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Author Topic: Stamps  (Read 783 times)
firstgenaddict
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« on: April 03, 2015, 11:21:25 AM »

Were the alternator and distributor stamped using a fixed position stamp with the aluminum housing "rolling" under the stamp?
OR
was the piece fixed and the stamp rolled into it?
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James
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william
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« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2015, 04:08:22 PM »

The hard-stampers I worked with in my Industrial Engineering days were fixed; the part was rolled over the stamp set.

Off-set ink stampers transferred an image to a fixed part.
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68camaroz28
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« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2015, 06:39:47 PM »

The hard-stampers I worked with in my Industrial Engineering days were fixed; the part was rolled over the stamp set.

Off-set ink stampers transferred an image to a fixed part.
Yea I remember those similar William, we used what we called a "roll stamp" to stamp parts in round pieces. The carriage could be taken out and different fonts/numbers could be installed. As the part rotated the stamp moved across the rotating part to stamp.
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MO
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« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2015, 09:33:32 PM »

The hard-stampers I worked with in my Industrial Engineering days were fixed; the part was rolled over the stamp set.

I can visualize the process, but how did the part get stamped? Was the part rolling over the stamp under pressure? Was there heat involved?
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william
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« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2015, 10:18:55 AM »

The process worked well for parts made of soft material; ours roll-stamped copper fuse caps. Place the part in the fixture hit the buttons; the fixture rolled the part over the stamp set under light pressure. Took a few seconds.

Roll-stampers were common and relatively inexpensive. Way back when I was involved with the Camaro business new distributor housings were still available from GM so we acquired 10 or so for someone. They weren't stamped of course but I'll bet they are now. New 1111480 distributors were also still available and we had a few of those.
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MO
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« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2015, 10:29:18 PM »

Very interesting, I've wondered how that worked. Thanks for the insight!
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firstgenaddict
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« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2015, 12:12:09 PM »

The hard-stampers I worked with in my Industrial Engineering days were fixed; the part was rolled over the stamp set.

Off-set ink stampers transferred an image to a fixed part.


After evaluating the patterns of the stamps on my distributors and Alternators this is how I had "visualized" the process, I appreciate your knowledge, thanks for the confirmation.

The ink stamps were they done using a Pad stamper?

I have seen videos of emblems having the colors applied using one of these. (Pad stamper)
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James
Collectin' Camaro's since "Only Rednecks drove them"
 
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william
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« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2015, 02:27:48 PM »

Some parts like alternators received an ink stamp in addition to the hard stamp part number for fast ID @ 57 units per hour. However I doubt it was done on a machine like that. Probably they were tested at the end of the line and were hand-stamped when they passed.
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firstgenaddict
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« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2015, 04:04:03 PM »

They were used to apply colors and text to irregularly shaped surfaces.
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James
Collectin' Camaro's since "Only Rednecks drove them"
 
Check out the Black 69 RS/Z28 45k mile Survivor and the Lemans Blue 69 Z 10D frame off...
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JohnZ
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« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2015, 11:45:39 AM »

Some parts like alternators received an ink stamp in addition to the hard stamp part number for fast ID @ 57 units per hour. However I doubt it was done on a machine like that. Probably they were tested at the end of the line and were hand-stamped when they passed.

The Delco-Remy alternator plant in Anderson, Indiana was the most highly automated plant in all of GM at the time - raw aluminum ingots and copper wire went in one end, and finished alternators came out the other end, at 1560 per hour (one every two seconds); imagine what it took to wind all that wire on all of those armatures/rotors and field coils at that volume.
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« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2015, 05:57:06 PM »

Very impressive stats John, would have made for a fascinating plant tour back in the day.
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Tim - 04A VN '69 z/28 69-69 715 ex-E/MP
KurtS
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« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2015, 11:12:22 AM »

You have to see an winder in action. Fascinating. And complicated.
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Kurt S
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1968RSZ28
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« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2015, 11:44:56 AM »

You have to see an winder in action. Fascinating. And complicated.

Since you mentioned it...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImdW5581KXg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gb23w4AN_IQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XneRA8Md1Pg

Paul
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KurtS
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« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2015, 12:14:07 AM »

That's an armature like starters use. Making that commutator is not trivial either.
Alternator stators used hairpins that are installed and then welded. Alternator armatures just have a coil installed between the pole pieces.
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Kurt S
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