motor back together ( 302 30 over ) It's all new execpt the crank & rod's ( I needed to put bushings in the rod's to get the right fit) My question is how do I break it in. Thanks Bob        One other question since I have roller rockers ( true 1.5 ) should I gap at 30.

JohnZ

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2006, 05:33:27 PM »
Treat it reasonably well for the first couple of hundred miles, with varying speeds and loads, avoiding long stretches of constant high speed like freeway travel. Assuming you changed the oil and filter after first-fire and cam break-in, change it again after 100 miles, then at 500 miles, then at normal change intervals. With true 1.5 rockers, lash it at .030".  :)
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bob69

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2006, 05:16:11 AM »
How should I break in the cam, the guy at the shop said to run it at about 12,000 rpm's for about 5 min. and what oil weight should I use. thanks Bob

CNorton

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2006, 01:52:43 PM »
There's obviously something wrong with the statement "12,000 rpm for 5 minutes."  Is that a typo?

c

Brian K

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2006, 04:39:00 PM »
Well guess what my Father and Uncle and me did yesterday, just broke-in the solid lifter 427 motor in a complete rotisserie restored 69 Yenko Camaro clone we just finished for a customer. This is the  break-in procedure for all chevy solid lifter cams.

1: set ign. timing on no.1 cyl. readty to fire
2: prime engine oil system  (we use straight 30 weight non detergent oil for engine break-in)
3: make sure valve lash set.
4: re-install distributor set for no 1 ready to fire
5: do not install coil wire.
6: turn engine over with starter making sure engine developes oil pressure on your oil pressure gauge.
7: adj carb idle air bleed screws 1 1/4 turns out
8: adj. carb idle screw to 1/2 t0 1 turn above base idle adj, you are setting engine to run at about 1800 to  2200 rpm after the engine comes off the fast idle cam.
9: you are now ready to start engine (install coil wire).
10: start engine. if above have been done properly all things should go well
11: start engine and run for 15-20 minutes at 1800 to 2200 rpm.( do not rev or change rpm level above or below the 1800 to 2200 rpm. at this point not necessary to adj timing or set carb. these things will be done after cam break-in.
be sure to watch engine oil pressure gauge and water temp. do not let temp go over 200 to 210 degrees and check for leaks (oil and water). After 15 to 20 minute break in period shut off engine (stalling motor is better than key turning if its a manual trans), let engine cool, check and top off radiator. drain oil, change fillter (add new oil and filter whatever your owners manual  recommends) set engine timing, re-adj carb and re-adjust valves to proper valve setting.

any questions just post or email.

we have installed many chevy solid lifter cams.


bob69

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2006, 03:08:01 PM »
yea 1,200
There's obviously something wrong with the statement "12,000 rpm for 5 minutes." Is that a typo?

c

mikefam

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2007, 11:33:45 AM »
Can anyone explain to me the logic behind the cam break-in? What does that initial run time do for the cam? Does it assume that you installed new cam bushings?

Mike.
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Jerry@CHP

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2007, 01:00:09 PM »
VERY IMPORTANT!

Make sure that you use the Shell Rotella motor oil (15-40) for break in along with a can of GM's EOS.  If you do not follow these steps you will wipe the cam.  I'm sure many of you have read about the removal of zinc from motor oil.......and how camshafts are wiping all the time because of the removal of zinc.  Have been many articles on this as of late.  Zinc was a big part of most oils but now it is not.  It reduces friction and keeps wear to a minimum.  Zinc is still in the Rotella oil.  Available at Walmart.  EOS, buy it at any GM dealer. 

Engine has to run about 20-25 minutes at 1800-2200 rpm.  Put a house fan in front of the radiator to make sure the engine does not over heat.  If you do not follow these procedures, you will wipe the cam.   

Jerry

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2007, 01:06:30 PM »
Another foot note, get an old distrbutor shaft and make an oil priming tool out of it.  You can install this shaft in the end of a drill motor and stick it in the engine into the oil pump.  Turn the drill on and you will build oil pressure this way.  Watch your gauge as you are doing this.  The oil pressure will come up slowly.

Jerry

JohnZ

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2007, 03:50:09 PM »
Be sure you use a proper oil prime tool that duplicates the two spools at the bottom of the distributor housing (or an old distributor housing like Jerry said), or you won't get any oil to the lifters; the groove between those two spools forms the oil passage to the lifter galleries, and if they aren't there, it'll just pump the oil into the distributor hole and back into the pan (see photo below of a correct prime tool made by Tavia - that's what I use).

The cam lobes and lifter bases are lubricated by "splash" oil from the rods and mains, which is why the cam break-in procedure is important; if you just let it idle at "first-fire", you won't get enough oil to the cam and lifters, and you'll wipe the cam.

Any diesel oil that carries the "CI-4", CI-4+", or "CJ-4" API classification on the "donut" on the back of the bottle is what you want, plus the bottle of EOS; any brand is fine (Shell Rotella, Mobil Delvac, Chevron Delo, etc.) - what matters is the API classifications noted, which ensures an adequate blend of the ZDDP zinc anti-wear additive.

