CRG Discussion Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
April 25, 2014, 03:29:01 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Welcome to the CRG Discussion Forum!
Forum registration problems: Make sure you enter your email correctly and you check your spam box first. *Then* email KurtS2@gmail for help.
97557 Posts in 11721 Topics by 4582 Members
Latest Member: gplus
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  CRG Discussion Forum
|-+  Camaro Research Group Discussion
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  starting my resto
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: starting my resto  (Read 914 times)
RPO Z22
Newbie
*
Posts: 3



View Profile
« on: December 23, 2013, 09:54:54 AM »

I have a 68 RS that is mostly original and Arizona sun baked.  Just looking for tips on where to start on the restoration process and if anyone needs info about the car before and during teardown. Its a Nov. built LOS car with orig. 327, Sequoia Green,  parchment custom deluxe, white vinyl top, PS, power drum.
Logged
ko-lek-tor
Member
***
Posts: 346



View Profile Email
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2013, 03:13:58 PM »

1st thing I would recommend is getting lots of different size ziplock bags or what you prefer and storage boxes or totes to put components in and a log book to write down different aspects such as making diagrams, documenting part #'s, etc.. along with taking pictures of everything,even stuff you are not sure of their significance. Make sure they are close up, detailed pics too as to see how stuff was mounted,how it comes apart and markings and paint details. Buy an AIM and put it in the reading room (translates bathroom for me) and study it as compared to what you are dis-assembling. If you damage a bolt or anything save it as well in the baggies to compare when you replace with like kind.Save all old gaskets and weatherstrip as samples to compare against replacements. I feel a complete dis-assembly is the only way to do a quality job, but you better decide before the 1st bolt is removed if you have the fortitude and funds to see it through and this may be a long term process. The less you remove, the more compromised the quality of resto, as masking around stuff is usually harder and more detectable as amateur-ish. If you do not feel you have the stomach for this, then my advice would be to leave the car alone and keep it original refurbishing only components needed to make car function well. The next step would be to study what parts are available, their costs. My own preference would be used good parts opposed to reproduction or carefully considering the quality differences which are almost all covered here on the site in forum posts which will save time and money by doing your homework first, except for soft parts like weatherstripping were NOS or good original is hard to find and cost prohibitive for most. Be  aware that it will cost about the same whether it is a Z or a 6 cylinder with the exception of some engine components so a restoration has to be a passion with the understanding that the whole endeavor probably will cost more than what the end result will be worth.The word restoration is mis-used as it means to restore as original. Good luck.
Logged

Putting you First...Keeps me First. Talent on loan from God. Helping the hobbyist and exposing the fraud
1969 SS/RS 396 coupe Hugger Orange X22 712 bought in 79
1969 SS 350 coupe LeMans Blue 713 bought in 79
1969 307 4spd. coupe Daytona Yellow 711 bought in 85
MyRed67
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 647


SZZLN 67

michael-l.campbell@hotmail.com
View Profile
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2013, 01:12:00 AM »

1st thing I would recommend is getting lots of different size ziplock bags or what you prefer and storage boxes or totes to put components in and a log book to write down different aspects such as making diagrams, documenting part #'s, etc.. along with taking pictures of everything,even stuff you are not sure of their significance. Make sure they are close up, detailed pics too as to see how stuff was mounted,how it comes apart and markings and paint details. Buy an AIM and put it in the reading room (translates bathroom for me) and study it as compared to what you are dis-assembling. If you damage a bolt or anything save it as well in the baggies to compare when you replace with like kind.Save all old gaskets and weatherstrip as samples to compare against replacements. I feel a complete dis-assembly is the only way to do a quality job, but you better decide before the 1st bolt is removed if you have the fortitude and funds to see it through and this may be a long term process. The less you remove, the more compromised the quality of resto, as masking around stuff is usually harder and more detectable as amateur-ish. If you do not feel you have the stomach for this, then my advice would be to leave the car alone and keep it original refurbishing only components needed to make car function well. The next step would be to study what parts are available, their costs. My own preference would be used good parts opposed to reproduction or carefully considering the quality differences which are almost all covered here on the site in forum posts which will save time and money by doing your homework first, except for soft parts like weatherstripping were NOS or good original is hard to find and cost prohibitive for most. Be  aware that it will cost about the same whether it is a Z or a 6 cylinder with the exception of some engine components so a restoration has to be a passion with the understanding that the whole endeavor probably will cost more than what the end result will be worth.The word restoration is mis-used as it means to restore as original. Good luck.
Very well put!  Couldn't have said it any better.  I have restified my 67 from the Ground up, every nut, bolt, screw, etc., and I could not have done it to the degree I did without the advice of members here.  Thank you all!  If you want to do it right, the key word is "Do your Homework".  And quite often double, and triple check your Homework.
Logged

