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Author Topic: building a garage  (Read 5136 times)
GI JOE
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« on: December 20, 2012, 06:14:52 AM »

This might not be the place but... here goes

I am considering building a 3 car garage... soon...  any advice???

I am considering a 3 car where two bays are open and high enough to accommodate lifts... 3rd bay with above storage space..

i am thinking of 3500 psi concrete floor, 36x24 

garage height is limited to only 1.5 stories high...

Any ideas on cost /SF for some thing like this?

What size garage doors would you recommend?

What Lifts would you recommend and why?

Any advice on climate control, insulation, frost protection etc....  here in New England we need to go 42" down below the frost line...

something like this I think...

http://www.barnpros.com/products/garage-shop/barn-house-garage.html


...maybe I should be thinking of moving south to warmer weather... LOL   Grin  GI Joe
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« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2012, 07:05:08 AM »

First thing, if you have the room, go at least 30' deep. 24' doesn't leave much room to get around the car if there is a work bench in front of it. It'll cost you a little more, but you'll never regret it. Probably ought to go at least 12' side walls if you are putting a lift in there, 14' if you can do it and stay under your height requirement. Insulate under the concrete, even if you aren't planning on heating it. Sooner or later you probably will, and then it's too late if you don't.
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BillOhio
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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2012, 08:29:13 AM »

We have a farm and when we built our shop we installed the heat in the floor. It uses a gas instant hot water heater like you use for hot water in the house. When you open the doors your heat doesn't leave, floor doesn't sweat, nice to lay on and work, seems to be efficient. We love it
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Kelley W King
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« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2012, 09:07:08 AM »

I am in my 3rd garage now. I firmly agree that 24 ft. is not deep enough. My last one was 28 ft. and with the work bench and tool box it was workable but to pull and engine you had to back part of the car out the door. My present one is 31 ft. deep. I also recenting built a pole shed at my business with 12ft ceiling and had the truss builder raise a section in the middle of one bay about 18 inches for the lift clearance but going to all trusses kind of limits the upstairs storage. As far as doors I really like a 16 or 18 ft. door instead of 2 8 or 9 footers. My present house has 2 8 footers and I am waiting for my wife to take off her side mirror or worse. Plus have them insulated when installed. It is cheaper and easyier than doing it later. As far as lifts I have a 4 post drive on and a 2 post frame lift but I am considering buying a 4 post drive on that rolls around with the car not on it. I have friends that have them and they roll them out side on nice days to pressure wash or paint bottoms. If you condition it oversize the air handler and increase the duct outlets. I did and when not in use I set the temp to 55 or 60 in the winter and 80 to 85 in the summer. With over sized equipment I can change the temp about 10 degrees in 30 minuites whe in use. Lastly on my last garage I plumbed the air lines in. Northern Tool sells a PVC kit with stand 3 outlets, you can buy more. for less the $100 bucks. I put my compressor outside under a shed with a switch in the garage. This is one the best things I have done, it,s quiet and a 25 foot air hose is all I need. Here in NC a garage like this would cost $50 to $75 a square foot depending on the level you want it finished and the grading. Hope this gives yo some ideas to ponder.




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« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2012, 10:05:08 AM »

When we wanted to add an attached 24x26 garage to our old farm house, we had no limits on height or size, our garage part is 24' deep, and 26' wide, we also had 10' more feet in additional width as a 10' wide entry for our house which we needed badly, then we have 8' overhang in front and 12' overhang in back for a 12'x36' screen porch. Our zoning does not consider overhangs as part of the dimension for future taxes that you apply for. The overhang is taxed at much lower valueation...  but consider these hints:

1. Truss company will help you design the roofing trusses (most do it for free) to maximize space you can use above and below the trusses. Consider " attic trusses " which give you full stand up height storage space in the 'attic' area but on the outside it still looks like a 1 1/2 story design to get you past nosey neighbors or inspectors.
 The trusses can also be built to extend out over your garage doors for a HUGE overhang area in front of the doors. Great for parking cars under the overhang in winter for guests plus it keeps rain away from your garage doors. My overhang is 8 feet out from the garage doors. Smiley
They do wonders these days with custom designed trusses that give you huge storage areas, then add gable end windows for ventilation and light up there.

