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Messages - bertfam

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 219
16
General Discussion / Re: Need help on GM intake manifold
« on: September 02, 2018, 01:10:58 AM »
The 346249 was a cast iron intake used on all Chevrolet 350 and 400 engines from 1975 through 1978. Can you post a picture of the date code? That doesn't seem right.

Ed

17
Decoding/Numbers / Re: Is this an original or re stamp
« on: September 01, 2018, 02:49:24 PM »
Dvbombr, email it to me (my email address is in my signature) and I'll post it for you.

Ed

18
Restoration / Re: 69 smog pump resto
« on: September 01, 2018, 12:11:15 AM »
Quote
Ed does that pump have some kind of manufacturer/factory"coating"?

Nope. Just raw aluminum. It's been in the original box since 1968, in the dark, in the garage. It belongs to Joe Lucia from the NCRS.

Ed

19
NADA isn't a good guide. Neither are auctions like Mecum or BJ. The best guide you can use is to go on ebay and look at the COMPLETED SECTION for cars that sold. That'll give you a much better idea of what they're going for.

As for this car in particular, treat it like a standard 68 that's had the RS option added and an engine replacement unless you can find something proving it's a Z28.

Ed

20
Restoration / Re: 69 smog pump resto
« on: August 31, 2018, 01:32:27 AM »
You have to be VERY careful with reskinning or tumbling. Smog pumps originally had machine extruding marks and these can easily be removed if you're not careful.

The attached picture is of an NOS smog pump dated 2568 (256th day of 1968). Notice the extrusion marks next to the fan. Once removed it's almost impossible to recreate!

Ed

21
Quote
So the question in my mind anyway, becomes, what's a documented Z28 worth vs a so called real Z28 with no documentation vs a regular Camaro that has all the Z28 parts and is there any real difference between 2 & 3?

A documented Z28 is worth more than an undocumented Z28. An undocumented Z28 is worth more than a Camaro dressed up as a Z28.

What you're will to pay for a car is up to you and no one can help you there.

Ed

22
You guys are putting a lot of faith in that CE being a 302! Even if it started out as a 302, after 40 years (and potentially multiple rebuilds), it could be anything! And, there's no proof that this particular engine was a dealer install for THIS car. That's one of the problems with CE engines and no paperwork. No history.

Nothing on this car proves a Z28. All of it could have been added after the car left the factory (like the Rally Sport option!!)

Ed

23
General Discussion / Re: The great 68 Camaro 10 bolt SS debate
« on: August 30, 2018, 01:34:47 PM »
If he would have read the article, he would have seen that:

Quote
AXLES/DIFFERENTIALS
There is some discrepancy about the rear axles used in Camaro Super Sports. The 12-bolt axle seems to be prevalent in all Super Sports, although factory literature suggests that SS 350s with automatic transmissions would've been equipped with 10-bolt axles. That seems to be the case with Powerglide-equipped SS 350s, but not those with Turbo Hydra-Matic transmissions. There were a wide variety of final-drive gear ratios available. A 3.31:1 ratio was standard with the small-block but 3.07:1, 3.55:1 and 3.73:1 were optional depending on transmission choice. A Powerglide came standard with a 3.07:1 gear. Selecting 4.10:1, 4.56:1 or 4.88:1 mandated a Posi-traction limited-slip differential.
Factory literature shows that the SS 396 came standard with a 3.07:1 gear ratio and that the performance ratio was a 3.31:1 ratio. Optional economy and special ratios included the 2.73:1 and the 2.56:1. Given the ease with which these cars could be special ordered, it's conceivable that almost any gear ratio could've been specified. Camaro axles are stamped, usually on the passenger side tube, with an assembly code that lists the date of assembly, place of assembly as well as a letter code that can be decoded to tell the original gear ratio. The axle casting date is cast into the upper left side of the housing above the cover. This can be used to date the axle in order to determine if it is original to the car or not.

This is true, but ONLY for late 1969 (although we're still researching this for earlier 1969's). All Hemmings has to do is insert the wording "later built 1969" in that sentence:

The 12-bolt axle seems to be prevalent in all Super Sports, although factory literature suggests that later built 1969 SS 350s with automatic transmissions would've been equipped with 10-bolt axles. That seems to be the case with Powerglide-equipped SS 350s, but not those with Turbo Hydra-Matic transmissions.

From our own 1969 CAMARO VISUAL ID HYPERTABLE page (Note 9):

Quote
9. GM documentation indicates that the LM1 and L48 with M35 or M38 (350/4-barrels with automatic transmissions) were to receive a 10-bolt rear axle with multi-leaf springs. However, the physical evidence shows LM1/M35, LM1/M38, and L48/M38 vehicles actually received 12-bolt axles. Physical evidence on L48/M35 cars (SS-350 with PowerGlide transmission) is still limited, but indicates that at least the later builds received 10-bolt, multi-leaf axles; axle use for early 69 L48/M35 vehicles remains unclear. CRG continues to research this issue.

Ed

24
General Discussion / Re: The great 68 Camaro 10 bolt SS debate
« on: August 29, 2018, 02:12:04 PM »
My father always told me "never argue with an idiot". I suggest you leave it alone. You'll never convince him.

As for magazine articles publishing incorrect information, it's been going on since the movable type was invented and I see no end to it. Unfortunately, the "authors" of those articles don't do any real research before publishing so most of them are riddled with inaccuracies. Not much you can do.

Ed

25
Quote
4 piston in the front as well as the rear on JL8 package?

Correct. More info HERE.

Ed

26
Quote
Quick question, did all 67 and 68 Camaros with front disc brakes have 4 piston calipers? and didn't the single piston deal come out in 69?

Correct on all counts. However, in 1969 the 4 wheel disc brake option (RPO JL8) also used 4 piston calipers.

Ed

27
1969 - Orphans / Re: Z28 Engine
« on: August 28, 2018, 01:12:41 PM »
Guys, it would be best to PM jaybee and take this off the forum.

Ed

28
General Discussion / Re: tags inside of door panels...
« on: August 27, 2018, 11:58:56 PM »
Quote
My understanding is that the stickers were put on all cars at the time of assembly, not at the time of any adjustment.
If adjustment under warranty was necessary, the dealer workshop had to remove (part or all of) the sticker and submit to zone with the payment claim, to prove the door trim had been removed.

That actually makes sense.

Quote
So, if a car has no sticker, maybe it did have adjustment under warranty. But all four?

Mine's a convertible and we all know what a PITA adjusting the glass on a convertible is so maybe all 4 had to be adjusted? Maybe at different times too, not all at the same time? You never know...

Quote
I looked at the stickers on the other post. Any idea what the numbers mean? Maybe the week of the year?

That makes sense too.

Ed

29
General Discussion / Re: tags inside of door panels...
« on: August 27, 2018, 10:50:31 PM »
I've not seen any on my 05D Los Angeles 68, but then again, it may not have been in for adjustment.

Ed

30
Quote
How did you find out it was on EBay?

The CRG has been tracking these cars for 20 years (even longer for some), so we have histories on a lot of these cars. COMPLETE histories for some, and partial history for others.

Ed

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