1967 Camaro  LOS  11A
Original Engine   Z - Tribute
Mike C.    NW - Illinois
hotrod68
Member
***
Posts: 473


almost finished

rusticman48@aol
View Profile Email
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2013, 03:14:30 AM »

  Yes.......it cannot be overstated enough........as you disassemble the car put EVERYTHING in Zip-Loc bags or boxes and LABEL them. No matter what you think, there will be bolts and screws and parts where you will forget where they go. I also took my '68 completely apart and when the time came to reassemble it the labeled bags were invaluable. Put as much as possible in the same place as well--try and store everything in one location and do it by category--fuel, brakes, interior....etc.
  An Assembly Instruction Manual ( AIM ) is also invaluable. There are a surprising number of parts you can still get through GM, although they will likely be pricey. Some will be 'replacement' parts and not NOS too, so that's a consideration. It helped me to get all the catalogs I could.....i.e.   Rick's, NPD, Ground-Up   etc and study the parts they selll and what is correct and what is not. If you can get NOS parts, GET THEM. Half of the reproduction stuff is not GM quality and it won't fit quite right--especially sheetmetal.
  Good luck and welcome to the world of taking a car apart and putting it back together again. It's not that hard if you do your homework. Knowledge is everything. Hope this helps.
Logged

HotRod'68  1968 coupe undergoing frame-off resto/rod. 386/350/4.11s
69 SS 350 X-55
Newbie
*
Posts: 16


View Profile Email
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2013, 08:45:46 AM »

Awesome! I have had the Fisher body,GM Chassis service and an AIM since mid 80s just now starting and want to do it right. Just recently got a Ricks,Classic industries and got sticker shock when comparing them to their mid 80s catalogs.Ther is just so much more parts available now. Ko-lec-tor  must also be a mind reader as I was just about to post  something similar to RPO Z22 post . This site and Team Camaro is a huge source of wisdom and knowledge. I wish the Internet had been around before I screwed my cars "restoration" up the first time around! Good luck to all on your projects!
Logged
67rs327
Member
***
Posts: 40



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2013, 10:34:06 AM »

Coincidence - I picked up almost the exact car about 6 months ago (only a '67 - is also a 11 LOS car). Its a #s matching L30/M20 that had been in storage for 28 years. Life has gotten in the way some  so the only thing I've done is change the oil and replace a window crank I  found at a flea market! This has been a blessing since the time I did manage to make has been spent researching the car and corresponding with the great people on the CRG Forum site!
Resist the urge to go out and start buying parts and accessories off the shelf.  I did that the first couple of months and now I have a bench full that I've started returning in favor of better quality and fit. Best  thing I did was to start up conversations with experineced <& trusted> people like you find here at CRG  - show the car in the light for what it is and what it is not - and realize that this is not a 2 episode project like you see on TV. I've had a great time w/it so far and have barely turned a wrench.  Enjoy the car piece by piece - and keep in touch - I'm sure we'll have notes to share.
Logged

1967rs L30/M20 Bolero Red - LOS 11A.
Chris - New Hampshire.
hotrod68
Member
***
Posts: 473


almost finished

rusticman48@aol
View Profile Email
« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2013, 04:30:25 AM »

  rs327 is so right--buy the parts as you need them! These projects can stretch into months and even years, and the repro industry is always improving. New and better parts are coming out everyday as the demand becomes greater for parts that actually fit and work as the OEM pieces did. A good example: the heater control panel. My car's heater control had 2 broken levers, one that was pot metal and almost impossible to repair. So I bought a new unit that was an "exact GM reproduction". The fit and finish was virtually identical, but compared to the original control panel, the repro lettering on the thing wasn't even close. I had to drill out the rivets and take a brand-new unit apart just to change the lens. There are the little things that drive you nuts.
  You'll learn as you go and it's fun and exciting. If I can help in any way feel free to message me. I'm sure the others feel the same. This is all about keeping our beloved 1st-Gens around forever. I've owned my '68 for 30 years now. I got it in May of 1983 when I was 25 years old. Over the years I've raced it, neglected it and cursed it, but the love affair remains and now I pamper it. Just the other day I was driving it to town and a guy in a new Camaro came up beside me, honked his horn, and grinned ear-to-ear and gave a thumbs-up. That makes it all worthwhile. Folks, we own history.
Logged