2. Use 2x6's for your walls, allows more insulation and strength for 'attic truss' needs.

3. I also 2nd the  "in slab" heat, its wonderful but remember to plan it so that any lift you install wont puncture any heat tubes in the floor. In fact, if you plan your lift location accurately, you can 'beef' up those corner locations with more slab concrete at those points where you will have bolts installed. Then you route your slab heat tubes around those areas.

4. Use at minimum a 100 amp elec. breaker box just for the new garage, so you have endless power options, 200amp boxes are about the same price but you might have to have new 200amp service pulled in from the pole, which adds to the price. Then put 20amp GFI outlets every 4' all the way around your new garage, plus a 220v if you plan on welding equipment. Also have exterior outlets on all 4 sides.

5. Plan your CAT 5 wires and TV cable for internet and speaker wires for TV and stereo system or surround sound.

6. Buy only thermal insulated windows of course to hold heat and keep out hot air in the summer.

7. Consider a heavy dute ventilation fan to exhaust summer heat out and any fumes you might create in the garage.

 Those are a few ideas that we used in our new garage.

Here are some pics that might give you some ideas and ask if you have any questions about our project  :







« Last Edit: December 20, 2012, 10:26:02 AM by click » Logged

Click is Jim , central Minn.  Moderator at Team Camaro www.camaros.net
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« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2012, 10:19:58 AM »

Not sure what the frost line has to do with it unless you are planning on running a water line to it.
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Danny
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« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2012, 10:28:10 AM »

Our frost line requirement for footings is 5 feet below grade, since our frost can go down almost that far here in Minnesota. Frost will 'heave' a footing and affect the structure above it, if it moves.

 Note, you dont go 42" below frost line itself... you go 42" below grade...
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« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2012, 10:44:45 AM »

Our frost line requirement for footings is 5 feet below grade, since our frost can go down almost that far here in Minnesota. Frost will 'heave' a footing and affect the structure above it, if it moves.

 Note, you dont go 42" below frost line itself... you go 42" below grade...

Guess I'm thinking pole barn type garage which is much cheaper to build. No footer required.
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Danny
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« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2012, 10:47:37 AM »

Our pole building required the posts to go down 5' below grade as well but no concrete footing under them...my 32x50 pole barn has not moved an inch in the 8 years its been up. Much cheaper to build for sure but sadly you cant 'attach' a pole building to a home or structure that has concrete footings since the 2 styles of construction move differently. Maybe down south they can?
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tmodel66
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« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2012, 10:53:49 AM »

Joe I vote to move South.  I have a nice 2 acre lot with 4 or 5 big old oak trees for shade and a 1/4 acre lot graded for your new house. Plus I need another Camaro gear head for a neighbor.  Grin

BTW it's 63* this morning and I'm in a tee shirt.  Shocked
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« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2012, 11:06:09 AM »

Here's a story "Corvette Fever" ran on my garage a couple of years ago - most of the specs and details are in the article. In terms of cold weather (also an issue here in Michigan), I framed the garage (and the house) with 2x6's to get R-26 insulation in the walls, R-58 in the ceilings, and the 18' x 8' steel/foam/steel sectional doors are custom-made with tubular seals between sections. I used a 10-mil Visqueen moisture barrier on the soil, then covered that with 5/8"-thick tongue-and-groove 4' x 8' sheets of high-density closed-cell foam with heavy foil on both sides, then mesh on stands and poured the slab on that, let it cure for 90 days, then had the slab steel shot-blasted, followed by two coats of solvent-based industrial epoxy. Even if it's zero outside, the floor is always warm and dry, with no moisture migration through the slab.

Super-insulating during construction makes all the difference - the home and attached garage total 5800 sq. ft., and we heat it (gas) for about $160.00 per month year-round. My "retirement office" is in the garage, so it's heated all the time.

http://www.corvettefever.com/techarticles/corp_0608_custom_corvette_garage/viewall.html
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« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2012, 11:10:51 AM »

John have you any need for an 'adopted' family?  Smiley
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« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2012, 11:39:01 AM »

Echoing what JohnZ, click, and others have prviously stated - let me emphasize:

Minimum 8' tall  - INSULATED doors (inslulation between the inner and outer door panels)

Also, strongly suggest lining the walls (or at least some of them) with pegboard.  Two ways of doing this.  If the local codes alow it (and they probably don't) you could install your wall insulation in between the studs and then mount the pegboard directly onto the studs.  In most municipalities though this won't pass fire code which requires drwall to be installed.  If that is the case then mount wood strips through the drywall to the studs and then mount the pegboard to the wood strips.  The wood strips will stand off the peg board from the drywall allowing a gap between the back of the pegboard and the drywall for hooks, etc.

