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105769 Posts in 12347 Topics by 4759 Members
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1  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: Looking for recommendations for poly locks for use with 302 on: October 20, 2014, 07:58:13 AM
I've had good success with ARP 12-point Perma-Loc hardware (part # 8241 for 3/8-24 thread studs or # 8242 for 7/16-20 thread studs).   Any poly-lock will work better if the stud ends are trued for a flat surface. the way ARP studs are finished.  A dimpled stud end does not provide a solid seat for the set screw.

c
2  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: valve confusion on: August 09, 2014, 09:57:34 PM
I got a call from my machine shop today letting me know the valves I had purchased to replace my originals were too small.

Valve head too small or valve stem too small?
3  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: 69 Z28 stuff on: May 30, 2014, 10:49:48 AM
My memories recall certain Nova 283,s being different. A friend who Pro raced in the 70,s always said they were stronger and had more meat but I cannot remember why he said they were.

If memory serves correctly, the Nova blocks were cast with the oil filter boss on the driver's side of the block raised somewhat in order to clear the clutch linkage.  Because those blocks were only used in Nova applications, it was apparently not cost effective to cast a separate block for 283 and 327 usage.  Since the casting had to be able to accommodate a 4" bore, any block that began life as a smaller bore 283 had somewhat thicker walls.  I've always encouraged my Stock Eliminator guys who run 283 combinations to search out Nova blocks for that reason.  As I said, I'm relying on recollections that are over 40 years old and I'm currently having difficulty remembering what I had for breakfast, so...
4  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: Your Friday Photo on: April 21, 2014, 02:39:27 PM
No livestock or flowers around here.  Just a candid shot of Ol' Blue in her natural habitat!

c
5  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: CRG t-shirts - How to order on: April 13, 2014, 08:06:59 AM
I'll be ordering t-shirts, Steve.
6  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Decoding/Numbers / Re: Early VIN? on: April 08, 2014, 03:00:35 PM
My neighbor has LOS body number 889 and it is tagged as 09C.  I've never asked him for the VIN but I saw the firewall tag.  The 327 that came  out of the car was stamped VO915MF.

c
7  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: Cars in action ! on: March 05, 2014, 11:32:48 AM
There have been many cars and thousands of passes over the years, mostly in NHRA Stock classes.  Here are two of my favorite rides.  The '68 F/SA  ran between 1980 and 2000 and the '94 C/SA has been here since about 2002.
8  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Restoration / Re: connecting rod reconditioning on: February 28, 2014, 10:36:05 AM
these rods are from a 67 SS350 engine with a dimple up by the piston pin.  11/16 bolts   They were reconditioned and I'm wondering  if it is possible to take too much material off while reconning them...  Maybe somebody could tell me if a rod can be reconditioned more than once.  My instints tell me if too much material is taken off with a loose fit that I could spin a bearing more easily.

 I hope you'll pardon me but in fifty years of working with small block Chevrolet motors, I've never encountered a set of rods with 11/16" bolts.  I think that dimension should be carefully re-measured. 

To answer your direct question, a connecting rod could conceivably undergo the reconditioning process more than once and, if the procedure is done correctly, wouldn't be necessarily at risk of spinning a bearing.  Personally, I would not want to use such a rod because of the odds that the center-to-center length could be compromised or inconsistent across the set.
9  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Restoration / Re: connecting rod reconditioning on: February 27, 2014, 10:12:44 AM
There are a few considerations when using re-conditioned rods.  The first is a slam-dunk:  make sure that new rod bolts, preferably ARP or some other recognized fastener, are included.  Rods should be re-sized any time the bolts are changed.

Second, double-check the center-to-center dimension.  A sloppy job of re-conditioning can result in variations in length if too much metal is removed from the rod.  Shortening the rod lowers compression slightly because the piston does not sit as high in the cylinder.  Of course, that difference can be compensated for during block prep but the center-to-center dimension should not vary more than a .001" if the job was done correctly.

Visually inspect the rods for nicks or grinding marks that could become stress risers and eventually result in cracks leading to rod failure.  This is a less common problem but it's always worth the time to hold the rods in your hand and visually inspect them for visible flaws.

If you're particularly concerned, you might ask to have them magna-fluxed.
10  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Decoding/Numbers / Re: Late 69 z28 build date? on: January 18, 2014, 09:13:29 AM
As a point of reference, my 10C '69 body number is 112565 and the VIN is just above 700000.  Of course, there was nothing special about the drive train combination of that car.   
11  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Decoding/Numbers / Re: POP anomaly?? on: January 08, 2014, 09:27:38 AM
Ed, just reading this post, I know it's old. My x11 has standard interior with the grab bar.

As does my 10C (1969) X11 coupe.

c
12  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Mild Modifications / Re: 8.2 10 bolt differential on: December 19, 2013, 09:24:02 AM
There are several factors that come into play with the 10-bolt.  One is the power level, another is traction, and another is driving style.  If you have a stick shift, put on sticky tires, and head to the drag strip, the life expectancy of the unit will be fairly short even with 300 horsepower.  If you have stock tires (not drag radials), a Powerglide, and you drive sanely, it will last much longer, even with 500 horsepower.   Wheel hop under acceleration is a prime consideration.  That will take out the axles sooner rather than later.  Putting in a posi-traction will enhance traction but better traction leads to wheel hop unless you use a slapper bar or other device designed to control wheel hop.  Those parts are not bullet-proof and if you challenge them, eventually you're going to come home on the hook.  You will control your own destiny through your driving style.

c
13  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: Age Groups of Our Hobby on: December 11, 2013, 06:54:27 PM
Thanks for extending the "top stop" limit.  It won't let me change my response, however.  I am counted as "over 60" but I belong in the "mid-septuagenarian" bracket.
14  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: Age Groups of Our Hobby on: December 11, 2013, 10:28:12 AM
Expanding the upper age limit of the poll might produce some interesting trends.  Sixty was so long ago that I have difficulty relating.
15  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Maintenance / Re: Oil Pan leaks... ugh.. on: December 03, 2013, 01:49:46 PM
With this gasket, I'd think if it's all rubber, one doesn't need any other sealers?.. 

The instructions in the Felpro gasket package suggest a light film of silicone at the four corners.  I also put a small bead of silicone between both the gasket and the pan and between the gasket and the timing cover/rear seal housings.  Some of this might be redundant or even unnecessary but when it comes to leakers, it's better to take a few extra steps than to omit one and regret it later.
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