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97523 Posts in 11718 Topics by 4581 Members
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1  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Originality / Re: Do we have a real SS in the garage? on: January 30, 2014, 10:06:30 PM
It was my understanding, and correct me if I'm wrong,  that all the solid lifter cars (L78, Z/28, COPO), received a single 3/8" fuel line and the other small and big block cars had two 5/16" lines. One fuel and 1 return.
Sorry, I was referring to 69's.  Roll Eyes
 

1969 only: All V8 cars received a single 3/8in fuel lines 6 cyl= 5/16in.single . All Q-jet equipped cars LM1, L48, L35, L34, had an extra 1/4 in return line
OK, thanks appreciate the information. I learn something new here everyday!
2  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Originality / Re: Do we have a real SS in the garage? on: January 30, 2014, 09:49:01 PM
Sorry, I was referring to 69's.  Roll Eyes
 
3  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Originality / Re: Do we have a real SS in the garage? on: January 30, 2014, 09:29:39 PM
It was my understanding, and correct me if I'm wrong,  that all the solid lifter cars (L78, Z/28, COPO), received a single 3/8" fuel line and the other small and big block cars had two 5/16" lines. One fuel and 1 return.
4  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: 69' Z/28 on eBay... What a Car! on: January 22, 2014, 09:22:07 PM
So, no PTB stamp on Van Nuys cars? I learn something new on here every day!  Grin
5  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Decoding/Numbers / Re: Why Are Some Blocks Stamped and Some Not on: June 23, 2013, 11:00:17 AM
Over the past few years, I have been watching and reading about original 69 Z/28 blocks with just the pad stamped, and some with the pad stamped and partial vin. # stamped by the oil filter. I understand from this site, why they changed the location of the partial vin. # and about when, so here is my questions.

With all the factory controls in place, along with a QC system they had back then, why weren't all car/blocks confirmed to be properly stamped both on the block pad and by the oil filter after they made the change?  Did it become so difficult to do during the production process to get done right, or did they just say oh what the heck, its not going to matter anyway and just let it go. Or, did they get it right and they are just that many re-stamp block out there these days.

As a hobbyist this continue to confuses me. Are there really that many re-stamps blocks out there these days and if so, about when did all the fakes start showing up.

Eddie

1) I believe there was a federal law in place that required the major components (engine/trans) be stamped with the VIN.    I believe taht the factory complied in all cases.
2) I also KNOW that the stamped code on the rough cast surface near the oil filter ARE extremely difficult to read.
3) I suspect that the 'block restamper/fakers' try to take advantage of the difficulty of reading the block stamp on the cast surface
4) YEss, there are a lot of restamped blocks.  (I do not believe the two posted by Steve are original stamps...)
Just wondering what would lead you to believe that the 2 posted block codes appear to be re-stamps? The first looks like it has the correct straight line broach marks but not real sure on the second one though. In reference to Chevrolet not stamping low performance blocks, my base model 307 3spd manual 1969 has the VIN stamped by the filter. Took awhile to see it, but once I cleaned the area it was pretty visible.
6  Camaro Research Group Discussion / General Discussion / Re: CRG t-shirts - How to order on: June 20, 2013, 08:23:07 PM
Count me in!  Grin

Eric
Rocky Mount, Va
Sizes 1 XL, 1 XXl for 2 shirts total
Print on front and back of both
7  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Decoding/Numbers / Re: 1968 Z/28 block code "MI" COPO 9665 info. on: January 09, 2006, 10:13:28 AM
I ran across the information in the Camaro White Book by Mike Antonick. It was in the 1968 block suffix section. I to had never heard of A COPO 9665 until I saw this or have I seen an "MI" coded 302 block. Appreciate the input. Maybe someone here has some more information.
8  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Decoding/Numbers / 1968 Z/28 block code "MI" COPO 9665 info. on: January 06, 2006, 06:51:30 PM
I like to consider myself pretty knowledgable on 1st gen camaros, but I ran across something today that I was hoping someone may be able to help shed some light on for me. I've always been under the impression that the only 1968 Z/28 block code was "MO", but today I ran across a piece of information stating that a block code of "MI" was used when COPO 9665 was specified. Anyone out there got any information on this and if it is correct? I've never heard of the "MI" block code for a 68 Z/28 and was wondering if anyone could verify they exist. Also was wondering if chevrolet did indeed produce a COPO 9665 in 1968, what did the package consist of?  Another COPO for 1968 I would like some information on is 9737 anyone know what this option consisted of? Thanks in advance.
9  Camaro Research Group Discussion / Restoration / Re: new quater panels on: November 01, 2005, 11:56:37 AM
Replacing the rear quarters may seem very intimidating at first but once you "dig in " to the project it really isn't that bad, just time consuming. I've replaced both rear qtrs. on my '67 and my '69 along with many other pieces of sheet metal along the way. As far as tools go, it sounds you like you have a good base to start with but you should really consider a compressor as a purchase as it will prove invaluable to you. Also, you should invest in a spot weld cutter and quality 3/8" or 1/2" drill to drill out the spot welds. You are also going to need at least a hand held propane torch to melt out the old body solder where the sail meets the roof panel. If you don't intend on using a compressor and air cut-off tool, there are many electric cut-off tools out there and you will definately need one, a dremel tool will not hold up to cuting off a qtr. panel.
Another thing to take into account is what is the extent of the body rot on this vehicle? If the qtr. panel is rusted along the outer edge of the wheel opening, you may need to replace the outer wheel well. Not a difficult task but one you may want to keep in mind.
Other than that, I like to start by melting out the old body solder and taking it from there. The hardest areas to remove I find are where the qtr. joins the drip rail. Very hard spot welds to get at with anything but a cut-off tool and it takes a delicate touch not to cut through the bottom of the drip rail. Other than that most of the spot welds are fairly easy to get to. It is also alot easier if cut out the face of the qtr. so all the welds are easier to get at. 
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