Another advantage to mounting the pegboard to the drywall is that the drywall provides a lot of insulation.  Here in Northern Nevada at 4550 feet in elevation temperatures in the winter easily can go below 0.  I have never seen the temperature in my garage drop to below 45F.

Although I can heat my garage with a portable heater, the only time I used it was the winter of 2004-2005 when I had the front end of the car completely disassembled and was working on it every weekend and wanted to keep the garage at 65F while I was working.

Also, paint the pegboard - I went with an off white / cream color.  Don't leave it dark as it will literally "absorb" the light....and as we all know, there never is enough light in the right places to work with.

As far as lighting, install flourescent fixtures and install more than you think that you will need.  Once again, there is no such thing as too much light.

Attached picture gives you an idea as how mine came out when we buil the house in 2001.

Good luck and Merry Christmas!!

Richard
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« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2012, 03:39:19 PM »

John Z,

Checked out your garage article and drooled over your Z. I noticed it has wheel opening and drip rail moldings, so I'm guessing it's an X33? It doesn't look like it has the quarter trim pieces though? Or maybe I just can't tell in the pics?

Jimmy V.
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« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2012, 04:18:28 PM »

Definitely go way bigger than you think you need.  It will look huge when empty, but it will fill up quick - trust me.  My garage is 36 x 36.  It allows you to put two cars in end-to-end, but only if you don't have anything like a work bench up against the back wall.  Another thing to watch out for is support beams/columns.  You don't want any.  They turn a lot of garage space into a lot of unusable garage space.

My only other suggestion is if you plan to use the garage for collector cars and daily drivers.  Put a partition between the 2 areas.  You will want to keep your collector car area separate.  I ended up installing an industrial curtain in my garage to accomplish this.
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« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2012, 05:04:33 PM »

It's NOT big enough. I just built a 48X60 and it's full, can't go too big.  Go to the garage journal website, part of jalopy journal. You will find all the answers you need there. As John said, insulation is your friend.
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« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2012, 06:27:08 PM »

Here is my new unassembled building. 18 feet at the eves with a 1:12 pitch for mor stand up room. 400 Amp dual meter service for welders, lifts, glass beader, compressor etc. etc.No snow in Northern CA.The left door will go directly into my living space. Pull up right behind my couch! Radiant heat on 4 separate zones. If it's 30 degrees out and you are having dinner. And you know you are going to be working in the shop, you set that zone for 70 degrees and when you are done eating it's ready. BillOhio, it's actually on demand tankless you are probably talking about, not an instant hot. Instant hot goes at the kitchen sink. 2,600 Sq. Ft. living space and 1,600 Sq. Ft. shop. So it's 4,000 sq. Ft. CLEAR SPAN with enough room for a stand up loft, or storage or another bedroom another house to rent out with separate outside entrance. It's endless. OR.... I might switch it to 2,600 shop and 1,600 living. Roll up doors are R-9 insulated w/openers. Hit the button in the rain and drive right in my house. Kinda Dan Tana style. 2 - 10 X 10 doors and one 12 X 16 for a boat/RV/ ?  Good Times!....

OK, now the bad news...I bought this to have for my Z/28 storage spot and work shop. Lost the car in the middle of paying for it, { See picture of car } gotta sell the building as I can't afford the 50K for permits, slab, sewer tie in, etc. etc. etc.. Wanna buy it?Huh....Danny