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1968RSZ28

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2007, 07:46:59 PM »
Jerry -

Do you recommend adding a can of GM Engine Oil Supplement (EOS) at every oil change or is this over-kill?  The reason for the removal of the anti-wear additives zinc & phosphorus from motor oils is that the auto manufacturers feel they are damaging the catalytic converters over time on the new cars.  Something we first generations guys don't have to worry about.   ;D

Paul  

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2007, 08:37:40 PM »
Another foot note, get an old distrbutor shaft and make an oil priming tool out of it.  You can install this shaft in the end of a drill motor and stick it in the engine into the oil pump.  Turn the drill on and you will build oil pressure this way.  Watch your gauge as you are doing this.  The oil pressure will come up slowly.

Jerry

Just a side note on this.  I personally like to remove both valve covers when doing this so I can visually check oil flow to each and every rocker arm.  This can be messy, but is cheap insurance.  When I was building alot of engines I actually purchased two new valve covers from GM and cut the tops off so I could check the oil flow without the mess.  Also, JEGS sells the oil priming tool JohnZ mentions (different brand) for less than $20.00.

Paul

Jerry@CHP

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2007, 11:43:56 PM »
Paul,

You just need the EOS for the initial break in,

Good luck,

Jerry

1968RSZ28

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2007, 02:49:36 AM »
Thanks Jerry!

sam

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2007, 02:50:53 AM »
Hate to tell you guys but I believe Rotella T has been changed. Unless you have the older style jug/quart it is now different. I have some of last years oil left but see the paint scheme has changed.  Sam ???

JohnZ

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2007, 04:23:51 PM »
Hate to tell you guys but I believe Rotella T has been changed. Unless you have the older style jug/quart it is now different. I have some of last years oil left but see the paint scheme has changed.  Sam ???

That's the change from the CI-4 API classification to the new CJ-4 classification, which represents a reduction in the ZDDP concentration for use with the new 2008 diesel engines which have to use catalytic converters and/or particulate traps to meet the new Tier II diesel emission regulations. The ZDDP concentration in the new CJ-4 oil is still substantially higher than it is in the "SM" passenger car spark-ignition oils, and works equally as well as the CI-4 oil in our engines.
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sam

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2007, 06:10:12 PM »
Thanks John! That makes me happy.  Sam

bob69

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2007, 10:50:40 PM »
My 302 is breaking up arround 5000-6000 rpms and has a light knock ( only somethimes ) when under a load, Also sometimes when its ideling I hear a light knock, that stops when I pull the pcv valve. sounds like its in the valve train. Did I wipe a lobe? or what else could it be? I'm scared to drive it. Any help would be great. Thanks BOB

GaryL

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2007, 12:08:20 PM »
After break in, what oil do you use?
Gary

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JohnZ

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2007, 10:50:18 PM »
After break in, what oil do you use?

I'd recommend one of the 15W40 CI-4 or CJ-4 diesel oils (Shell Rotella, Mobil Delvac, Chevron Delo, etc.).
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GaryL

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2007, 12:49:35 AM »
I just ordered a case of Rotella 10-30. 15-40 is a little thick.
Gary

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fireZ

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2007, 03:33:10 PM »
What is the EOS supplement Jerry mentions from GM. Should it be used also after breakin?
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sam

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2007, 04:24:30 PM »
Does the Rotella 10W30 have the same additives as the 15W40? I thought the additives we need were only in the diesel grades. A lot of guys run 1/2 can of EOS at every oil change on the flat tappet motors. At least that is what they tell me anyhow.  Sam

1968RSZ28

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2007, 04:47:22 PM »
What is the EOS supplement Jerry mentions from GM.

EOS = Engine Oil Supplement.  It's available at any GM dealer.

Should it be used also after breakin?

No.  (I asked Jerry the same question.)   :)

Paul


JohnZ

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #24 on: April 24, 2007, 02:58:40 AM »
Does the Rotella 10W30 have the same additives as the 15W40? I thought the additives we need were only in the diesel grades. A lot of guys run 1/2 can of EOS at every oil change on the flat tappet motors. At least that is what they tell me anyhow.  Sam

ALL Rotella is diesel oil - it's available in several different weights. EOS is for break-in only; it contains several heavy additives that can clog an oil filter, which is why it's labeled specifically for break-in only.
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olympic69

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2007, 03:54:44 AM »
Does the Rotella 10W30 have the same additives as the 15W40? I thought the additives we need were only in the diesel grades. A lot of guys run 1/2 can of EOS at every oil change on the flat tappet motors. At least that is what they tell me anyhow.  Sam

The (API?) grades JohnZ listed will appear on the oil jug as he listed them, if the additive package IS the same- JohnZ's quote from above:

"I'd recommend one of the 15W40 CI-4 or CJ-4 diesel oils (Shell Rotella, Mobil Delvac, Chevron Delo, etc.)."

