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Messages - Mike S

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1
Originality / Re: Request 67 L35 engine bay photos
« on: Today at 07:08:13 PM »
Brent,
  What is the trim tag date code?

Mike

2
Originality / Re: Request 67 L35 engine bay photos
« on: Today at 05:29:53 PM »
 This is a link to a previous discussion on BB air cleaners you may find of interest:
http://www.camaros.org/forum/index.php?topic=11091.0;all

Mike

3
Originality / Re: Request 67 L35 engine bay photos
« on: Today at 03:36:25 PM »
 I didn't forget.....I plan on taking shots from all three sides as well as certain closeups and will post later today. Yes, as far as I know all '67's had chrome valve covers ( referred to as bright engine trim in the sales literature) but not all had chrome air cleaner lids. MY two 67's (04B & 05B) have the black lids.

Mike

4
Originality / Re: Request 67 L35 engine bay photos
« on: May 24, 2018, 06:51:52 PM »
 With or without AIR (smog pump)

Mike

5
Decoding/Numbers / Re: Is it legit? 124677L126103
« on: May 24, 2018, 04:07:06 PM »
  Who knows why people take these things off outside of the obvious intents.
You can get the correct style rivets on eBay especially the rosette style for the VIN tag that mounts in the door jamb.

Mike

6
General Discussion / Re: Palmetto Entrprises
« on: May 23, 2018, 01:51:50 PM »
 Those flakes are a normal byproduct of the phosphate process. Just filter the solution through a coffee filter to remove them. If the flakes are allowed to sit in the tank or pot then it will eventually develop a thick crust on the bottom and sides.
  Keep the phosphate solution temp between 160-190. If you let the solution boil then you'll likely see more flakes. For pure water I use deionized water (DI) from an item used in the aquarium hobby called The Tape Water Purifier. Itís a low cost way to get pure water compared to the more costly Reverse Osmosis (RO) filters. The one thing to do so as to prevent streaking on larger parts is clean, clean, clean and wear gloves when handling the parts before the phosphate bath. This is what we do when treating firearms and the solutions are the same but sold under the name of Parkerizing and you can get that for either gray or black phosphate.
  When I plate the bolts, nuts, washers or pulleys I'll de-grease them followed by glass beading then placed in a jar of denatured alcohol (small hardware) until I'm ready to plate. The larger items like water pump & alternator pulleys I'll put in a pot of boiling water before they get put into the phosphate solution to remove any possible oils and that also brings the larger parts to a higher temp so when they get placed into the phosphate bath, the process starts almost immediately. This works for me with car and gun parts.
  The one important thing is to pre-condition the new phosphate bath with a fine iron particles in a coffee strainer to get a good finish when first using the solution. Here is a link to a PDF outlining the process used in the firearms hobby:
https://www.brownells.com/userdocs/learn/Inst-482%20Parkerizing.pdf

Mike

7
 The distributor was installed when the motor was assembled.  The alternator was installed on the motor when the car was assembled so its date would be closer to the trim tag date period. The standard amperage alternator was a quickly consumed item so it could be reasonably close to the car assembly date. My 67 L35 with the standard 37A alternator has a May 5, 67 stamp and the car was assembled the 2nd week of May 67. But my other 67 L35 (April 67) with the optional higher (44A) amperage alternator is dated Jan 30, 67.

Here are previous discussions on alternator vs. car build dates:
http://www.camaros.org/forum/index.php?PHPSESSID=cjovfnsrrmiritd3qohgdlbov2&topic=11931.0
http://www.camaros.org/forum/index.php?topic=13254.msg113669#msg113669

Mike

8
General Discussion / Re: motor mounts
« on: May 17, 2018, 01:47:35 PM »
 When I restore my '67 L35 recently I used new original style non-locking motor mounts (from LI Corvette) because they are very visible and I wanted the restoration to be as close to factory as possible despite the cars early design flaws. I certainly don't drive the car hard like I used to back in the 80's. When driving, I pamper it now so I don't really worry about the mounts breaking loose. The timing chain I used is the single link type so as to keep in-sync to type used back then, though it is not nylon covered (was the BB nylon too?)

Mike

9
General Discussion / Re: Oil pressure at idle
« on: May 15, 2018, 09:40:46 PM »
I agree on the idiot light, the factory gauge is a tad out of your line of sight

  Plus, being on a angle to our line of site the reading unfortunately is with a parallax view.
But, I do agree that the factory gauge marks are 20 PSI per line as '67Jeff mentioned. I recently had an numeric oil gauge on my L35 prior to installing the console and at fast idle to driving it was 60 PSI (3 marks on factory gauge) and 45 PSI at idle (approximately 2 1/5 lines on the factory gauge).

Mike

10
Restoration / Re: GM hood hinge springs
« on: May 14, 2018, 01:00:13 AM »
 I replaced the 67 hood springs with GM springs (28 coils) recently and they look and fit exactly as the originals.
The finish is an oiled phosphate. The originals would allow the hood to slowly close about 1/2 way.

Mike

11
General Discussion / Re: Gas gauge off
« on: May 13, 2018, 03:10:48 PM »
 I don't think that gauge pointer can be physically moved on its shaft. The needle travel is determined by the sending unit's resistance at various fuel levels.
  Check the black sending unit ground connection wire that is secured to the chassis on the passenger side by the fuel gauge pipe to make sure it has an electrically clean ground. If that looks good then the sending unit is likely due to be replaced.

Mike

12
Maintenance / Re: Oil
« on: May 10, 2018, 03:48:51 PM »
 I've been using any good dino 10w-30 oil that is on sale along with a bottle of ZDDP for my 67 L35.
For my  other cars/SUV's I use any good quality oil (whatever the dealer recommends) and have always logged over 250,000 miles on the motors and that is putting close to 7,000 miles oil changes. By the time I get 250K miles I usually buy another car because I get bored with the one I have. Also by that time, the value is way down due to age and mileage so I could never justify the expense of synthetic oil.
 
Mike

13
  Interesting how the metal tags shown in this thread are on the left side and the sizes look similar. I am guessing they are approximately 5-6" wide? I moved the magnet to the left side and though my car doesn't have a rear spoiler, standing back and looking at the sticker on the left side, it sort of 'balances' the look with the Chevrolet/Camaro emblems on the right side. But, I'll keep it on the right side being that is how it came originally. I'll admit that I do like the metal tags better.
  On another note I happen to find an original Spielman dealer key ring on eBay from an estate sale. I snatched it up immediately and have my keys hanging from that now while I drive it.

Mike

14
Garage Talk / Plymouth buried for 50 years on purpose video
« on: May 08, 2018, 09:18:48 PM »
 I stumbled across this video about a Plymouth that was purposely buried for 50 years in a vault.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMxxS4tRhLM

Mike

15
Restoration / Re: Rear drum brake backing plate questions.
« on: May 08, 2018, 07:09:21 PM »
 If those were my plates and I could not find less worn ones, I would MIG weld (or flux core wire feed works as well) the valleys and file them down flush so as to fill those low areas.

Mike

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