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Author Topic: black on tailpan on ss cars  (Read 39141 times)
Charley
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« Reply #90 on: December 19, 2009, 04:30:26 PM »

LOL...Or maybe it was gloss when new as the owner stated.
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Pex68
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« Reply #91 on: December 19, 2009, 11:16:51 PM »

LOL, or maybe not...memory fades with time & age but to each his own.  To bad those pic's on the dealer lot weren't better.
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Chris P
1968 Sequoia Green SS 396/325 M20
Charley
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« Reply #92 on: December 20, 2009, 12:46:53 AM »

That is why it is nice when we find low mile cars with orig owners that we can ask. The low mile takes alot of the fading memory out of the equation.
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Pex68
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« Reply #93 on: December 20, 2009, 04:12:57 PM »

Charley, I agree with you 100% on being totally enthusiastic about finding survivor cars to inspect and document but just because one car is one way doesn't mean they were all that way…(hell my car has a body colored firewall (no black out) and it came from the factory that way)  But that's why places like CRG is awesome because they compile data on many, many cars before making any call on what the DATA proves.  Unfortunately this is a paint finish dilemma where many factors come into play such as fading, polishing, refinishing, ect...and without a lot of hard evidence it's impossible to say what's absolutely correct here and probably why there’s no definitive right or wrong.  And as for memory fading, how many times do you say to yourself "I could swear it was this way" or "wow, I don't remember it being that way" when going back and referencing pictures or the AIM when working on your car...I know I do it all the time & that's why I took over 700 pictures when pulling my 59000 mile car apart and probably why it got a score of 91.6% correct my first year in legends concours.  Just saying the original owner may remember it one way, and the car may only have 26000 miles on it but it’s still 40 years old and even if the owner only washed & waxed it once a month, that’s still 480 times that panel and paint have been buffed and rubbed on.  Even at a ¼ of that number semi gloss will be getting pretty shiny.
Again, just my opinion and opinions are like a**holes, everyone’s got one! Grin
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Chris P
1968 Sequoia Green SS 396/325 M20
Charley
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« Reply #94 on: December 20, 2009, 04:28:05 PM »

This car is just another example of survivors that I have seen that have the gloss tail panel. I have yet to see a orig paint survivor with Satin tail panel. The odds seem pretty slim to me that these panels are shiny because of waxing.
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Buddy
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« Reply #95 on: December 21, 2009, 04:27:04 PM »

Pex68...Give it up...Charlie believes what he believes and even though 90% of the experts and others believe otherwise you will NOT change his mind. It's like convincing the far left that Obama is destroying our country. Ain't gonna happen  Cool

Sorry Charlie..no disrespect here.

Move on...there's nothing to see here......
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Charley
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« Reply #96 on: December 21, 2009, 04:32:33 PM »

LOL...Where are the 90% of the experts ? Who are they ?
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Jerry@CHP
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« Reply #97 on: December 23, 2009, 10:08:14 PM »

The experts are on that other site.  I'm still learning.  LOL.

I'll throw my hat into the ring.  Originally, many thought these panels were satin black.  Research has indicated that they had more gloss, but not like a slick painted, wet sanded and buffed out black.  More like an egg shell black which is really black lacquer w/o buffing and wet sanding.  That's how my new Chevelle was and other survivor Camaros that I've inspected over the years. 

Merry Christmas Everyone!  Ho, Ho Ho!

Jerry
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Charley
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« Reply #98 on: December 24, 2009, 01:48:32 AM »

Thankyou...That description fits with what I am seeing on the green survivor I posted pics of. You can see that it is not blocked smooth, but it is glossy.
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Jerry@CHP
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« Reply #99 on: December 24, 2009, 08:41:16 AM »

Same way on J. DeMesy's silver SS car that was at the Camaro Nationals this past June.  The past owner's family had hired me to inspect the car and try and find it a good home.  This SS396 car was one of the nicest original paint cars that I've seen.

But again, I'm no expert.

Jerry   
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Sauron327
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« Reply #100 on: December 24, 2009, 09:27:27 AM »



This is what I have been trying to explain to others.  Perhaps they have never picked up a gun nor understand the principles of lacquer or the appearance it has when shot. People think full gloss and immediately compare it to buffed lacquer or urethane, both of which scream glossiness. But unbuffed lacquer has a semi-gloss appearance. And in time with maintenance may get a tad shinier. I've buffed satin paint to a gloss before and it takes more than a little elbow grease with wax to achieve it. We shot a fender with lacquer on a black 69 last month. The entire car was shot with lacquer years ago and until that fender was buffed the difference was night and day.  I'm not an origionality expert and can't say if all tails were painted identically. This information is offered for the purposes of paint and it's characteristics and the variations therein.

Thankyou...That description fits with what I am seeing on the green survivor I posted pics of. You can see that it is not blocked smooth, but it is glossy.
The experts are on that other site.  I'm still learning.  LOL.

I'll throw my hat into the ring.  Originally, many thought these panels were satin black.  Research has indicated that they had more gloss, but not like a slick painted, wet sanded and buffed out black.  More like an egg shell black which is really black lacquer w/o buffing and wet sanding.  That's how my new Chevelle was and other survivor Camaros that I've inspected over the years.  

Merry Christmas Everyone!  Ho, Ho Ho!

Jerry
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Buddy
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hurcousa
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« Reply #101 on: December 24, 2009, 03:08:56 PM »


Quote
Thankyou...That description fits with what I am seeing on the green survivor I posted pics of. You can see that it is not blocked smooth, but it is glossy.

He just said' NOT GLOSS'.....  Roll Eyes Egg Shell is a Semi.
I am confused with this statement....... it is not blocked smooth, but it is glossy.HuhHuhHuhHuhHuh?

Smiley

Just keeping going for the fun of it.



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Charley
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« Reply #102 on: December 24, 2009, 04:02:26 PM »

LOL...If you look at the picture of the green tail panel on the survivor you can see the texture in the reflection. just like if you spray straight lacquer and don't sand an rub it. It is glossy though.
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Sauron327
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« Reply #103 on: December 24, 2009, 04:22:58 PM »


Quote
Thankyou...That description fits with what I am seeing on the green survivor I posted pics of. You can see that it is not blocked smooth, but it is glossy.

He just said' NOT GLOSS'.....  Roll Eyes Egg Shell is a Semi.
I am confused with this statement....... it is not blocked smooth, but it is glossy.HuhHuhHuhHuhHuh?

Smiley

Just keeping going for the fun of it.





I'll try this yet again. Spray two panels with black LACQUER. Buff one, leave the other one alone. You will see a difference besides the fact one has more peel than the other. The only way lacquer's shine is enhanced and maximized is by polishing, or reflowed like they did then. So a tailpanel will appear glossy but not to the extent of which it is capable. It's glossiness is relative to a buffed panel.  Anyone who has shot a car with lacquer knows it looks horrible until buffed.
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4P-O1
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« Reply #104 on: December 24, 2009, 09:29:21 PM »

I'm no expert Wink,but I learn something new all the time. I always try to replicate what I see regardless of what everyone says. Here is a photo of an original paint 67 big block rear panel. I removed the taillamp for inspection and found that the area behind the taillamp ,that was not faded,to be what I would call semi-gloss. Notice it is about the same as the NOS inner fender panel to the left of the car. 60% gloss is what the paint books show for blackout,and that is what I will use to replicate what I have found on this car. The lower rocker panels are the same color. I will take more detailed photos before starting the restoration next fall. Many more details to iron out and parts to gather! Andy V
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Andy
1967 L78
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