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Author Topic: storage  (Read 2409 times)
sbmiano
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« on: October 08, 2013, 10:34:24 AM »

I have a couple cars one being a 69 z.  I have a finished garage in the northeast with heat.  What is the best way to store the car for the winter.  Last year I put plastic under the car, rolled up carpet under the tires disconnect the battery, kept the heat at 55 degrees and put a fan in the garage.  Is there anything I may be missing to avoid any condensation ect??

Thanks
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69 z28  Van Nuys 04D Legends Certified
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67 RS Ragtop
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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2013, 10:49:10 AM »

I also store in a heated garage in a colder winter climate, and found I must monitor the humidity as well. I also jack the car up to relax the springs, and allow me to ocassionally start and run the vehicle through the gears to keep the oil on the appropriate parts. If your vehicle is an automatic, it also helps to keep the oil in the torque converter, as some older units tend to drain down over time, overfilling the pan, and you will have the trans oil coming out the vent, onto your garage floor. I always lower the windows a bit to keep temps and humidity levels equal as well. JMO
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dannystarr
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2013, 12:07:12 PM »

67 Ragtop,
 Great idea on putting it up in the air. You just take it easy and start it, and slowly go thru the gears? Of course there is no load on the system, so it's just effortless for the car. Practically no gas pedal pressure at all. Keeps it all wet. I like that... Dannystarr
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Kelley W King
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2013, 01:00:41 PM »

mouse traps
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69 Z28 RS Scuncio Hi Performance
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« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2013, 01:14:18 PM »

I should have mentioned I use lots of drier sheets (change them out as the smell starts to go) as well, to keep the mice away, plus the car smells good too (added bonus).

Danny - yes I usually start it, let it get up to temp (and off high idle), then just run it through the gears, witout using any accelerator. It may be my OCD kicking in, but I have seen many components taken apart with rust above the lube line - I.E. Differentials and manual transmissions, that have been sitting for long periods. I always like to take the load off the springs as well, it keeps you at the specified ride height for a lot longer time (years), if you don't use your vehicle as a daily driver. JMO
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JohnZ
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« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2013, 01:22:20 PM »

Jacking the car up to "relax the springs" doesn't do anything for the springs, but it puts severe torsional loads on the control arm bushings they weren't designed to carry for extended periods; just leave it at normal design ride height (jackstands under the control arms) if you want it up off the floor.

The last thing you want to do is to start the engine while the car is being stored - the cold-start rich mixture byproducts and condensate go right into the crankcase, the oil doesn't get hot enough to boil them off, and those contaminants make the oil more acidic, which creates sludge. Unless you can get the car out and drive it for at least ten miles, just leave it alone and start it in the spring; the seals won't dry out - that's an old wives' tale.

I've been garage-storing my toys through Michigan winters for over 40 years, by filling the gas tank, add some air to the tires, close the windows, and put a Battery Tender on them occasionally. Rodents and humidity (corrosion) are winter enemies - focus on those issues. When Spring comes, check the tire pressures, start it, and drive it.
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BillOhio
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« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2013, 09:04:39 AM »

Any dryer sheets better than others? In the car, under it and engine compartment? I have used moth balls under but hate the smell!
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sbmiano
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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2013, 10:32:10 AM »

Probably put a dehumidifier in the garage to avoid a wet floor.  Should set it at 50 %
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joesauer
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« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2013, 12:29:54 PM »

Question.....  I've heard its better to leave the battery connected, but on a charger/maintainer during winter storage...vs disconnecting the battery?   I usually keep mine connected, but on a maintainer.  Makes it easier to start & run through the gears (with the garage door open) during winter.  With my car, seems to start better if I crank it up every 7 to 10 days.
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Sauron327
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« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2013, 07:48:04 PM »

Just like John said, there's no reason to start a car in storage. 6 months is not enough time to worry about not exercising a car; years might be. Your springs are getting more abuse by driving than sitting stable. Why jack it up? If you get your car's engine and body warm by running in winter and it is then in air that is cool after shiut down, moiisture wil condense on components. Don't over think it, just park it.
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169INDY
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« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2013, 11:36:40 PM »

Get a couple of the "DRIEZ" granule holders-cups and load them up with the desiccant. Use a pan or bucket for secondary containment to avoid spills at all cost. Check every once in a while and empty and refill with granules. This is VERY important here in the PNW where it friggin RAINS 3 out of the 4 seasons. I maintain usage of these neat simple effective devices all year long and you will be amazed how well it pulls the moisture out of the air. I put one in the trunk and one in the cabin of the car. The bonus is it attracts any spiders or little bugs and they drink the death juice in the cup and you will have no insect problems while the car is unattended. The other feature is the reduction of any mold growth in the car on the upholstery and head liner. They should be available at your local box store or hardware shop. This is a very simple method and the results are worth the time and expense.

Jim
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Jim
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jims69
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2013, 12:16:31 AM »

It's almost that time again.   Every fall;  wash and dry the car; check the tires, a full tank of gas with fuel stabilizer, desiccant bags in the trunk and inside the car.  We never start it until after the engine oil is changed in the spring; getting ready for the first drive of the year.
A battery tender on the battery a few times during the winter.   This is all we have ever done; and it has served us well over the years.

Jim
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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2013, 06:41:51 AM »

I suppose you fellas know how tempting you are making it..  for us southerners to MOVE NORTH?   Smiley   (tongue firmly in cheek!!)..  Smiley
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
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jims69
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« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2013, 09:26:10 AM »

I've lived in the south during my career.   Who knows why I ever returned to Omaha, Nebraska Huh??    My wife is from LA and we love our Camaro's, but they are off the road 4-5 months each year.  It sure does seem like the winters are getting colder & longer.............   
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JohnZ
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« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2013, 12:51:15 PM »

We never start it until after the engine oil is changed in the spring;

Minor item, but it's better to do the annual oil change just before you put the car away for the winter, so the engine sits all winter with FRESH oil in it; if you wait 'til Spring to change the oil, it sits all winter with contaminated old oil in it.
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'69 Z/28
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