Author Topic: 19N509257 DZ 302 Block on ebay  (Read 1622 times)

BULLITT65

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Re: 19N509257 DZ 302 Block on ebay
« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2018, 05:05:59 AM »
great info. Any ideas on why it was on the pad still so late into the spring. (all ZL-1's would have been Norwood I think)
1969 garnet red Z/28 46k mile unrestored X77
-Looking for 3192477 (front) spiral shocks 3192851 (rear)
-Looking for an original LOF soft ray windshield
-Looking for original Delco side post negative battery cable part # 6297651AV

william

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Re: 19N509257 DZ 302 Block on ebay
« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2018, 08:15:39 PM »
Yup, all ZL1s were built at Norwood. No idea why some were VIN stamped on the pad.

ZLP955

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Re: 19N509257 DZ 302 Block on ebay
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2018, 11:34:38 AM »
What is the earliest vin stamped by the oil filter? what is the latest known vin stamped on the pad? (LA and Norwood examples if you have them)
I have 19L528xxx stamped on the pad, and have seen them into 19L530xxx (which is nearing the end of LA production for the '69 MY) also on the pad. By contrast, I know the current owner of 19L5023xx and it's stamped by the oil filter.....
Tim in Australia.
1969 04A Van Nuys Z/28. Cortez Silver, Dark Blue interior, VE3 bumper, Z21, Z23, D55/U17, D80, flat hood.
Sold at Clippinger Chevrolet in Covina, CA. Ex-E/MP at Lions Dragstrip in Long Beach.

69Z28-RS

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Re: 19N509257 DZ 302 Block on ebay
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2018, 02:51:12 PM »
There was a federal requirement (from Aug/Sep '68) that the engine be 'uniquely identified, and VIN stamping is most expedient at time of installation , but there was no federal requirement on where it was stamped.

The issue of *where* the VIN was stamped on '69 engines, and the 'inconsistency' in location thru the year, makes me think that Chevrolet engineering management to address the requirement wrote specifications allowing for either location to be stamped (so long as ONE of them was); the LA and Norwood plants apparently chose different locations to meet this requirement.

It was probably faster/easier to stamp the engine low on the side, immediately before or after the transmission was stamped.  It's obviously easier to rear on the pad!  It may have varied with the person being tasked with that job, or possibly whether the engine was 'dressed out' with alternator/etc, or not, at the stamping time. 
Gary W / 09C 69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood tint
69 Corvette convertible, silver/black 350 hp,
60 Corvette white/red, 72 Corvette coupe, '70 Mach I 
90 ZR1 red/red #246, 90 ZR1 white/gray #2466
72 El Camino, '55-'56-'57 Nomads, '55-'57 B/A Sedan