HotRod'68  1968 coupe undergoing frame-off resto/rod. 386/350/4.11s
jmcbeth
Member
***
Posts: 195


1st and 5th Gen Camaros


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2013, 07:04:22 AM »

Excellent advice all around! I am in tear down phase of my '69 now. Couple of other ideas:

1. I make notes of particularly difficult disassemblies.
2. I will write the AIM section, page, and part number on the ziplock bag.
3. I have a number of storage bins. I keep a list of what is in each bin.
4. Another catalog worth having is AMK fasteners. They do a nice job of cross referencing with the GM part numbers from the AIM.
5. I tend to blast and repaint parts during disassembly.

Enjoy! this is amazingly relaxing and fun work.
Logged

John
1969 Camaro Z/28 RS
Numbers Matching
68camaroz28
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 862



View Profile Email
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2013, 10:25:33 AM »

Excellent advice all around! I am in tear down phase of my '69 now. Couple of other ideas:

1. I make notes of particularly difficult disassemblies.
2. I will write the AIM section, page, and part number on the ziplock bag.
3. I have a number of storage bins. I keep a list of what is in each bin.
4. Another catalog worth having is AMK fasteners. They do a nice job of cross referencing with the GM part numbers from the AIM.
5. I tend to blast and repaint parts during disassembly.

Enjoy! this is amazingly relaxing and fun work.

Good advice by everyone but another key point and maybe it was mentioned but take digital pictures of how it was assembled before you tear it apart and bag/identify. Check the AIM to see what it shows vs. how it was before you took it apart. You just cannot have enough info. Look at it as you are writing a book. Smiley Another thing, check out build threads on team Camaro as you can grab lots of info or see cars that might be similar in nature. Be patient and have fun as it takes a lot of money, time, and patience.
Check out our 68Z build thread as it has a lot of detail if interested.
Happy New Year one and all.....
Logged

Chick
68 Z/28 NOR 01B Orig motor/trans/rear
69 Z/28 NOR 07A Orig Block & GM Cross-ram/carbs
69 L34 Rest. Nova Father/Son Car
69 L78 Surv Nova Purch 4/69 31K miles
67 L89 Corv Tribute
68 Corv 427/400 Orig motor
07 Corv Z06
R 68Z build- http://www.camaros.net/forums/showthread.php?t=182584
KurtS
CRG Coordinator
*****
Posts: 3072


View Profile Email
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2013, 10:10:35 PM »

Several questions come to mind:
There are threads about 68 RS grilles and brake drum styles under 'Research Topics'.
And what's the code on the master cylinder?
Logged

Kurt S
CRG
67rs327
Member
***
Posts: 40



View Profile
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2013, 12:47:58 PM »

On  the '67 11A LOS: 5452310
Logged

1967rs L30/M20 Bolero Red - LOS 11A.
Chris - New Hampshire.
KurtS
CRG Coordinator
*****
Posts: 3072


View Profile Email
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2013, 02:28:35 PM »

That's the correct casting #. The application code is stamped on the upper corner.
http://www.camaros.org/images/pages/chassis/master_cyl_drum.jpg
Logged

Kurt S
CRG
69glacierblue
Member
***
Posts: 44



View Profile Email
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2014, 11:08:21 AM »

Along with AIM and catalogs another book I felt was somewhat helpful and a good overview in areas was Camaro Restoration Guide 1967-1969 by Jason Scott.  Good luck with your restoration and enjoy the ride, it's a long one but well worth it!
Logged

Dennis
'69 SS350 Vert (X55) 4-sp.
'10 2SSRS RJT M6
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.094 seconds with 18 queries.