40' X 100' X 18' Prefab metal building. Includes bags of hardware for assembly. This is a clear span 4,000 square foot Steel building. Open floor plan with NO center supports. The bracing is set-up for CA building standards to pass inspection. If you wanted to, you could take one door out of the front and put it in line in the back. That way you have a drive-thru. You can see how the roof vents split between the bays. And the Skylight panels can be put in where you want. This is 18' at the eves. So the pitch of the roof is higher by what looks like 2 or 3 feet. Never assembled. Manufactured in San Diego CA. This is a very nice building, far superior then most on the market. This building is 18 feet at the eves so it is set-up for a stand-up live-in loft inside. Use for shop and a Granny unit or bigger above. It is "A" frame gable symmetrical. With a 1:12 pitch. It is 4 bays at 25' each. Wind load is 85 MPH. It comes with the following: Assembly Manual, 2 sets of Blue Prints; 2 sets of Foundation Plans; 2 sets of foundation calc's; 2 sets of structural design calc's; 2 sets of Houston-Atwater spec's. ALL are stamped by a licensed engineer and ready to go for CA. 3 - 36" X 70" metal man doors with hardware. It is framed-out for roll-up doors on one long side for.. One 10' X 10', One 12' X 16' and another 10' X 10'. Door's not included; 10- Skylight roof panels; Trim is full cover deluxe formed for siding; 3- 10' Roof ridge vent's. Outside color of siding is light stone. The pictures just show what it would look like. Of course you would have 3 door openings on the one side, or you could buy some extra siding and only use one or two of the roll-up openings. You don't have to use all 3. This building is at my property in Sonoma CA and is ready for Pick-up. You will need a 45' flatbed if you want to do it all in ONE load. Otherwise 2 or 3 trips with a smaller trailer is fine. It did all arrive on ONE 45 foot trailer. To load I would use a JLG or Back Hoe. This building is ready to go. Just lay a slab and put it up. I have approx. 36K invested. Make an offer. Please be ready to bring help to load, as I will be unable to help.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2012, 07:00:57 PM by dannystarr » Logged
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« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2012, 06:53:59 PM »

It's NEVER big enough. I built a 32 X 28 foot, 1-18' roll up, 1-10' roll up, and made 3 mistakes: 1) a 10' ceiling, 2) a 4/12 pitch on the roof, and 3) I had one car when I built it. There are three inside now, with the fourth going in soon. I stick built it myself, so the only person I can complain about for the error in design is me. Do yourself a favor, and put a steep enough pitch to the roof where you can either second-story above the garage space for storage or a rec area. A friend of mine had a good idea (and lived in a heavily code-strict area), so he floored the upstairs in 2 X 10's with a tongue and groove sub floor, a large (wide) staircase attached with hinges and a winch to raise and lower it, and stored heavy items like blocks, heads, and manifolds there by the dozens. Ceiling was at least 12 feet. Clear span, no posts.
I wired mine myself (as long as you permit here, and have the requisite rough-in and finish inspections, they'll approve it), and saved myself a bunch of money plus I got everything I needed. 100 amp primary, ground faulted wall and ceiling outlets, 30 amp 230 service for welder/light compressor, 50 amp circuit for the big compressor/heater, 8 foot strip flourescents and eve lights, side and entry lights. Alarm circuits, cable TV and phone lines to boot. Now, if I had only built it larger - I might have had room to work on the cars inside (parts and cars are tough to step on when walking through the garage).

Good luck,
Steve
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« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2012, 06:58:55 PM »

And here is the lost car....... Danny
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« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2012, 07:29:46 PM »

Joe, you saw our garage (stable converted) but we cannot say enough about insulation. I placed the heaviest mill sheating I could find for what I concreted but wish the rest had been done as well due to moisture. What John had the foresight to do for his floor is quite commendable. Those dehumidifiers eat the electric up..... Not sure if you can but orientation can play also as its always nice to have the back wall facing north with no windows or doors. Our ceiling is 12' 4" so our 2 post lift was a breeze. Insulated garage doors are a must! Thinking of your heat source will be one of the many things to decide on before starting IMO. Since ours was already built we added a ceiling Reznor 75K propane heater to the one side which works nicely but if building from scratch I'd be considering other heat sources. Also added alarm system and heat pods for notifying in case of fire. Helps with insurance as well....
Gotta love all those horses in just a couple stalls.... Smiley


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« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2012, 08:43:01 PM »

Some nice garages for sure here, but you might want to also cruise around this site http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/
for some truly amazing garage plans and tips as well as tons on radiant floor and solar heating.
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« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2012, 10:52:24 PM »

4000 psi concrete would be the most appropriate for the floor slab, 3000 psi is plenty for the footings. Also make sure you use a high reach garage door where ever you are going to install a lift, also you will want to use a sideloader garage door opener so make sure the electrical is on the side that you want the opener. Insulate all you can afford it will be the cheapest part of your construction costs. Your plans look good, have fun with the construction. Darrell
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« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2012, 10:27:08 AM »

John Z,

Checked out your garage article and drooled over your Z. I noticed it has wheel opening and drip rail moldings, so I'm guessing it's an X33? It doesn't look like it has the quarter trim pieces though? Or maybe I just can't tell in the pics?

