Author Topic: NCIB  (Read 5156 times)

69pace

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Re: NCIB
« Reply #30 on: February 21, 2013, 01:41:07 AM »
So, these reports I see you can buy based on your supplied VIN don't include data as mention in this discussion?
For $6 dollars I was tempted to buy a report for my VIN but was curious if it was worth the money.

Mike
Yes and No. If the shippers records was there in the first place the data was sanitized to comply with the Privacy Act. Depending on who did the purge, some records only had the name and addresses purged on the shippers record,while others the entire shippers record was removed. The sanitizing was farmed out to different contractors and each ran different scripts to create the load out. Again if your vehicle was ever reported stolen, or was involved in an accident you have a better chance of finding it still in the database.
1969 Z-11 350/300 with 4 Speed
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GI JOE

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Re: NCIB
« Reply #31 on: February 24, 2013, 09:43:35 PM »
Do you think its possible that they might have an original backup copy of that original data somewhere even thought they did the purge?

Also I don't understand why they are so protective of this information, maybe I'm just not seeing it but I cant see how it would be bad if it was shared...

SFC GI JOE - Airborne Paratrooper
68- L-78, M22, BV
69- L-78, M22, BV, Conv

69pace

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Re: NCIB
« Reply #32 on: February 26, 2013, 02:48:41 AM »
The purge was an electronic process of the existing database(s), in which the names and addresses were deleted, and the new database that process created made available to the public. The only difference between the existing NICB database and the national version is that NICB can still see names and addresses as well as police case theft and recovery data which is not in the public database.

Paper records do pop-up from time to time but are rare and again usually they have survived because the vehicle(s) was/were stolen, by an target of a task force, more then likely chopped for parts, or exported overseas etc and was part of an investigation, or special statistical and training project and therefore were protected. The majority of the original paper trails are long gone and if they were never transferred to microfiche but as with most of American archives of the late 60's early 70's statistics were just extracted and loaded first on IBM punch cards then computer tape storage the original paper was considered redundant or obsolete and either destroyed or stuffed away and were never maintained with any preventative care. As the years passed by the acid based paper lacking the protection of a true climate controlled dry storage archival center, but more than likely just left in bankers boxes in some unheated warehouse to be forgotten, would fade and yellow out crumble and flake if not already eaten up by critters, bugs and mold.

Our only real hope would to have GM find a long lost and assumed forgotten and destroyed cache of Norwood assembly records. Unlikely as the factory and the majority of the buildings are gone now, and GM divesting itself of real-estate and facilities during bankruptcy. Still hold out hope that maybe in a non owned GM building, or storage bunker, or basement or attic most likely in the Norwood area something exists that someone authorized or not authorized "took" home with them.
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JoeC

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Re: NCIB
« Reply #33 on: February 27, 2013, 11:57:15 AM »
NICB does have old records as I know many people who did get the NICB info on Yenko cars.
I got one about 10 years ago. It was difficult to get and took time and a lot of phone calls.