So if you choose another viscosity, look for those listed qualifications which indicate the appropriate additiives are present.

Rob
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tom

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2007, 10:43:05 AM »
I am planning to re-fire my motor for the first time after several years. Will hit the Englishtown swap this weekend and look for an old distributor to prime the motor with. Since the motor has not turned in years should I also be using the rotella?

Tom
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1968RSZ28

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #27 on: April 24, 2007, 09:21:01 PM »
Tom -

I believe CJ has an old distributor for sale:

http://www.camaros.org/forum/index.php?topic=2025.msg12762;boardseen#new

Paul

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #28 on: April 25, 2007, 05:50:02 PM »
Another foot note, get an old distrbutor shaft and make an oil priming tool out of it.  You can install this shaft in the end of a drill motor and stick it in the engine into the oil pump.  Turn the drill on and you will build oil pressure this way.  Watch your gauge as you are doing this.  The oil pressure will come up slowly.

Jerry

Thanks, but I'm just looking for an oil primer, my dist works (or at least worked) last time fired. I was just wondering if I should use the break in oil after letting the engine sit so long.

Tom
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o

Gambitt

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #29 on: April 25, 2007, 06:27:53 PM »
You can buy brand new Proform oil primers on ebay for around 10-15 dollars, plus shipping.

tom

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #30 on: April 25, 2007, 06:41:35 PM »
Just figured I'd be at the swap anyway, why not grab an old distributor while there. I presume any old small block dist will work. Thanks Jerry for the idea.

Tom
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tom

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #31 on: September 02, 2007, 12:55:39 PM »
Jerry,

Another foot note, get an old distrbutor shaft and make an oil priming tool out of it.  You can install this shaft in the end of a drill motor and stick it in the engine into the oil pump.  Turn the drill on and you will build oil pressure this way.  Watch your gauge as you are doing this.  The oil pressure will come up slowly.

Jerry
Jerry,

What needs to be done with the old distributor to use it to prime the motor?

Thanks,

Tom
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looking for a 69 export model (KPH) speed
o

Jerry@CHP

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #32 on: September 02, 2007, 04:25:49 PM »
Remove the dist shaft and use as the primer.  You will also need to make a metal or aluminum sleeve that goes over the flattened end of the shaft and you'll have to pin this bushing on the shaft.  This is needed so you don't have the shaft slippping off the oil pump when spinning it.

Jerry

JohnZ

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2007, 12:07:50 AM »
I've used a primer tool for years made by Tavia - it has the spool near the bottom that matches the spool shape on the distributor housing which creates the oil passage from the main oil gallery to the lifter galleries; if you just use a plain shaft that doesn't have that spool, the pump won't create oil pressure - it'll just dump oil down the distributor hole back into the pan through the holes that align with the slot in the center of the spool. Any decent speed shop has them.

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dutch

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #34 on: September 04, 2007, 01:22:19 AM »

What needs to be done with the old distributor to use it to prime the motor?

Thanks,

Tom:

   All I did was take the dist. gear off and grind away all of the teeth that would normally mesh with the cam gear teeth so once you drop it down it won't mesh with the cam and try and spin it at the same time you are turning the oil pump to bring up the pressure...
   As long as the diameter of the ground section (where the teeth were) ends up being the same as the top section of the gear - or slightly smaller in diameter it will work great, sealing off the oil passages as any normal distributor would and yet still surround and engage the oil pump slot in a positive way.
   I also took the advance mechanism section off (where the springs and weights normally reside) and ground the round shaft into a hex shape so a cordless drill could be easily grip it and all was done... 
   Randy   

dutch

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #35 on: September 04, 2007, 01:26:19 AM »

What needs to be done with the old distributor to use it to prime the motor?

Thanks,

Tom:

   All I did was take the dist. gear off and grind away all of the teeth that would normally mesh with the cam gear teeth so once you drop it down it won't mesh with the cam and try and spin it at the same time you are turning the oil pump to bring up the pressure...
   As long as the diameter of the ground section (where the teeth were) ends up being the same as the top section of the gear - or slightly smaller in diameter it will work great, sealing off the oil passages as any normal distributor would and yet still surround and engage the oil pump slot in a positive way.
   I also took the advance mechanism section off (where the springs and weights normally reside) and ground the round shaft into a hex shape so a cordless drill could be easily grip it and all was done... 
   Randy   

Sorry I meant 'same as the LOWER section of the gear'...  Randy

Oaklyss

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Re: Breaking in a motor
« Reply #36 on: September 08, 2007, 10:08:37 PM »
After cam break-in, oil change, checks, and all the other stuff, take it out on the road and if everything seams ok, its time to seat the rings. The cross hatch hone pattern on the cylinders is there for that purpose. Do not baby the motor, get on it hard while rolling. Vary RPM, speed, and load. You only have a short time before the cylinders smooth out, so hammer it a few times. Otherwise you will have an oil burner.
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