Jimmy V.

It's an original X33 car, but the original owner didn't care for all the jewelry and removed the fender emblems and quarter panel gills, and brazed the holes shut. He liked everything else, though - he ordered everything you could get on a Z/28 except a tilt wheel, vinyl top, and RS.
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« Reply #23 on: December 23, 2012, 05:48:28 AM »

Thanks everyone.. you all have given me some great tips and this advice is just what I needed to help me... 
 Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

I have the homework you all have provided me.. ha ha ha .. I just need to review it all

As for the size...  I sure would like to go bigger but I am limited by the septic system...

(my health district requires a minimum of ten feet away from the system... I have a dispersion line that is limiting the depth..)  Huh

I will post here when I get the garage going when the time comes...


BTW   -     Grin   Merry Christmas and happy holidays to all my Car brothers and their families out there... Grin

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« Reply #24 on: December 24, 2012, 01:59:05 PM »

i totally agree with building bigger. Couple of other thoughts:

1. My lift is a Rotary Asymmetric 10,000 lb lift. Very nice, particularly for working on the wheels.
2. Suggest lots of lights. My goal was "no shadows".
3. HVAC. It's very nice working on your vehicles during the winter in comfort.
4. Lots of electrical outlets. My rule: never need an extension cord.
5. Some suggested I install air supply lines throughout. I didn't, but wish I had.
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« Reply #25 on: December 24, 2012, 09:52:23 PM »

JMCbeth you are right in alot of ways. I never got my shop up, but I did alot of work on friends shops.
  
   The lift idea is great on wheels. Build a lean-to on the side and when not in use roll it out of the shop and out of the way. IF you have room??
   Lighting is great, nice commercial lighting does the trick. Don't get them from box stores, go to an electrical supply house.
   Heated floors are the best. Trying to heat large cubic feet can be expensive. Like I mentioned before, on demand tankless with zone valves.
   Check into a company called "BIG ASS Fans". Throw one of those with 6 or 8 or 10 foot blades in the ceiling with a remote and variable speed.
   Electrical outlets at both sides of the lift mounted to it AND in the floor! That's right flush mount in the floor with nice brass covers.
   Air lines on both sides of the lift and all over the bench area is great. I am a plumber for the last 24 years, and I do all my friends air lines in type "L" or "K" copper. With gauges, moisture filters and drain downs    
   looking down so you can drain condensation. Also make sure to stub out air lines OUTSIDE in front of the shop in between the rollups. A few feet of pipe and some fittings.
   While you are at it always run a mixing valve out front also for hot and cold water. Install a filtration system in-line so that way you can wash your car with filtered warm water.  Grin Grin  And when you spill trany fluid or the like, you have hot water to wash it down.
   It really is endless, I could go on and on. But I will tell you one other thing I have built for friends is a tall bench. And by that I mean a bench that is 48 inches high. Almost everybody builds there benches to low. Then I  
   watch them bend down while they are trying to see something. If you don't want your whole bench that height, then just build a 2 or 3 foot section at 48 to 50 inches. TRUST me,... when you are trying to solder some wires, or work on a small item it is great to just look almost right at it with out bending over. I have even built REMOVABLE 2 foot sections that clamp on your bench. Hang it on the wall, and take it down when needed and drop it into place and clamp it. Mount a baby vice, small light, magnifying glass, and those little vices with 2 or 3 flex arms on it ready to go. I wish I had pictures. I have been in multi-million dollar shops with live dolphins in the back yard!! And they build there benches at 30 inches??? Why Huh Huh  Never could understand that. I mention it and people laugh at me. And they do it with a sore back  Cool   ... Danny
« Last Edit: December 24, 2012, 11:03:25 PM by dannystarr » Logged
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« Reply #26 on: December 25, 2012, 01:07:31 AM »

I agree Danny; I always build my benches so they are chest high when I stand in front of it..  (who sits down and works at a bench?)... Smiley
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« Reply #27 on: December 31, 2012, 09:38:46 AM »

