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Author Topic: 68 350 engine - how to start  (Read 1301 times)
joesauer
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« on: February 14, 2014, 01:33:55 PM »

Have a (numbers correct) 68 Camaro 350 engine that's been in a boat for years.....time to put it back in a Camaro.  It's been sitting in the boat, unstarted,  for 8/9 years.  Fuel was drained, new oil put in (years ago).  What's the best way to prepare it for cranking/starting.  Don't want to damage the cylinder walls, etc,
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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2014, 01:35:52 PM »

Make sure it doesn't have a marine cam in it?  Smiley

I'd pull the plugs, squirt a little oil in the cylinders..  let the oil soak around the rings for awhile (a day or two) before trying to start.  Make sure you have good fuel, and the carburetor isn't going to leak ?.. ...  a lot depends on 1) Did you install the engine in the boat?  ie. are you familiar with it's running capability prior to going into the boat (since the last time the engine was ran?), and 2) how the engine/boat was stored..  indoors or outdoors ?  in what kind of environment...
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
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Mike S
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« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2014, 01:51:08 PM »

 One way that has worked for me a few times is to remove the plugs and put something light like marvel mystery oil into the cylinders and let it sit for an hour.
While the cylinder lube is sitting remove the distributor and drive the oil pump gear to push (new oil) throughout the motor to get the bearings lubed. I used an old distributor for this. You can use a large screw drive with the handle cut off and put into a drill too. Anything to reach into and engage the oil pump drive shaft.
Move the engine by hand first (flywheel or socket on damper bolt) to see if the motor will 'break lose' and then the using the starter motor, cycle the engine several times to circulate the oil.
 Ready to start-
Find #1 TDC and reinstall the distributor and plugs. Align the rotor to the #1 terminal on the distributor cap and manually rotate the distributor until the points just open (use a meter for this part).
You should be ready to start the motor at this point if the distributor indexing is close.
Adjust the dwell and timing afterwards.

 I believe this to be the safest approach to starting a motor where the bearings may be dry and the rings stuck due to moisture instead of putting in gas and starting 'dry'.

Mike
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WayneinNZ
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« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2014, 04:29:55 PM »

Mike S has hit the nail on the head with that proceedure.
Just as a matter of interest, what are the numbers on the engine?
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z28z11
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2014, 10:23:55 AM »

One way that has worked for me a few times is to remove the plugs and put something light like marvel mystery oil into the cylinders and let it sit for an hour.
While the cylinder lube is sitting remove the distributor and drive the oil pump gear to push (new oil) throughout the motor to get the bearings lubed. I used an old distributor for this. You can use a large screw drive with the handle cut off and put into a drill too. Anything to reach into and engage the oil pump drive shaft.
Move the engine by hand first (flywheel or socket on damper bolt) to see if the motor will 'break lose' and then the using the starter motor, cycle the engine several times to circulate the oil.
 Ready to start-
Find #1 TDC and reinstall the distributor and plugs. Align the rotor to the #1 terminal on the distributor cap and manually rotate the distributor until the points just open (use a meter for this part).
You should be ready to start the motor at this point if the distributor indexing is close.
Adjust the dwell and timing afterwards.

 I believe this to be the safest approach to starting a motor where the bearings may be dry and the rings stuck due to moisture instead of putting in gas and starting 'dry'.

Mike

Mike has it right. The only additional steps I would take (I did this same thing with my LS-5 454 that had not been started in 19 years) is make sure you prime the engine oiling by using a priming tool (these specific tools use a bushing that directs the oil through the cam galleries, which feed the main bearing oil galleries). Rotate the crank 90 degrees, pump the pressure up (or give it enough time to pressurize the galleries), do this in 90 degree increments until you have completed one revolution of the crank, This makes sure you won't have a dry bearing surface before you turn it over with the starter. Worked for me - the old Chevelle cranked right up, nary a problem, except for dislodging a few generations of Brown Recluse buddies.

Ditto on the Marvel Mystery Oil squirted into the cylinders. A few pumps with an oil can into each before you start to turn it over insured the rings will break free without a lot of torque.

Regards,
Steve
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ko-lek-tor
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« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2014, 01:05:12 PM »

Man, I don't even want to comment when I see all the precautions you guys suggest, 'cause I am just one practical country boy, hillbilly,if you will (a compliment,thank you=someone with smarts and common sense). I agree, all those things said are ok. I even prime new engines. But I have to tell you, my suggestion is simple, hook a battery to it. If it turns over, dump some gas in it. Put one of those light up things that tell if you have spark on a plug wire, and let er rip. It is either going to run or not. Once she fires off,look for oil pressure, it only takes a second or two for pressure, if none, shut er down and investigate. Sitting a long, long time? Pull the drain plug. If oil doesn't come fly'n out, pull the pan,cause it has turned to molasses thick sludge and I have seen that kill a motor more than once. Don't make it harder than it needs to be. I have gotten a lot, and I mean a LOT of antique engines, from tractors and cars, you name it, unstuck, resurrected, whatever. The oil in the cylinder is not bad idea, but I would crank it dry to try and blow all that crap out of the cylinder first before caking it up with sticky oil almost insuring it will get down around the rings. Course if its stuck(which you never mention) you gotta put something in the cylinders. In that case use 50/50 acetone and auto trans fluid. I admittedly am lazy and instead of pulling plugs and risk breaking off, I just pour it down carb...and I ain't talk'in gallons either that would give you a hydraulic lock and those "S" shaped rods. dump like a pint in,crank it over 2-3 X's, repeat. once it has run, heated up, then I might attempt to fight those plugs.
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z28z11
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« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2014, 06:27:06 PM »

I forgot to add I did drain the old oil off on my LS5 and replace the filter before priming - after 19 years untouched, the oil appeared just as fresh as when it was stored (unheated/conditioned) garage; I did drain the gas tank and replaced with non-ethanol straight gas (same as what was in it). Used the old gas in my lawn tractor later in the summer - was still good, not varnished. New plugs, which was a problem due to big block, headers and air conditioning.

Never smoked, fouled plugs or anything obnoxious - considering the lack of care over such a long time, I was fortunate to resurrect it intact.

Regards,
Steve
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joesauer
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« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2014, 12:17:30 PM »

Thanks for the input.  Mike & Steve....like your suggestions & will fire it up the way you suggest.  No internal modifications were done to the 350 before stuffing it in my "old" boat years ago.   Will provide serial #'s at a later date when I decide what to do with it.  Have a 350 crate engine in my 68 now (only 4000 miles on it).  Need to do some homework on the engine #'s vs build date for my 68....would be a great if there's a match.
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