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Author Topic: 8.2 10 bolt differential  (Read 1619 times)
clean68rs
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« on: December 18, 2013, 09:10:00 PM »

How much power can you put to the 8.2 rear end. I have been reading up on them and they don't get good reviews. Anyway I'm installing a Powertrax locker to get the pozzy traction.
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elcamino72
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« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2013, 09:18:06 AM »

The power isn't necessarily the problem, it is how hard will you launch your car and how well will it hook on that launch.  Your car could have 500hp+ but if your rear suspension isn't set up to put all that to the ground with no or minimal wheel spin then perhaps you won't have a problem.  Fresh, well set-up Rear axles are usually only grenaded when someone abuses the car or drags it or when the car is designed to hook and not spin at all.

If you have a car that is designed to hook and not spin, then I suggest something more stout like a beefed up 12 bolt, 9" or Dana 60.  If you have a car that you like to run on the street and occasionally have fun with and you don't have an insane amount of torque or horsepower then I would say you would be fine with the 10.2.
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CNorton
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« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2013, 09:24:02 AM »

There are several factors that come into play with the 10-bolt.  One is the power level, another is traction, and another is driving style.  If you have a stick shift, put on sticky tires, and head to the drag strip, the life expectancy of the unit will be fairly short even with 300 horsepower.  If you have stock tires (not drag radials), a Powerglide, and you drive sanely, it will last much longer, even with 500 horsepower.   Wheel hop under acceleration is a prime consideration.  That will take out the axles sooner rather than later.  Putting in a posi-traction will enhance traction but better traction leads to wheel hop unless you use a slapper bar or other device designed to control wheel hop.  Those parts are not bullet-proof and if you challenge them, eventually you're going to come home on the hook.  You will control your own destiny through your driving style.

c
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Everett#2390
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« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2013, 08:30:09 PM »

Mr. Norton brings up a good point in using an auto trans as the power application is more forgiving than 'shocking' the driveline with a clutch, aka, 5000 rpm clutch dumps.
I had a 8.2 inch diff in a '67 and moved it over to a '68 when I was drag racing.
It lasted 9 years/seasons running a 350 CID/PG/4.11/ 2900 lbs at an et of 13.40's using 28X10.5X14 slicks and traction bars with the snubber under the front spring eyes.
Then the carrier split. I smiled as the diff didn't owe me anything, I got my money's worth.
Driving technique is the key.
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clean68rs
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2013, 10:10:35 PM »


  Thank you everyone for your replies.
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hotrod68
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« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2013, 03:23:34 AM »

   An 8.2 10-bolt can take a lot of abuse, but torque killls them. There is a reason why Chevy put a 12-bolt behind their more powerful engines. As long as the tires don't hook but spin, a 10-bolt will live. Once you get into the 12-second range with good tires, a 10-bolt is a time bomb. 10-bolts are notorious for ripping the spring mounts out of the axle tubes if you don't fully weld the mounts. I have the original 10-bolt I ran under my car for years and it's still intact, but once I stepped up to adult horsepower I got a 12-bolt. If you're in the 12s you're on the ragged edge. Good luck and I hope this helps.
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ggtsvnv
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« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2013, 12:01:45 PM »

another option for you would be to build/find a 8.5 ten bolt. It can take more abuse than the 8.2 and is cheaper to find. They came in Nova's after 1970 and are a direct bolt into a first gen Camaro. You could also find a 8.5 out of a second gen Camaro/F-bird after 71 (much more plentiful)but it will take a little modification to get it to work.
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clean68rs
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« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2013, 08:44:31 PM »


 Thanks again. I am learning a lot from all your replies.
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