I agree with Danny's comments regarding  counter height. My counter was custom built by Moduline. You provide specifications and they build and ship. I opted for a stainless steel counter top. Couple of other things I thought to mention:

1. I have a stool that fits under the counter. I use this occasionally for long, detailed work, such as rebuilding a carb.
2. I also installed bright fluorescent lights directly over the counter. As I get older, the additional light has become very important.
3. The counter height allowed me to roll a Snap-On tool cabinet under it.
4. I also mounted a big screen TV on the wall above the counter. Nothing like putting on a football game while working on the cars.
5. I had speakers installed throughout the ceiling of my shop. This allows me to hear the TV or music from anywhere in the shop, regardless of the noise.

This is my fourth "garage", so I learn from each one.
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John
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« Reply #28 on: December 31, 2012, 05:29:06 PM »

Don't forget to add the incadescent desk lamp because the 12 bulb flourescent just isn't getting the job done.  Cheesy
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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2012, 09:22:21 PM »

that's the 'garage ambiance' illumination... Smiley
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
69 Corvette convertible, silver/black 350 hp,
60 Corvette white/red, 72 Corvette coupe (2), 
90 ZR1 red/red #246, 90 ZR1 white/gray #2466
72 El Camino, '55 Nomad, '57 Nomad, '57 B/A Sedan
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« Reply #30 on: December 31, 2012, 11:18:52 PM »

I am planning a new work shop and garage and have been thinking about layout and flow between machine tools, presses, welders and separation of work areas and vehicles being worked on. 
It's always a good idea to have an area separate to store vehicles whether with walls or with full length curtains helps to keep debris, chemical splashes, spills from getting where they shouldn't. If planned for and it never happens I figure it is cheap insurance...

Flow work areas from cleanest down, ie don't put polishing your car next to grinding on a frame/welding.

I second the tall work areas/benches, one of the best things I have seen is an electric scissor lift table, smaller ones can be had for as little as a few hundred dollars.
 
It is always a good idea to have a fire extinguishers hanging in the center of a RED BOX or a Red Arrow indicating location. ESPECIALLY If you have others in your garage who are not familiar with where you keep safety equipment.

Remember*** You can never have too many electrical outlets or air disconnects.

If you have blasting cabinets etc with cyclones/vacuum dust collectors place them in the external air compressor enclosure as well, your ears will thank you for the reduction in DB.

I thought 3000sqft was enough but now I'm thinking more...
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James
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Check out the Black 69 RS/Z28 45k mile Survivor and the Lemans Blue 69 Z 10D frame off...
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« Reply #31 on: January 01, 2013, 01:32:36 AM »

Don't forget to add the incadescent desk lamp because the 12 bulb flourescent just isn't getting the job done.  Cheesy

LOL. That's the night light for the security cameras.
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John
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bergy
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« Reply #32 on: January 01, 2013, 09:36:00 AM »

Wow - looking at all of the great ideas - I wish that I had waited to build my building!  A few somewhat uniqe features of mine - Clean Burn waste oil boiler that heats the building through hot water coils in the concrete floor.  Clean Burn unit & compressor & media blast cabinet are located in a seperate mechanical building.  Work bay has a work pit that is also heated with floor coils & ventillated.  Upstairs is an apartment for guests, missionaries, etc.

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bergy
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« Reply #33 on: January 01, 2013, 09:37:42 AM »

more

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mickeystoys69RSSS
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« Reply #34 on: January 01, 2013, 01:15:00 PM »

Love the stone work and metal roof. Some of these garages are bigger than my house. Of course that is relative as my current attached garage is three bay extra deep is bigger than my first apt at 780 sf.  Maybe some day I will have a seperate workshop, but for now I am happy with just having the car in the garage. I will have to save this thread for future reference when I do build a shop.
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« Reply #35 on: January 01, 2013, 02:17:13 PM »

Bergy, nice shop and car indeed. Would love to have info on the cars. Maybe just a couple lines each about them. No VINS or anything, just always fun to see what fellow car guys have.

As far as compressor location.... At my last place I had the compressor in a fully insulated room 100 feet away. Then I ran pipe to the shop area in 1" type "L" copper. Compressor could kick on anytime and I never heard a thing. I used to forget sometimes and leave it on. So I wired a very small appliance bulb off one of the 110Volt legs. And mounted it in the little window. That way when I was done and walking into my house, I would see it.
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68camaroz28
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« Reply #36 on: January 01, 2013, 03:22:48 PM »

1st class and well done Bergey! Can I be a guest or car missionary?  Grin
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Chick
68 Z/28 NOR 01B Orig motor/trans/rear
69 Z/28 NOR 07A Orig Block & GM Cross-ram/carbs
69 L34 Rest. Nova Father/Son Car
69 L78 Surv Nova Purch 4/69 31K miles
67 L89 Corv Tribute
68 Corv 427/400 Orig motor
07 Corv Z06
R 68Z build- http://www.camaros.net/forums/showthread.php?t=182584
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« Reply #37 on: January 01, 2013, 03:42:55 PM »

I would at least, have a frig in the floor plan...
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« Reply #38 on: January 01, 2013, 05:22:41 PM »

Can't you see the "Coors Light" on the refrigerator door?  Under the Ford sign.
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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #39 on: January 01, 2013, 07:17:51 PM »

A man that has an apartment for visiting 'pony car missionaries'..  must be a man who has everything!  Smiley

Gary
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
69 Corvette convertible, silver/black 350 hp,
60 Corvette white/red, 72 Corvette coupe (2), 
90 ZR1 red/red #246, 90 ZR1 white/gray #2466
72 El Camino, '55 Nomad, '57 Nomad, '57 B/A Sedan
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« Reply #40 on: January 02, 2013, 07:15:09 AM »

Any members who want to stop by are always welcome.  I love to talk to "car guys" & the refrigerator always has a a few beers in it!  Cars in this building are:  3  copo Camaros (one Yenko), Plum Crazy Hemi Challenger, 427/400 Corvette,  MIV AC Cobra (in SAAC registry), Z11 bb Pace Car, & Mustang GT convertible (daughter's first car).
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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #41 on: January 02, 2013, 12:32:53 PM »

sounds like 'pony car Heaven'...  there's no wonder you have to have a place for 'visiting missionaries'.. Smiley
so where are yuo located Bergy?  Smiley     realize there's a ton of us that would love to see your cars if you're close enough.. Smiley
Gary
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
69 Corvette convertible, silver/black 350 hp,
60 Corvette white/red, 72 Corvette coupe (2), 
90 ZR1 red/red #246, 90 ZR1 white/gray #2466
72 El Camino, '55 Nomad, '57 Nomad, '57 B/A Sedan
bergy
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« Reply #42 on: January 02, 2013, 06:55:04 PM »

Lancaster, PA area - best to contact me through email.
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DeanZ10
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« Reply #43 on: January 23, 2013, 02:36:38 PM »

NICE!  You must be the head guy in the Amish Mafia?Huh?? LOL
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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #44 on: January 23, 2013, 05:22:26 PM »

Bergy,
Thinking about your 'garage building' layout.. and I really like it.   Seems you have built it to have a one-car working space with a lift, separated from the clean 'storage garage' area.    and your storage area allows any one of up to 7 'pony cars' to be removed or put back without disturbing/moving any of the others.   I really like your approach; dirty area separate from clean; take out one car without moving others.. and basically garage 8 cars in a very nice 'envelope'.    I'm thinking of potentially duplicating your arrangement.  I'd love to have the dimensions of your building..  if you wouldn't mind sharing it?
Thanks,   Gary
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
69 Corvette convertible, silver/black 350 hp,
60 Corvette white/red, 72 Corvette coupe (2), 
90 ZR1 red/red #246, 90 ZR1 white/gray #2466
72 El Camino, '55 Nomad, '57 Nomad, '57 B/A Sedan
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« Reply #45 on: January 26, 2013, 09:42:48 PM »

Joe, you saw our garage (stable converted) but we cannot say enough about insulation. I placed the heaviest mill sheating I could find for what I concreted but wish the rest had been done as well due to moisture. What John had the foresight to do for his floor is quite commendable. Those dehumidifiers eat the electric up..... Not sure if you can but orientation can play also as its always nice to have the back wall facing north with no windows or doors. Our ceiling is 12' 4" so our 2 post lift was a breeze. Insulated garage doors are a must! Thinking of your heat source will be one of the many things to decide on before starting IMO. Since ours was already built we added a ceiling Reznor 75K propane heater to the one side which works nicely but if building from scratch I'd be considering other heat sources. Also added alarm system and heat pods for notifying in case of fire. Helps with insurance as well....
Gotta love all those horses in just a couple stalls.... Smiley




------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chick,  Your setup is terrific!!!  It gave me a little push to put in a bid on a foreclosure property that needs a ton of work.  But it's got 10 acres and a garage/stable combined that should work out A-OK.  I might need some advice from you along the way though.  Well and septic inspections are on Monday and then a closing date can be set.

One thing I haven't figured out yet is remodeling the horse stall part of the garage where the Camaros and the lift will go.

On one side is a 3 car garage.


On the other side, there are 3 horse stalls on the sides with an open section in the middle that has bricks on it right now.  I'm thinking the middle section is where the lift could eventually go since there's a lot of open space up top.  But the sides and doors are then all screwed up for Camaro parking spaces.






Under the stall flooring and the bricks are dirt.  No concrete floors there.  I think the first thing I have to do is make a rough sketch/floor plan of the current layout and figure it out from there.  It would be nice to have it all open space but there are loads of support posts & beams everywhere.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2013, 10:09:21 PM by DavidS » Logged

68camaroz28
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« Reply #46 on: January 27, 2013, 06:44:09 PM »

Oh do you have great potential there David! What a neat and interesting property. Not sure how I could help but anytime to brain storm whatever let me know. This is what I started with as it was a 10 stall working stable (pole buidling) 2.5 years old. As what you found the floors in the stall area itself were crushed stone with heavy rubber mats on top and then topped with wood chips. So the concrete work can become interesting like what's the best way to get it in? Fly crap gallore on the ceiling and one side of the building was basically pole building with beams and sheetmetal. Cleaned every square inch of the ceiling and walls with Lysol. Some pics starting off with how it looked when purchased and ending with present.








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Chick
68 Z/28 NOR 01B Orig motor/trans/rear
69 Z/28 NOR 07A Orig Block & GM Cross-ram/carbs
69 L34 Rest. Nova Father/Son Car
69 L78 Surv Nova Purch 4/69 31K miles
67 L89 Corv Tribute
68 Corv 427/400 Orig motor
07 Corv Z06
R 68Z build- http://www.camaros.net/forums/showthread.php?t=182584
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« Reply #47 on: January 27, 2013, 06:46:42 PM »



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Chick
68 Z/28 NOR 01B Orig motor/trans/rear
69 Z/28 NOR 07A Orig Block & GM Cross-ram/carbs
69 L34 Rest. Nova Father/Son Car
69 L78 Surv Nova Purch 4/69 31K miles
67 L89 Corv Tribute
68 Corv 427/400 Orig motor
07 Corv Z06
R 68Z build- http://www.camaros.net/forums/showthread.php?t=182584
bergy
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« Reply #48 on: February 04, 2013, 08:34:51 AM »

Hey Gary - Sorry for the delay in response to your question about the dimensions of my building.  It's about 60' wide x 75' deep.  The work bay is isolated from the general population, but there is a garage door in the rear of it so that cars can be moved in & out of the work area (roll-eze) without having to go outside in the rain or cold.  One of the design criteria was that all 8 cars must be able to be driven in & out without having to move other cars.  Hope this helps!
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69Z28-RS
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« Reply #49 on: February 04, 2013, 10:27:53 AM »

Thanks Bergy!   Smiley
Better late than never..    I loved the layout of your building, esp for the 'driving in and out' without movement of other cars... currently, I have 6 cars stored in my basement garage (behind two garage doors), so to get the back ones out, I  have to move at least one car and sometimes 2 (which sucks obviously).. and minimizes the amount of time I drive the back ones.   If you happen to have exact dimensions, or plans, I'd love to have them, but I'll see what I can work out using your approx dimensions in the meantime.
Thanks again,

Gary
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Gary W.  /  69Z28-RS, 72 B 720 cowl console rosewood all tint
69 Corvette convertible, silver/black 350 hp,
60 Corvette white/red, 72 Corvette coupe (2), 
90 ZR1 red/red #246, 90 ZR1 white/gray #2466
72 El Camino, '55 Nomad, '57 Nomad, '57 B/A Sedan
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